Special Issue "Advanced Micro and Nano Drug Delivery Systems Designed for Cancer Therapy"

A special issue of Pharmaceutics (ISSN 1999-4923). This special issue belongs to the section "Drug Delivery and Controlled Release".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 August 2022 | Viewed by 1791

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Daria Trushina
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Biomedical Engineering Department, First Moscow State Medical University (Sechenov University), 119991 Moscow, Russia
Interests: drug delivery; cancer therapy; crystallization; encapsulation; nanoparticles; triggered release; biopolymers
Dr. Alexey Ermakov
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Biomedical Engineering Department, First Moscow State Medical University (Sechenov University), 119991 Moscow, Russia
Interests: biomaterials; microcontainers; nanoparticles; encapsulation; drug delivery
Dr. Olga Sindeeva
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Skolkovo Innovation Center, Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, 3 Nobel Str., 143005 Moscow, Russia
Interests: biomedical materials; physiology; drug encapsulation; drug release; drug delivery; coatings; lamination; ultrasound; thin films; tissue engineering; cell proliferation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The latest advances in nanomedicine are aimed at targeted delivery of drugs to tumor foci after intravenous administration with the possibility of avoiding excessive accumulation of toxic drugs in normal tissue. The recent successful application of nanostructured particles as delivery vehicles has demonstrated the superior potential of nanostructure-based technology for drug delivery in biomedicine.

This Special Issue addresses the multidisciplinary field and aims to discuss innovative advances in the design and applications of nanostructured systems for cancer diagnosis, imaging, and therapy. We invite authors to report their recently developed inorganic, organic, and composite nano/microparticles for the delivery of anticancer drugs, photosensitizers, siRNA, etc.

Dr. Daria Trushina
Dr. Alexey Ermakov
Dr. Olga Sindeeva
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nano-/microparticles
  • polymer carriers
  • drug delivery
  • imaging
  • biomedicine
  • tumor targeting
  • photodynamic therapy

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Doxorubicin-Loaded Core–Shell [email protected]2 Metal–Organic Frameworks for Targeted Cellular Uptake and Cancer Treatment
Pharmaceutics 2022, 14(7), 1325; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics14071325 - 23 Jun 2022
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Abstract
Beneficial features of biocompatible high-capacity UiO-66 nanoparticles, mesoporous SiO2, and folate-conjugated pluronic F127 were combined to prepare the core–shell [email protected]2/F127-FA drug delivery carrier for targeted cellular uptake in cancer treatment. UiO-66 and UiO-66-NH2 nanoparticles with a narrow size [...] Read more.
Beneficial features of biocompatible high-capacity UiO-66 nanoparticles, mesoporous SiO2, and folate-conjugated pluronic F127 were combined to prepare the core–shell [email protected]2/F127-FA drug delivery carrier for targeted cellular uptake in cancer treatment. UiO-66 and UiO-66-NH2 nanoparticles with a narrow size and shape distribution were used to form a series of core–shell [email protected]2 structures. The duration of silanization was varied to change the thickness of the SiO2 shell, revealing a nonlinear dependence that was attributed to silicon penetration into the porous MOF structure. Doxorubicin encapsulation showed a similar final loading of 5.6 wt % for both uncoated and silica-coated particles, demonstrating the potential of the nanocomposite’s application in small molecule delivery. Silica coating improved the colloidal stability of the composites in a number of model physiological media, enabled grafting of target molecules to the surface, and prevented an uncontrolled release of their cargo, with the drawback of decreased overall porosity. Further modification of the particles with the conjugate of pluronic and folic acid was performed to improve the biocompatibility, prolong the blood circulation time, and target the encapsulated drug to the folate-expressing cancer cells. The final DOX-loaded [email protected]2/F127-FA nanoparticles were subjected to properties characterization and in vitro evaluation, including studies of internalization into cells and antitumor activity. Two cell lines were used: MCF-7 breast cancer cells, which have overexpressed folate receptors on the cell membranes, and RAW 264.7 macrophages without folate overexpression. These findings will provide a potential delivery system for DOX and increase the practical value of MOFs. Full article
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Article
Renal Artery Catheterization for Microcapsules’ Targeted Delivery to the Mouse Kidney
Pharmaceutics 2022, 14(5), 1056; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics14051056 - 14 May 2022
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Abstract
The problem of reducing the side effects associated with drug distribution throughout the body in the treatment of various kidney diseases can be solved by effective targeted drug delivery. The method described herein involves injection of a drug encapsulated in polyelectrolyte capsules to [...] Read more.
The problem of reducing the side effects associated with drug distribution throughout the body in the treatment of various kidney diseases can be solved by effective targeted drug delivery. The method described herein involves injection of a drug encapsulated in polyelectrolyte capsules to achieve prolonged local release and long-term capillary retention of several hours while these capsules are administered via the renal artery. The proposed method does not imply disruption (puncture) of the renal artery or aorta and is suitable for long-term chronic experiments on mice. In this study, we compared how capsule size and dosage affect the target kidney blood flow. It has been established that an increase in the diameter of microcapsules by 29% (from 3.1 to 4.0 μm) requires a decrease in their concentration by at least 50% with the same suspension volume. The photoacoustic method, along with laser speckle contrast imaging, was shown to be useful for monitoring blood flow and selecting a safe dose. Capsules contribute to a longer retention of a macromolecular substance in the target kidney compared to its free form due to mechanical retention in capillaries and slow impregnation into surrounding tissues during the first 1–3 h, which was shown by fluorescence tomography and microscopy. At the same time, the ability of capillaries to perform almost complete “self-cleaning” from capsular shells during the first 12 h leads to the preservation of organ tissues in a normal state. The proposed strategy, which combines endovascular surgery and the injection of polymer microcapsules containing the active substance, can be successfully used to treat a wide range of nephropathies. Full article
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Review

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Review
Microbubbles Stabilized by Protein Shell: From Pioneering Ultrasound Contrast Agents to Advanced Theranostic Systems
Pharmaceutics 2022, 14(6), 1236; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics14061236 - 10 Jun 2022
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Abstract
Ultrasound is a widely-used imaging modality in clinics as a low-cost, non-invasive, non-radiative procedure allowing therapists faster decision-making. Microbubbles have been used as ultrasound contrast agents for decades, while recent attention has been attracted to consider them as stimuli-responsive drug delivery systems. Pioneering [...] Read more.
Ultrasound is a widely-used imaging modality in clinics as a low-cost, non-invasive, non-radiative procedure allowing therapists faster decision-making. Microbubbles have been used as ultrasound contrast agents for decades, while recent attention has been attracted to consider them as stimuli-responsive drug delivery systems. Pioneering microbubbles were Albunex with a protein shell composed of human serum albumin, which entered clinical practice in 1993. However, current research expanded the set of proteins for a microbubble shell beyond albumin and applications of protein microbubbles beyond ultrasound imaging. Hence, this review summarizes all-known protein microbubbles over decades with a critical evaluation of formulations and applications to optimize the safety (low toxicity and high biocompatibility) as well as imaging efficiency. We provide a comprehensive overview of (1) proteins involved in microbubble formulation, (2) peculiarities of preparation of protein stabilized microbubbles with consideration of large-scale production, (3) key chemical factors of stabilization and functionalization of protein-shelled microbubbles, and (4) biomedical applications beyond ultrasound imaging (multimodal imaging, drug/gene delivery with attention to anticancer treatment, antibacterial activity, biosensing). Presented critical evaluation of the current state-of-the-art for protein microbubbles should focus the field on relevant strategies in microbubble formulation and application for short-term clinical translation. Thus, a protein bubble-based platform is very perspective for theranostic application in clinics. Full article
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