Topical Collection "Plant, Algae and Lichen Response to Abiotic Stress: from Molecules to Ecosystems"

Editors

Prof. Dr. Luigi Sanita' di Toppi
Website SciProfiles
Collection Editor
Department of Biology, University of Pisa, via Luca Ghini 13, 56126 Pisa, Italy
Interests: heavy metals; metal homeostasis; phytochelatins; phytochelatin synthase; glutathione; plant evolution; lichens
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Vasileios Fotopoulos
Website SciProfiles
Collection Editor
Associate Professor in Structural & Functional Plant Biology, Department of Agricultural Sciences, Biotechnology & Food Science, Cyprus University of Technology, P.O. Box 50329, 3603 Lemesos, Cyprus
Interests: abiotic stress; antioxidants; priming; reactive oxygen species; growth promotion; plant metabolism; plant biotechnology; plant physiology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Martin Backor

Collection Editor
Department of Botany, Institute of Biology and Ecology, P. J. Safarik University in Kosice, Manesova 23, 041 67 Kosice, Slovakia
Interests: lichens; algae; mosses; abiotic stress; heavy metals; secondary metabolism of lichens; polar ecology of lower plants
Dr. Anna Aksmann
Website
Collection Editor
Department of Plant Physiology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Biology, University of Gdansk, Wita Stwosza str. 59, PL-80-308 Gdansk, Poland
Interests: abiotic stress; anthropogenic pollutants (herbicides, pharmaceuticals); green algae response to stress factors; Chlamydomonas reinhardtii; plant physiology and biochemistry

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

 

We pleased to announce that, we are launching a Topical Collection of Plants entitled “Plant, Algae, and Lichen Response to Abiotic Stress: From Molecules to Ecosystems”.

 

We would be delighted to receive your authoritative contribution, and we look forward to working together to collect high-quality research articles, and review articles in all the fields related to the above topic.

 

Since the aim of this Topical Collection is to illustrate, through selected works, frontier research in "Plant, Algae, and Lichen Response to Abiotic Stress: From Molecules to Ecosystems", we encourage Editorial Board Members of our Section to contribute by sending papers reflecting the latest progress in their research field, or to invite relevant experts and colleagues to do so.

 

In particular (but not exclusively), this Collection welcomes high-level manuscripts related to interactions between plants (and/or the above-mentioned organisms) and:

  • Elevated temperature and/or low temperature (chilling and freezing);
  • Salinity stress;
  • Excess (flooding) and/or lack of water (drought);
  • Hypoxia and/or anoxia;
  • Excess and/or lack of light, with the impact on photosynthesis and other primary processes;
  • Mineral nutrient excess and/or shortage;
  • Oxidative stress;
  • Nitrogen oxides (NOx) stress;
  • Tropospheric ozone and/or photochemical smog;
  • Acid rain or marine aerosols;
  • Heavy metals and/or metalloids;
  • Liquid or solid particulate matter, including nanoparticles;
  • Microplastics;
  • Organic pollutants, with particular reference to dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), furans, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH);
  • Volatile organic compounds (VOC);
  • Biomonitoring and/or bioaccumulation;
  • Bioremediation and/or phytoremediation.
Prof. Dr. Luigi Sanita' di Toppi
Dr. Vasileios Fotopoulos
Prof. Martin Backor
Dr. Anna Aksmann
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Elevated temperature and/or low temperature (chilling and freezing)
  • Salinity stress
  • Excess (flooding) and/or lack of water (drought)
  • Hypoxia and/or anoxia
  • Excess and/or lack of light, with the impact on photosynthesis and other primary processes
  • Mineral nutrient excess and/or shortage
  • Oxidative stress
  • Nitrogen oxides (NOx) stress
  • Tropospheric ozone and/or photochemical smog
  • Acid rain or marine aerosols
  • Heavy metals and/or metalloids
  • Liquid or solid particulate matter, including nanoparticles
  • Microplastics
  • Organic pollutants, with particular reference to dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), furans, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)
  • Volatile organic compounds (VOC)
  • Biomonitoring and/or bioaccumulation
  • Bioremediation and/or phytoremediation.

Published Papers (2 papers)

2020

Open AccessReview
Protective Roles of Cytosolic and Plastidal Proteasomes on Abiotic Stress and Pathogen Invasion
Plants 2020, 9(7), 832; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9070832 - 02 Jul 2020
Abstract
Protein malfunction is typically caused by abiotic stressors. To ensure cell survival during conditions of stress, it is important for plant cells to maintain proteins in their respective functional conformation. Self-compartmentalizing proteases, such as ATP-dependent Clp proteases and proteasomes are designed to act [...] Read more.
Protein malfunction is typically caused by abiotic stressors. To ensure cell survival during conditions of stress, it is important for plant cells to maintain proteins in their respective functional conformation. Self-compartmentalizing proteases, such as ATP-dependent Clp proteases and proteasomes are designed to act in the crowded cellular environment, and they are responsible for degradation of misfolded or damaged proteins within the cell. During different types of stress conditions, the levels of misfolded or orphaned proteins that are degraded by the 26S proteasome in the cytosol and nucleus and by the Clp proteases in the mitochondria and chloroplasts increase. This allows cells to uphold feedback regulations to cellular-level signals and adjust to altered environmental conditions. In this review, we summarize recent findings on plant proteolytic complexes with respect to their protective functions against abiotic and biotic stressors. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Screening for Drought Tolerance in Maize (Zea mays L.) Germplasm Using Germination and Seedling Traits under Simulated Drought Conditions
Plants 2020, 9(5), 565; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9050565 - 29 Apr 2020
Abstract
Maize is known to be susceptible to drought stress, which negatively affects vegetative growth and biomass production, as well as the formation of reproductive organs and yield parameters. In this study, 27 responsive traits of germination (G) and seedlings growth were evaluated for [...] Read more.
Maize is known to be susceptible to drought stress, which negatively affects vegetative growth and biomass production, as well as the formation of reproductive organs and yield parameters. In this study, 27 responsive traits of germination (G) and seedlings growth were evaluated for 40 accessions of the Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK) germplasm collection, under no stress and simulated drought stress treatments by 10%, 15%, and 20% of polyethylene glycol (PEG). The three treatments significantly reduced G% and retarded seedlings growth, particularly the 15% and 20% PEG treatments; these two treatments also resulted in a significant increase of abnormal seedlings (AS). The heritability (H2) and correlations of the traits were estimated, and drought tolerance indices (DTIs) were calculated for traits and accessions. The H2 of G% values were reduced, and H2 for AS% increased as the PEG stress increased. Positive correlations were found between most trait pairs, particularly shoot and root traits, with 48 highly significant correlations under no stress and 25 highly significant correlations under the 10% PEG treatments, particularly for shoot and root traits. The medium to high heritability of shoot and root seedling traits provides a sound basis for further genetic analyses. PCA analysis clearly grouped accessions with high DTIs together and the accessions with low DTIs together, indicating that the DTI indicates the stress tolerance level of maize germplasm. However, the resemblance in DTI values does not clearly reflect the origin or taxonomic assignments to subspecies and varieties of the examined accessions. Full article
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Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Landraces: a natural treasure for abiotic stress tolerance
Authors: Tommaso Michele Moles and Diana Santelia
Affiliation: Institute of Integrative Biology, ETH Zurich, Universitätstrasse 16, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland
Abstract: Over the last century, anthropogenic pressure and global climate change have exacerbated the frequency and the extent of detrimental environmental stresses, such as drought, salinization, sudden flooding and extreme temperatures. These events, which often occur simultaneously, are challenging the global agriculture and the quest to satisfy the increasing food demand of a growing population. The expected scenario will be more catastrophic especially in arid and semi-arid areas, including the Mediterranean basin. The selection of crops well-adapted to adverse climate conditions will be essential to sustain agricultural productivity. Landraces (or traditional/local varieties) are often characterized by interesting traits, like tolerance to abiotic/biotic stresses and adaptability to low-input agriculture, which have been acquired and selected in local agro-ecosystems. In this review, we evaluate the current literature on the strategies developed by landraces in response to abiotic stress, highlighting the potential of this genetic material as a priority target of future scientific investigation and a feasible solution for breeding stress-tolerant germplasm.

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