Special Issue "Abiotic Stress in Fruit Crops"

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Response to Abiotic Stress and Climate Change".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Victor Blanco
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural Engineering, ETSIA, Universidad Politécnica de Cartagena, Paseo Alfonso XIII, 48, 30203, Cartagena (Spain)
Interests: irrigation and water management; soil and water conservation; abiotic stress; tree fruit physiology; tree fruit production; climate change and agriculture
Dr. Lee Kalcsits
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Horticulture, Washington State University, 1100 N Western Ave., 98801, Wenatchee, USA
Interests: tree fruit physiology; plant nutrition; climate change and agriculture
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In many fruit-growing regions, water availability, optimum temperatures, and good soil contribute to their suitability for production. However, drought, salt, light, nutrient, and temperature stress can still negatively affect plant productivity. Assessing plant stress resistance to abiotic stress is crucial for the continuity and sustainability of agriculture in regions that are highly vulnerable to extreme weather. Furthermore, climate change has the potential to magnify these common abiotic stress factors, and it is important to understand how fruit production will be affected. These stresses induce morphological, physiological, and biochemical changes affecting vegetative and reproductive responses and fruit quality. These mechanisms and responses to abiotic stress will likely vary across cultivars and crop species. Consequently, adopting new crop management strategies, technologies, and crop systems in addition to developing and evaluating new cultivar/rootstock combinations that maintain productivity and increase resource-use efficiency will be useful to ensure high productivity and quality of perennial fruit crops under a changing climate.

The Special Edition is open to research articles on perennial fruit crops focused on the following topics:

  • Implications of changing climate on productivity of fruit crops;
  • Mechanisms and strategies for improving abiotic stress tolerance;
  • Sustainable water management in fruit trees;
  • Effects of water salinity on fruit crops, vegetative growth and yield;
  • Effects of high temperature and high solar irradiance on fruit trees;
  • Impact of preharvest abiotic stresses on postharvest fruit physiology.

Dr. Victor Blanco
Dr. Lee Kalcsits
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Abiotic stress tolerance
  • Climate change
  • Drought
  • Fruit crops
  • Fruit quality
  • Heat
  • Light
  • Salinity
  • Water management

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Characterization of PcLEA14, a Group 5 Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein Gene from Pear (Pyrus communis)
Plants 2020, 9(9), 1138; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9091138 - 03 Sep 2020
Abstract
Fruit trees need to overcome harsh winter climates to ensure perennially; therefore, they are strongly influenced by environmental stress. In the present study, we focused on the pear homolog PcLEA14 belonging to the unique 5C late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein group for which [...] Read more.
Fruit trees need to overcome harsh winter climates to ensure perennially; therefore, they are strongly influenced by environmental stress. In the present study, we focused on the pear homolog PcLEA14 belonging to the unique 5C late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein group for which information is limited on fruit trees. PcLEA14 was confirmed to belong to this protein group using phylogenetic tree analysis, and its expression was induced by low-temperature stress. The seasonal fluctuation in its expression was considered to be related to its role in enduring overwinter temperatures, which is particularly important in perennially. Moreover, the function of PcLEA14 in low-temperature stress tolerance was revealed in transgenic Arabidopsis. Subsequently, the pear homolog of dehydration-responsive element-binding protein/C-repeat binding factor1 (DREB1), which is an important transcription factor in low-temperature stress tolerance and is uncharacterized in pear, was analyzed after bioinformatics analysis revealed the presence of DREB cis-regulatory elements in PcLEA14 and the dormancy-related gene, both of which are also expressed during low temperatures. Among the five PcDREBs, PcDREB1A and PcDREB1C exhibited similar expression patterns to PcLEA14 whereas the other PcDREBs were not expressed in winter, suggesting their different physiological roles. Our findings suggest that the low-temperature tolerance mechanism in overwintering trees is associated with group 5C LEA proteins and DREB1. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Abiotic Stress in Fruit Crops)
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Open AccessArticle
Water Deficit Timing Affects Physiological Drought Response, Fruit Size, and Bitter Pit Development for ‘Honeycrisp’ Apple
Plants 2020, 9(7), 874; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9070874 - 09 Jul 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Irrigation is critical to maintain plant growth and productivity in many apple-producing regions. ‘Honeycrisp’ apple characteristically develops large fruit that are also susceptible to bitter pit. Limiting fruit size by restricting irrigation may represent an opportunity to control bitter pit in ‘Honeycrisp’. For [...] Read more.
Irrigation is critical to maintain plant growth and productivity in many apple-producing regions. ‘Honeycrisp’ apple characteristically develops large fruit that are also susceptible to bitter pit. Limiting fruit size by restricting irrigation may represent an opportunity to control bitter pit in ‘Honeycrisp’. For three seasons, ‘Honeycrisp’ trees were subject to water limitations in 30-day increments and compared to a fully watered control. Water limitations were imposed from 16–45, 46–75, and 76–105 days after full bloom (DAFB). Soil moisture for the well-watered control was maintained at 80–90% of field capacity for the entire season. For two years, physiological measurements were made every 15 days from 30 to 105 DAFB. Fruit quality, bitter pit incidence, shoot length, and return bloom were also measured to assess impacts on growth and productivity. When water was limited, stomatal conductance and net gas exchange were lower compared to the well-watered control and stem water potential decreased by 30–50% throughout the growing season. Early season water limitations had a lower impact on plant response to abiotic stress compared to late-season limitations. Overall, water deficits during fruit expansion phases contributed to fewer large fruit and decreased overall bitter pit incidence with no negative effects on fruit quality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Abiotic Stress in Fruit Crops)
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Open AccessArticle
Freezing Tolerance and Expression of β-amylase Gene in Two Actinidia arguta Cultivars with Seasonal Changes
Plants 2020, 9(4), 515; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9040515 - 16 Apr 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Low temperature causes injuries to plants during winter, thereby it affects kiwi fruit quality and yield. However, the changes in metabolites and gene expression during cold acclimation (CA) and deacclimation (DA) in kiwi fruit remain largely unknown. In this study, freezing tolerance, carbohydrate [...] Read more.
Low temperature causes injuries to plants during winter, thereby it affects kiwi fruit quality and yield. However, the changes in metabolites and gene expression during cold acclimation (CA) and deacclimation (DA) in kiwi fruit remain largely unknown. In this study, freezing tolerance, carbohydrate metabolism, and β-amylase gene expression in two Actinidia arguta cv. “CJ-1” and “RB-3” were detected from CA to DA stages. In all acclimation stages, the “CJ-1” was hardier than “RB-3” and possessed lower semi-lethal temperature (LT50). Furthermore, “CJ-1” had a more rapid acclimation speed than “RB-3”. Changes of starch, β-amylase, and soluble sugars were associated with freezing tolerance in both cultivars. Starch contents continued to follow a declining trend, while soluble sugars contents continuously accumulated in both cultivars during CA stages (from October to January). To investigate the possible molecular mechanism underlying cold response in A. arguta, in total, 16 AcBAMs genes for β-amylase were identified in the kiwi fruit genome. We carried out localization of chromosome, gene structure, the conserved motif, and the analysis of events in the duplication of genes from AcBAMs. Finally, a strong candidate gene named AaBAM3 from AcBAMs was cloned in Actinidia arguta (A. arguta), The real-time qPCR showed that AaBAM3 gene expression in seasonal changes was consistent with changes of soluble sugars. These results reveal that AaBAM3 may enhance the freezing tolerance of A. arguta through increasing soluble sugar content. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Abiotic Stress in Fruit Crops)
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