Plant Hormone Signaling in Plant Stress Physiology

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Response to Abiotic Stress and Climate Change".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2022) | Viewed by 18810

Special Issue Editors

Department of Plant Physiology, Agricultural Institute, Centre for Agricultural Research, Eötvös Loránd Research Network, H-2462 Martonvásár, Hungary
Interests: abiotic stress; acclimation; heavy metal stress; oxidative stress; polyamines; plant stress physiology; salicylic acid; signalling
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Imre Majláth, Department of Plant Physiology and Metabolomics , Centre for Agricultural Research, H-2462 Martonvásár, Hungary
Interests: photosynthesis; chlorophyll-a fluorescence induction; reactive aldehydes; biostatistics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail
Guest Editor
Department of Plant Physiology, Agricultural Institute, Centre for Agricultural Research, Eötvös Loránd Research Network, H-2462 Martonvásár, Hungary
Interests: bioanalytical methodology; biotic stress; plant hormones

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Plant hormones are low molecular weight organic compounds, which occur in low concentrations and are produced by plants as secondary metabolites to regulate growth, development, reproduction, even death, and the adaptation to environmental stimuli. Five major classes of plant hormones have been known for a long time, including auxins, cytokinins, gibberellins, ethylene, and abscisic acid. Meanwhile, the list of classical hormones has been expanded to brassinosteroids, jasmonates, salicylic acid, and strigolactones. However, the definition of a plant hormone has not been clearly established. Further plant growth regulators, such as polyamines, can also be classified as plant hormones, depending on which hormone definition is considered.

In general, plant hormones can be divided into two groups depending on their role in the control of senescence. Ethylene, jasmonic acid, salicylic acid, and abscisic acid, and, to a minor extent, strigolactons have been characterized as hormones promoting senescence, while cytokinins, auxins, gibberellins, and brassinosteroids are regarded as hormones delaying senescence. Nevertheless, plant hormones do not exert their effects alone. They interact with each other in a complex network with versatile antagonistic and synergist connections which due to this fine-tuning lead to actual plant responses both under normal and stress conditions. Furthermore, their action and/or metabolism can be in relation to the synthesis of other protective or signaling compounds and hormones or hormone-like compounds, e.g., carotenoids, ethylene, gamma aminobutyric acid, glycine betaine, phytochelatins, flavonoid derivatives, proline, hydrogen peroxide, and nitric oxide.

Stress modulates almost all physiological, biochemical, and molecular processes in plants. Revealing the way of perception, new elements and cross-talking can help us to establish new models in the regulation of plant hormones.

Here, we invite researchers to publish their results, including original research, methodological or review papers focused on plant hormones, and their signaling in plant stress physiology. Investigations at metabolite and gene expression levels are welcomed to highlight changes in hormonal balance, newly discovered roles of plant hormones and hormone-like compounds, and their interactions with each other. Studies with exogenous application of hormones and using mutant or transgenic genotypes under biotic or abiotic stress are greatly encouraged.  

Dr. Magda Pál
Dr. Imre Majláth
Dr. Dernovics Mihály
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • abiotic stress
  • bioanalytical methodology
  • biotic stress
  • plant hormones
  • protective compounds
  • signaling
  • stress physiology

