Advances in Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Plant Species, 2nd Edition

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Genetics, Genomics and Biotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 September 2024 | Viewed by 786

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Agriculture, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642, China
Interests: molecular markers; plant breeding and genetics; agricultural biotechnology; plant genomics; polyploidy; rice; agronomy; plant reproduction
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
College of Agriculture, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642, China
Interests: plant breeding and genetics; cytogenetics; plant reproduction biology; polyploidy; rice; plant germplasm enhancement
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Due to the success of the first volume of the Special Issue and the undiminished enthusiasm for this topic, we are launching its second volume.

The world is currently being confronted with an increasing population, food insecurity, and climate change. As of April 2019, the world population was estimated at 7.7 billion, and it is forecast to grow to more than 9 billion by 2050. Because the world’s population is growing at an unprecedented rate, feeding this population is becoming a big challenge, and there is a need to increase the world’s food production by 60–110%. Industrialization has brought economic prosperity; additionally, it has resulted in a larger population and urbanization. However, it has played a significant role in climate change as well. Climate change is causing a hazardous scenario for global food security by reducing food production by disturbing the cropping pattern and lowering the resistance of crops to biotic and biotic stress. Researchers have applied plant breeding as the most effective tool for dealing with these issues. However, the role of plant breeding in genetic erosion is also universally accepted. Therefore, our current food cultivars are not performing well under these unprecedented climatic conditions because of a genetic bottleneck. To mitigate all these problems, there is a need to harness plant diversity.

Exploring and managing genetic resources is a valuable approach, encompassing the collection, preservation, and characterization of genetic materials. This strategy proves instrumental in unraveling both genotypic and phenotypic variations, offering a rich resource for the breeding community. Addressing the limited genetic diversity of our food crops is achievable through the inclusion of landraces, crop wild relatives, and the often-overlooked plant species. Diversifying the genetic base lays the foundation for developing novel crop varieties resilient to diverse biotic and abiotic stress factors while concurrently enhancing yield and nutritional quality. The judicious combination of both traditional and cutting-edge breeding technologies expedites this process. By tapping into the vast reservoir of genetic resources, the creation of a new generation of crops emerges—ones characterized by heightened resistance, improved nutritional content, and an enhanced taste profile. Ultimately, the strategic utilization of plant diversity has the potential to revolutionize dietary patterns and contribute to improved public health. The exploration and incorporation of genetic resources open doors to the development of foods and ingredients that not only cater to enhanced nutritional needs but also elevate the overall sensory experience, thereby promoting the well-being of the population.

This Special Issue will focus on highlighting the importance of plant biodiversity and genetic resources for a sustainable agricultural production system. We welcome original research papers, reviews, perspectives, opinions, and modeling approaches regarding plant genetic diversity, breeding, omics, biotechnological technologies, and the biodiversity conservation of plant species.

Dr. Muhammud Qasim Shahid
Prof. Dr. Xiangdong Liu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • germplasm characterization
  • phenotypic evaluation
  • molecular characterization
  • molecular breeding
  • germplasm conservation
  • phenotypic markers
  • molecular markers
  • functional markers
  • molecular breeding
  • next generation sequencing
  • genotyping by sequencing
  • marker-assisted selection
  • genetic mapping
  • QTL mapping
  • GWAS
  • plants
  • cereals
  • legumes
  • oilseeds
  • medicinal plants
  • endangered species
  • horticultural crops
  • genetic erosion
  • biodiversity conservation and enhancement
  • valuing plant genetic diversity
  • plant wild relatives
  • genetic improvement of crops
  • DNA banking for plant breeding
  • climate change resilience
  • cultivar development
  • agricultural productivity
  • omics and biotechnological technologies

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

18 pages, 19648 KiB  
Article
The Phylogeography of Deciduous Tree Ulmus macrocarpa (Ulmaceae) in Northern China
by Hang Ye, Yiling Wang, Hengzhao Liu, Dingfan Lei, Haochen Li, Zhimei Gao, Xiaolong Feng, Mian Han, Qiyang Qie and Huijuan Zhou
Plants 2024, 13(10), 1334; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants13101334 - 12 May 2024
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Abstract
Disentangling how climate oscillations and geographical events significantly influence plants’ genetic architecture and demographic history is a central topic in phytogeography. The deciduous ancient tree species Ulmus macrocarpa is primarily distributed throughout Northern China and has timber and horticultural value. In the current [...] Read more.
Disentangling how climate oscillations and geographical events significantly influence plants’ genetic architecture and demographic history is a central topic in phytogeography. The deciduous ancient tree species Ulmus macrocarpa is primarily distributed throughout Northern China and has timber and horticultural value. In the current study, we studied the phylogenic architecture and demographical history of U. macrocarpa using chloroplast DNA with ecological niche modeling. The results indicated that the populations’ genetic differentiation coefficient (NST) value was significantly greater than the haplotype frequency (GST) (p < 0.05), suggesting that U. macrocarpa had a clear phylogeographical structure. Phylogenetic inference showed that the putative chloroplast haplotypes could be divided into three groups, in which the group Ⅰ was considered to be ancestral. Despite significant genetic differentiation among these groups, gene flow was detected. The common ancestor of all haplotypes was inferred to originate in the middle–late Miocene, followed by the haplotype overwhelming diversification that occurred in the Quaternary. Combined with demography pattern and ecological niche modeling, we speculated that the surrounding areas of Shanxi and Inner Mongolia were potential refugia for U. macrocarpa during the glacial period in Northern China. Our results illuminated the demography pattern of U. macrocarpa and provided clues and references for further population genetics investigations of precious tree species distributed in Northern China. Full article
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