Effects of Management Practices on Field Crop Growth, Yield, and Quality

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Crop Physiology and Crop Production".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 January 2025 | Viewed by 936

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Center for Agricultural Water Research in China, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083, China
Interests: field crops; regulating plant growth; soil water; soil temperature; soil aeration; soil fertility; soil salinity; heat and humidity in crop canopy

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Guest Editor
Beijing Key Laboratory of Urban Hydrological Cycle and Sponge City Technology, College of Water Sciences, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China
Interests: efficient water use in agriculture; irrigation and drainage; microclimate in cropland
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Due to global population growth, frequent extreme weather events, and water scarcity, enhancing crop growth, yield and quality has become an increasingly challenging task. At the regional scale, issues such as how to efficiently utilize agricultural water resources (surface and groundwater, brackish water, recycled water, precipitation, etc.), how to adjust planting structure to adapt to such limited agricultural water resources and how to recycle agricultural waste (such as aquaculture wastewater and crop residues) have always been research concerns. At the field scale, issues such as how to regulate the water, fertility, air, heat, and salt status of soil through surface mulching, tillage, cultivation, fertilization, and irrigation, improve the microclimate of farmland, optimize plant density and structure, fully utilize light and heat resources, minimize hazards such as drought stress, waterlogging, insufficient fertility, poor aeration, freezing damage, high temperature stress, salt stress, etc., and create suitable environmental conditions for crop growth are current hot research topics. This Special Issue of Plants will highlight the Effects of Management Practices on Field Crop Growth, Yield, and Quality. The research and exchange of these issues are not only conducive to promoting interdisciplinary integration and development, but also to integrating comprehensive management measures to address the aforementioned challenges.

Prof. Dr. Fengxin Wang
Prof. Dr. Haijun Liu
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • regulation of soil water
  • fertility
  • aeration
  • temperature
  • salinity
  • microclimate in crop land
  • management practices
  • regional scale
  • farmland scale
  • efficient use of agricultural water resources
  • field crop
  • growth, yield and quality

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 2940 KiB  
Article
Effect of Subsoiling on the Nutritional Quality of Grains of Maize Hybrids of Different Eras
by Liqing Wang, Xiaofang Yu, Julin Gao, Daling Ma, Tong He and Shuping Hu
Plants 2024, 13(14), 1900; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants13141900 - 10 Jul 2024
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Abstract
To achieve high maize (Zea mays L.) yields and quality grain, it is necessary to develop stress-resistant cultivars and related cultivation practices, aiming to maximize efficiency. Thus, our objectives were (i) to investigate the impact of tillage practices and maize hybrids (which [...] Read more.
To achieve high maize (Zea mays L.) yields and quality grain, it is necessary to develop stress-resistant cultivars and related cultivation practices, aiming to maximize efficiency. Thus, our objectives were (i) to investigate the impact of tillage practices and maize hybrids (which have improved over time) on yield and its components, and (ii) to characterize the response pattern of maize hybrid grain nutrient quality components to subsoiling. To achieve this, we conducted field trials with five maize hybrids from different eras under two tillage practices: rotary tillage and subsoiling. We compared grain yield, nutritional quality, and other indicators across different tillage conditions from the 1970s to the 2010s. The main results of this study are as follows: under rotary tillage conditions, the 2010s hybrid (DH618) significantly increased yields (9.37–55.89%) compared to hybrids from the 1970s–2000s. After subsoiling, the physiologically mature grains of all hybrids exhibited minimal changes in crude protein and fat content, while there was a significant reduction in the total soluble sugar content of the grains. After subsoiling, there was a substantial 8.14 to 12.79 percent increase in total starch accumulation in the grain for all hybrids during the period of 47–75 days post-anthesis. Furthermore, during the period of 47–75 days after anthesis, the consumption of grain crude protein significantly contributed to the accumulation of total starch in the grains. Ultimately, subsoiling significantly increased the yield of each hybrid and enhanced the total grain starch content at physiological maturity of all hybrids, with the 2010s hybrid (DH618) performing exceptionally well. Full article
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24 pages, 4744 KiB  
Article
Effects of Nitrogen Application at Different Levels by a Sprinkler Fertigation System on Crop Growth and Nitrogen-Use Efficiency of Winter Wheat in the North China Plain
by Keke Wang, Haijun Liu and Zhuangzhuang Gao
Plants 2024, 13(12), 1714; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants13121714 - 20 Jun 2024
Viewed by 475
Abstract
Nitrogen (N) is an essential macronutrient for crop growth; therefore, N deficit can greatly limit crop growth and production. In the North China Plain (NCP), winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is one of the main food crops, and its yield has increased [...] Read more.
Nitrogen (N) is an essential macronutrient for crop growth; therefore, N deficit can greatly limit crop growth and production. In the North China Plain (NCP), winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is one of the main food crops, and its yield has increased from approximately 4000 kg ha−1 to 6000 kg ha−1 in the last two decades. Determining the proper N application rates at different growth stages and in all seasons is very important for the sustainable and high production of wheat in the NCP. A field experiment with five N application rates (250, 200, 150, 100, and 40 kgN·ha−1, designated as N250, N200, N150, N100, and N40, respectively) was conducted during the 2017–2018 and 2018–2019 winter wheat seasons to investigate the effects of the N application rate on water- and fertilizer-utilization efficiency and on the crop growth and yield of winter wheat under sprinkler fertigation conditions. The results showed that in the N application range of 40–200 kg ha−1, crop yield and water- and fertilizer-use efficiencies increased as the N application rate increased; however, further increases in the N application rate (from N200 to N250) did not have additional benefits. The N uptake after regreening of winter wheat linearly increased with crop growth. Considering the wheat yield and N-use efficiency, the recommended optimal N application rate was 200 kg ha−1, and the best topdressing strategy was equal amounts of N applied at the regreening, jointing, and grain-filling stages. The results of this study will be useful for optimizing field N management to achieve high wheat yield production in the NCP and in regions with similar climatic and soil environment conditions. Full article
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