Special Issue "Dairy Nutrients"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 January 2011) | Viewed by 25636

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Zeynep Ustunol
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Michigan State University, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, 2105 S. Anthony Hall, E. Lansing, MI 48824, USA
Interests: pre- and probiotics and immune modulation by probiotic bacteria, yogurt and other fermented dairy foods; milk, milk proteins and bioactive components derived from milk; soy; soy isoflavones and health

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
The Serum Metabolite Response to Diet Intervention with Probiotic Acidified Milk in Irritable Bowel Syndrome Patients Is Indistinguishable from that of Non-Probiotic Acidified Milk by 1H NMR-Based Metabonomic Analysis
Nutrients 2010, 2(11), 1141-1155; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu2111141 - 23 Nov 2010
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 6496
Abstract
The effects of a probiotic acidified milk product on the blood serum metabolite profile of patients suffering from Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) compared to a non-probiotic acidified milk product was investigated using 1H NMR metabonomics. For eight weeks, IBS patients consumed 0.4 [...] Read more.
The effects of a probiotic acidified milk product on the blood serum metabolite profile of patients suffering from Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) compared to a non-probiotic acidified milk product was investigated using 1H NMR metabonomics. For eight weeks, IBS patients consumed 0.4 L per day of a probiotic fermented milk product or non-probiotic acidified milk. Both diets resulted in elevated levels of blood serum l-lactate and 3-hydroxybutyrate. Our results showed identical effects of acidified milk consumption independent of probiotic addition. A similar result was previously obtained in a questionnaire-based evaluation of symptom relief. A specific probiotic effect is thus absent both in the patient subjective symptom evaluations and at the blood serum metabolite level. However, there was no correspondence between symptom relief and metabolite response on the patient level. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dairy Nutrients)
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Review

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Review
Perspectives on Immunoglobulins in Colostrum and Milk
Nutrients 2011, 3(4), 442-474; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu3040442 - 14 Apr 2011
Cited by 356 | Viewed by 18952
Abstract
Immunoglobulins form an important component of the immunological activity found in milk and colostrum. They are central to the immunological link that occurs when the mother transfers passive immunity to the offspring. The mechanism of transfer varies among mammalian species. Cattle provide a [...] Read more.
Immunoglobulins form an important component of the immunological activity found in milk and colostrum. They are central to the immunological link that occurs when the mother transfers passive immunity to the offspring. The mechanism of transfer varies among mammalian species. Cattle provide a readily available immune rich colostrum and milk in large quantities, making those secretions important potential sources of immune products that may benefit humans. Immune milk is a term used to describe a range of products of the bovine mammary gland that have been tested against several human diseases. The use of colostrum or milk as a source of immunoglobulins, whether intended for the neonate of the species producing the secretion or for a different species, can be viewed in the context of the types of immunoglobulins in the secretion, the mechanisms by which the immunoglobulins are secreted, and the mechanisms by which the neonate or adult consuming the milk then gains immunological benefit. The stability of immunoglobulins as they undergo processing in the milk, or undergo digestion in the intestine, is an additional consideration for evaluating the value of milk immunoglobulins. This review summarizes the fundamental knowledge of immunoglobulins found in colostrum, milk, and immune milk. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dairy Nutrients)
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