Special Issue "Community Pharmacy Minor Ailment Services"

A special issue of Pharmacy (ISSN 2226-4787).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 August 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Hamde Nazar
Website
Guest Editor
School of Pharmacy, Newcastle University, Newcastle, NE1 7RU, UK
Interests: health service; pharmacy education research

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Community pharmacy minor ailment services are of current interest in many Western countries, including the UK, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. Historically, these services have lacked standardised structural and implementation characteristics that have impeded more widespread adoption. The management of minor illness remains a topic of healthcare interest, as health-seeking behaviours of patients and the public are reaching unprecedented levels causing significant and, in many cases, inappropriate burdens on the range of healthcare services available. Specifically in England, a new Community Pharmacy Contractual Framework has been negotiated that commits to financially supporting community pharmacy in the delivery of new clinical services, one of which includes the promotion of community pharmacy in the management of minor illness. The aim is to better capitalise on the expertise and resource in community pharmacy and thus shift demand away from the overburdened urgent and emergency care sector. This context provides the backdrop for this Special Issue on Community Pharmacy Minor Ailment Services, where researchers are invited to contribute to the debates, evidence and innovations in this area.

Dr. Hamde Nazar
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Pharmacy is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Minor conditions
  • Minor ailments
  • Minor illness
  • Low acuity conditions
  • Self-care

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Improving Management of Respiratory Tract Infections in Community Pharmacies and Promoting Antimicrobial Stewardship: A Cluster Randomised Control Trial with a Self-Report Behavioural Questionnaire and Process Evaluation
Pharmacy 2020, 8(1), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmacy8010044 - 19 Mar 2020
Abstract
In England, 81% of all antibiotic prescriptions originate in primary care/community settings, of which up to 20% are thought to be inappropriate. Community pharmacies are often the first point of community contact for patients with suspected infections; providing an opportunity for community pharmacy [...] Read more.
In England, 81% of all antibiotic prescriptions originate in primary care/community settings, of which up to 20% are thought to be inappropriate. Community pharmacies are often the first point of community contact for patients with suspected infections; providing an opportunity for community pharmacy teams to promote antimicrobial stewardship (AMS). The objective of the study was to improve the management of infections and antimicrobial stewardship in community pharmacies. The study methodology included a non-blinded cluster randomised control trial with pharmacy staff in 272 community pharmacies in England. The intervention arm received an AMS webinar and a patient facing respiratory tract infection (RTI) leaflet (TARGET TYI-RTI) for use in everyday practice for four weeks. The control arm received a webinar on how to participate in the study. The primary outcome was self-reported referrals to general practitioners (GPs). The secondary outcomes were; provision of self-care advice/ written information to patients, referrals to pharmacists, sign-posting to non-prescription medicines and common barriers and facilitators to advice-giving in community pharmacies. Ethics approval was granted by the Public Health England Research Ethics and Governance Group. 66.91% (182 of 272) of pharmacies provided 3649 patient consultation data reports across both arms. Use of the leaflet was associated with a lower likelihood of referrals to GPs for certain RTIs (p < 0.05) and a more frequent provision of self-care advice than the control (p = 0.06). Opportunities to deliver self-care advice were limited due to lack of time. Pharmacy staff had good motivation and capability for managing self-limiting infections but the opportunity to do so was a perceived barrier. Use of the TARGET leaflet facilitated pharmacy staff to give more self-care advice and decreased referrals to GPs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Community Pharmacy Minor Ailment Services)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop