Oral Health in the Global South

A special issue of Oral (ISSN 2673-6373).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 May 2024 | Viewed by 4847

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Oral Health Policy and Epidemiology, Harvard University School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA, USA
Interests: genetic epidemiology; infectious epidemiology; statistical genetics; cancer epidemiology; smokeless tobacco; clinical trials in periodontology and implant dentistry; quality of systematic reviews; and meta-analysis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
School of Health and Life Sciences, Teesside University, Middlesbrough TS1 3BX, UK
Interests: oral cancer; tobacco; alcohol; oral infection; oral and dental injury; sociobehavioural science; healthcare service; health policy; health administration; health education; health promotion; school health; rural health; global oral health; bibliometric analysis; systematic review; comprehensive narrative review
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Health and Life Sciences, Teesside University, Middlesbrough TS1 3BX, UK
Interests: oral cancer; tobacco; alcohol; oral infection; sociobehavioural science; healthcare service; health policy; health administration; health education; health promotion; school health; global oral health; bibliometric analysis; systematic review; comprehensive narrative review

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is a common saying that health is incomplete without oral health. This is true, as the mouth serves as a mirror of the body’s state of health, and as well the gateway to the body. Dental care professionals and public health/policy specialists play a very crucial role in ensuring the good oral health profile of the general population.

According to a recent report by the World Health Organization, there is an unequal distribution of the dental workforce globally. Based on the report, it was understood that the majority of the dental health workforce are in the Global North, while only very few are in the Global South. For example, only 1% of the total population of dentists are in Africa. Overall, this shows that there is a huge inequality gap in global oral healthcare.

Worisomely, a very recent report by the Global Burden of Disease Study Group revealed that about half of the world population experience diverse oral conditions. This group’s report, coupled with several other reports, further established that the burden of these oral conditions is concentrated in countries in the Global South. This is also another area of inequality that needs to be addressed.

The aim of this Special Issue is to create a collection of papers that address diverse areas of dental public health (community dentistry) with a focus on global health. Submissions regarding, but not limited to, oral epidemiology, oral health policy, oral health education, dental workforce development, dental care professions education, dental health insurance, neglected tropical oral diseases, and dental sociology are highly welcome.

Diverse manuscript types, including comprehensive narrative reviews, systematic reviews, bibliometric analyses, surveys, randomized control trials, commentaries, letters to editors, etc., can be submitted to this Special Issue.

Dr. Zuhair Natto
Dr. Kehinde Kazeem Kanmodi
Dr. Lawrence Achilles Nnyanzi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Oral is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • oral and dental injury
  • sociobehavioural science
  • oral healthcare service
  • oral health policy and administration
  • oral health education and promotion
  • global oral health
  • oral disease prevention
  • oral epidemiology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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17 pages, 804 KiB  
Article
Factors Determining the Willingness of Nigerian Clinicians to Recommend Protected Oral Sex: An Online Exploratory Study
by Kehinde Kazeem Kanmodi, Jacob Njideka Nwafor, Ugochukwu Anthony Eze, Babatunde Abiodun Amoo, Afeez Abolarinwa Salami, Bello Almu, Mike Eghosa Ogbeide, Precious Ehi Obute, Timothy Aladelusi, Oladimeji Adebayo and Lawrence Achilles Nnyanzi
Oral 2022, 2(4), 299-315; https://doi.org/10.3390/oral2040029 - 15 Dec 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2240
Abstract
Oral sex, a risky sexual behaviour, is now a common sexual behaviour in Nigeria. Nigerian clinicians play crucial roles in the promotion of healthy sexual behaviours among the lay public. This study seeks to identify those factors that determine the willingness of Nigerian [...] Read more.
Oral sex, a risky sexual behaviour, is now a common sexual behaviour in Nigeria. Nigerian clinicians play crucial roles in the promotion of healthy sexual behaviours among the lay public. This study seeks to identify those factors that determine the willingness of Nigerian clinicians to recommend protected oral sex to patients with history of oral sex practice. This study surveyed 330 clinicians in Nigeria, using an e-questionnaire circulated via WhatsApp and Telegram. The collected data were analysed using SPSS version 21 software. The majority (89.1%) of the respondents were willing to recommend protected oral sex for patients engaging in oral sex. Amidst all of the factors (sociodemographic factors, sexual history, etc.) investigated, only one factor (which was the uncertainty about the risk level of oral sex) was found to predict the willingness to recommend protective measures to patients on oral sex (OR = 3.06, p = 0.036). In conclusion, only few factors were found to influence Nigerian clinicians in engaging in patient education on safer oral sex practices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Health in the Global South)
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17 pages, 1543 KiB  
Review
Oral Cancer Disease among the Poor: A Sri Lankan Context
by Kalpani Senevirathna, Yovanthi Anurangi Jayasinghe, Shalindu Malshan Jayawickrama, Hemantha Amarasinghe and Ruwan Duminda Jayasinghe
Oral 2023, 3(3), 420-436; https://doi.org/10.3390/oral3030034 - 04 Sep 2023
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Abstract
Oral cancer (OC) is the 16th most common cancer worldwide. In Sri Lanka, OC is the most prevalent cancer among men and the eighth among women. In most instances, OC is preceded by clinically recognizable disorders appearing on the oral mucosa, termed oral [...] Read more.
Oral cancer (OC) is the 16th most common cancer worldwide. In Sri Lanka, OC is the most prevalent cancer among men and the eighth among women. In most instances, OC is preceded by clinically recognizable disorders appearing on the oral mucosa, termed oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD). The distribution of OC among low- and middle-income socioeconomic groups contributes to various factors. Poor oral health literacy, a lower quality of higher education, and the economic burden results in neglected oral health. The further economic recession has led to the formation of risk habits, such as chewing betel quid, smoking and the consumption of alcohol, among these groups to minimize stress levels. But with a lack of oral health awareness, the incidences of OC increase in this category. This review elaborates on a few cross-sectional studies conducted in various locations in Sri Lanka, discussing the low awareness of neglected oral health, the usage of tobacco in a smokeless and non-smokeless manner, consuming alcohol, and the chewing of betel nuts. This review aims to overcome the barriers in these low- and middle-income socioeconomic groups in developing nations such as Sri Lanka by creating more awareness and minimizing the incidence and diagnosis and treatment at early stages to improve the quality of life as well as longevity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Health in the Global South)
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