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

13 pages, 2835 KiB  
Article
Involvement of IDA-HAE Module in Natural Development of Tomato Flower Abscission
by Lu Lu, Samiah Arif, Jun Myoung Yu, June Woo Lee, Young-Hoon Park, Mark Leo Tucker and Joonyup Kim
Plants 2023, 12(1), 185; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12010185 - 1 Jan 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1961
Abstract
The unwanted detachment of organs such as flowers, leaves, and fruits from the main body of a plant (abscission) has significant effects on agricultural practice. Both timely and precise regulation of organ abscission from a plant is crucial as it influences the agricultural [...] Read more.
The unwanted detachment of organs such as flowers, leaves, and fruits from the main body of a plant (abscission) has significant effects on agricultural practice. Both timely and precise regulation of organ abscission from a plant is crucial as it influences the agricultural yield. The tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) has become a model system for research on organ abscission. Here, we characterized four tomato natural abscission variants named jointless (j), functionally impaired jointless (fij), functionally impaired jointless like (fij like), and normal joint (NJ), based on their cellular features within the flower abscission zones (AZ). Using eight INFLORESCENCE DEFICIENT IN ABSCISSION (SlIDA) genes and eight HAESA genes (SlHAE) identified in the genome sequence of tomato, we analyzed the pattern of gene expression during flower abscission. The AZ-specific expression for three tomato abscission polygalacturonases (SlTAPGs) in the development of flower AZ, and the progression of abscission validated our natural abscission system. Compared to that of j, fij, and fij like variants, the AZ-specific expression for SlIDA, SlIDL2, SlIDL3, SlIDL4, and SlIDL5 in the NJ largely corelated and increased with the process of abscission. Of eight SlHAE genes examined, the expression for SlHSL6 and SlHSL7 were found to be AZ-specific and increased as abscission progressed in the NJ variant. Unlike the result of gene expression obtained from natural abscission system, an in silico analysis of transcriptional binding sites uncovered that SlIDA genes (SlIDA, SlIDL6, and SlIDL7) are predominantly under the control of environmental stress, while most of the SlHSL genes are affiliated with the broader context in developmental processes and stress responses. Our result presents the potential bimodal transcriptional regulation of the tomato IDA-HAE module associated with flower abscission in tomatoes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Hormone Signaling in Plant Stress Physiology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

22 pages, 3621 KiB  
Article
The Effects of Exogenous Salicylic Acid on Endogenous Phytohormone Status in Hordeum vulgare L. under Salt Stress
by Hülya Torun, Ondřej Novák, Jaromír Mikulík, Miroslav Strnad and Faik Ahmet Ayaz
Plants 2022, 11(5), 618; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants11050618 - 24 Feb 2022
Cited by 25 | Viewed by 3295
Abstract
Acclimation to salt stress in plants is regulated by complex signaling pathways involving endogenous phytohormones. The signaling role of salicylic acid (SA) in regulating crosstalk between endogenous plant growth regulators’ levels was investigated in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. ‘Ince’; 2n = 14) [...] Read more.
Acclimation to salt stress in plants is regulated by complex signaling pathways involving endogenous phytohormones. The signaling role of salicylic acid (SA) in regulating crosstalk between endogenous plant growth regulators’ levels was investigated in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. ‘Ince’; 2n = 14) leaves and roots under salt stress. Salinity (150 and 300 mM NaCl) markedly reduced leaf relative water content (RWC), growth parameters, and leaf water potential (LWP), but increased proline levels in both vegetative organs. Exogenous SA treatment did not significantly affect salt-induced negative effects on RWC, LWP, and growth parameters but increased the leaf proline content of plants under 150 mM salt stress by 23.1%, suggesting that SA enhances the accumulation of proline, which acts as a compatible solute that helps preserve the leaf’s water status under salt stress. Changes in endogenous phytohormone levels were also investigated to identify agents that may be involved in responses to increased salinity and exogenous SA. Salt stress strongly affected endogenous cytokinin (CK) levels in both vegetative organs, increasing the concentrations of CK free bases, ribosides, and nucleotides. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, auxin) levels were largely unaffected by salinity alone, especially in barley leaves, but SA strongly increased IAA levels in leaves at high salt concentration and suppressed salinity-induced reductions in IAA levels in roots. Salt stress also significantly increased abscisic acid (ABA) and ethylene levels; the magnitude of this increase was reduced by treatment with exogenous SA. Both salinity and SA treatment reduced jasmonic acid (JA) levels at 300 mM NaCl but had little effect at 150 mM NaCl, especially in leaves. These results indicate that under high salinity, SA has antagonistic effects on levels of ABA, JA, ethylene, and most CKs, as well as basic morphological and physiological parameters, but has a synergistic effect on IAA, which was well exhibited by principal component analysis (PCA). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Hormone Signaling in Plant Stress Physiology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

23 pages, 4554 KiB  
Article
Impacts of Effective Microorganisms, Compost Tea, Fulvic Acid, Yeast Extract, and Foliar Spray with Seaweed Extract on Sweet Pepper Plants under Greenhouse Conditions
by Mostafa H. M. Mohamed, Rokayya Sami, Amina A. M. Al-Mushhin, Maha Mohamed Elsayed Ali, Heba S. El-Desouky, Khadiga Ahmed Ismail, Radwan Khalil and Reda M. Y. Zewail
Plants 2021, 10(9), 1927; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10091927 - 15 Sep 2021
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 3790
Abstract
Sweet pepperincludes several vitamins and is regarded as a great source of bioactive nutrients, such as carotenoids and phenolic compounds, for human growth and activities. This work aimed to investigate the effects of the soil addition of growth stimulants, namely, effective microorganisms (EM), [...] Read more.
Sweet pepperincludes several vitamins and is regarded as a great source of bioactive nutrients, such as carotenoids and phenolic compounds, for human growth and activities. This work aimed to investigate the effects of the soil addition of growth stimulants, namely, effective microorganisms (EM), compost tea, fulvic acid, and yeast extract, and foliar applications of seaweed extract, on the vegetative growth, enzyme activity, phytohormones content, chemical constituents of plant foliage, fruit yield, and fruit quality of sweet pepper plants (Capsicum annuum L. cv. Zidenka) growing under greenhouse conditions. The results showed that the tallest plant, largest leaf area/plant, and heaviest plant fresh and dry weights were recorded after combining a soil addition of yeast extract and foliar spray with seaweed extracts at 3 g/L in two growing seasons. The highest number of fruit/plant, fruit yield/m2, fruit values of vitamin C (VC), total sugars, total soluble solids (TSS), and carotenoids, along with the highest leaf of cytokines, P, K, Fe, and total carbohydrates values, were obtained using a soil addition of fulvic acid and spray with seaweed extract at 3 g/L in the two seasons of study. These treatments also provided the lowest abscisic acid, peroxidase, and super oxidase dismutase values in the same conditions. Sweet pepper plants supplemented with compost tea and seaweed extract foliar spray at 3 g/L were the most promising for inducing the highest values of fruit fresh and dry weights, fruit length and diameter, and the leavesrichest in N, Zn, and Mn; inversely, it induced the lowest catalase levels in both seasons. The applications of EM, yeast extract, and seaweed extract could be applied for high growth, mineral levels, enzymatic activity, fruit yield, and nutritional value of sweet pepper fruit and minimizing environmental pollution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Hormone Signaling in Plant Stress Physiology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

29 pages, 2627 KiB  
Review
Ethylene Signaling under Stressful Environments: Analyzing Collaborative Knowledge
by Mehar Fatma, Mohd Asgher, Noushina Iqbal, Faisal Rasheed, Zebus Sehar, Adriano Sofo and Nafees A. Khan
Plants 2022, 11(17), 2211; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants11172211 - 25 Aug 2022
Cited by 41 | Viewed by 7607
Abstract
Ethylene is a gaseous plant growth hormone that regulates various plant developmental processes, ranging from seed germination to senescence. The mechanisms underlying ethylene biosynthesis and signaling involve multistep mechanisms representing different control levels to regulate its production and response. Ethylene is an established [...] Read more.
Ethylene is a gaseous plant growth hormone that regulates various plant developmental processes, ranging from seed germination to senescence. The mechanisms underlying ethylene biosynthesis and signaling involve multistep mechanisms representing different control levels to regulate its production and response. Ethylene is an established phytohormone that displays various signaling processes under environmental stress in plants. Such environmental stresses trigger ethylene biosynthesis/action, which influences the growth and development of plants and opens new windows for future crop improvement. This review summarizes the current understanding of how environmental stress influences plants’ ethylene biosynthesis, signaling, and response. The review focuses on (a) ethylene biosynthesis and signaling in plants, (b) the influence of environmental stress on ethylene biosynthesis, (c) regulation of ethylene signaling for stress acclimation, (d) potential mechanisms underlying the ethylene-mediated stress tolerance in plants, and (e) summarizing ethylene formation under stress and its mechanism of action. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant Hormone Signaling in Plant Stress Physiology)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop