Species from the Allium Genus: Cultivation and Food Chemistry

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Phytochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 May 2024 | Viewed by 1238

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Agriculture and Nutrition, Institute of Agriculture and Tourism, K. Hugues 8, 52440 Poreč, Croatia
2. Centre of Excellence for Biodiversity and Molecular Plant Breeding, Svetošimunska 1, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: Allium extracts; vegetable production; food chemistry; bioactive properties; volatile compounds; multivariate data analysis; sensory profile; food and nutrition

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Agriculture and Nutrition, Institute of Agriculture and Tourism, K. Hugues 8, 52440 Poreč, Croatia
2. Centre of Excellence for Biodiversity and Molecular Plant Breeding, Svetošimunska 1, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: plant physiology; crop management; crop physiology; vegetable production; horticulture; abiotic stress; sensory profile; food and nutrition

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The species in the Allium genus are widely consumed throughout the world. For example, these species and their extracts have been known since immemorial times for their health-beneficial properties, including their anticarcinogenic, antioxidant, antidiabetic, renoprotective, anti-atherosclerotic, antibacterial, antifungal, and antihypertensive activities in traditional medicines. Allium sativum L. is rich in several sulfur-containing phytoconstituents, such as alliin, allicin, ajoenes, vinyldithiins, and flavonoids, such as quercetin. The biological activity of Allium extracts is conditioned by the type of Allium species, variety, agricultural conditions, and the specific extraction process used, as all of these factors influence the content and profile of bioactive compounds.

This Special Issue is devoted to discussing the many health benefits and traditional uses of species in the Allium genus from a pharmacological perspective, as well as the safety/toxicological profile. Innovative cultivation methods of Allium species and their impact on the composition of biologically active substance synthesis as well as production are also welcomed. More detailed research on these species will open the door to an infinite number of possibilities.

Dr. Nikola Major
Dr. Smiljana Goreta Ban
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Allium species
  • Allium extracts
  • cultivation method
  • bioactive compound
  • health benefit
  • volatile compounds
  • sensory profile

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

17 pages, 4048 KiB  
Article
Pathogen Eradication in Garlic in the Phytobiome Context: Should We Aim for Complete Cleaning?
by Itay Yarmus, Dana Gelbart, Einat Shemesh-Mayer, Doron Dov Teper, Dana Ment, Adi Faigenboim, Ross Peters and Rina Kamenetsky-Goldstein
Plants 2023, 12(24), 4125; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants12244125 - 10 Dec 2023
Viewed by 971
Abstract
Global food production is challenged by plant pathogens that cause significant crop losses. Fungi, bacteria, and viruses have long threatened sustainable and profitable agriculture. The danger is even higher in vegetatively propagated horticultural crops, such as garlic. Currently, quarantine, rouging infected plants, and [...] Read more.
Global food production is challenged by plant pathogens that cause significant crop losses. Fungi, bacteria, and viruses have long threatened sustainable and profitable agriculture. The danger is even higher in vegetatively propagated horticultural crops, such as garlic. Currently, quarantine, rouging infected plants, and control of natural vectors are used as the main means of disease and pest control in garlic crops. Agricultural biotechnology, meristem-tip culture, and cryotherapy offer solutions for virus eradication and for the multiplication of ‘clean stocks’, but at the same time, impact the symbiotic and beneficial components of the garlic microbiome. Our research involves the first metatranscriptomic analysis of the microbiome of garlic bulb tissue, PCR analyses, and a biological assay of endophytes and pathogens. We have demonstrated that in vitro sanitation methods, such as shoot tip culture or cryotherapy can alter the garlic microbiome. Shoot tip culture proved ineffective in virus elimination, but reduced bacterial load and eliminated fungal infections. Conversely, cryotherapy was efficient in virus eradication but demolished other components of the garlic microbiome. Garlic plants sanitized by cryotherapy exhibited a lower survival rate, and a longer in vitro regeneration period. The question arises whether total eradication of viruses, at the expense of other microflora, is necessary, or if a partial reduction in the pathogenic load would suffice for sanitized garlic production. We explore this question from both scientific and commercial perspectives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Species from the Allium Genus: Cultivation and Food Chemistry)
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