Special Issue "The Double Burden of Malnutrition"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 December 2019.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. José L Peñalvo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Non-communicable Diseases Unit, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium
Interests: noncommunicable diseases; lifestyle; diet; epidemiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The coexistence of undernutrition along with overweight and obesity, and diet-related noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) is known as the double burden of malnutrition. Demographic shits, rapid economic growth, unplanned urbanization, and cultural globalization are the main causes of these contrasting forms of malnutrition and the accelerated rise of NCDs observed across low- and middle-income countries. In these settings, while undernutrition and stunting remain highly prevalent, the burden of malnutrition shift progresively to obesity with rising country income and unseemly nutrition transitions. This complex intersection may take place at the population, household or individual level, and at different times throughout the lifecourse. Furthermore,  low-income strata and women withstand a significantly higher risk of double burden, hence potentially worsening the health disparity gap between gender, and income levels.

Althought the determinants of the onset of the double burden of malnutrition are dependent on the setting and underlying socio-economic drivers, the outcomes of this double threat represent a public health priority. The notion of double-duty actions incorporate interventions and strategies capable of tackling simultaneously manutrition in all forms. These strategies offer a unique opportunity for integrated approaches that can contribute to the realization of SDGs, and curbing global NCDs burden.

For this special issue of Nutrients, we welcome research reporting the quantification of the double burden of malnutrition at the individual, community, or country level. Manuscripts dealing with the development and implementation, and evaluation of direct and integrated interventions to tackle malnutrition and improving the nutritional status and health of vulnerable populations, are particularly appreciated.

Prof. José L Peñalvo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • malnutrition
  • noncommunicable diseases
  • double burden
  • double-duty actions

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Nutrition Transition in the Post-Economic Crisis of Greece: Assessing the Nutritional Gap of Food-Insecure Individuals. A Cross-Sectional Study
Nutrients 2019, 11(12), 2914; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11122914 - 02 Dec 2019
Abstract
Food insecurity has risen by 40% in Europe’s post-economic crisis, linked to the economic turmoil and austerity. Despite the intensification of efforts to fight all forms of poverty, including the implementation of programs targeted to the most deprived, the study of individuals at [...] Read more.
Food insecurity has risen by 40% in Europe’s post-economic crisis, linked to the economic turmoil and austerity. Despite the intensification of efforts to fight all forms of poverty, including the implementation of programs targeted to the most deprived, the study of individuals at risk of food insecurity has been largely neglected. This study aimed to map the nutritional habits and needs of the most deprived in Greece, one of the countries most affected by the economic crisis. Individuals classified as most deprived under the Fund for the European Aid to the Most Deprived (FEAD) criteria (n = 499) from across Greece and an age matched control from the general population (n = 500) were interviewed between December 2017 and December 2019. Participants provided information about demographic characteristics, and self-reported anthropometric measures and nutritional intake of the past month via a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ). Protein and energy malnutrition were defined as daily intake <1.950 kcal and ≤0.75 g/kg body-weight accordingly. Protein and energy malnutrition were high among FEAD recipients (52.3% and 18.6% respectively, p < 0.001), alongside a high prevalence of overweight and obesity (BMI > 25: 68.4% versus 55.1%; p < 0.001). The diet of FEAD recipients included higher amounts of carbohydrates, lower amounts of monounsaturated fat (MUFA) and polyunsaturated fat (PUFA; p < 0.001 compared to control), larger amounts of plant-based proteins (5.81 ± 1.7 versus 4.94 ± 1.3% E respectively, p < 0.001) and very limited intake of fish (0.07 portions/day). Despite being enrolled in a food assistance program, protein and energy malnutrition is prevalent among Greece’s most deprived who experience not only lower diet quality but also the double burden of malnutrition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Double Burden of Malnutrition)
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Open AccessArticle
Malnutrition-Inflammation Score VS Phase Angle in the Era of GLIM Criteria: A Cross-Sectional Study among Hemodialysis Patients in UAE
Nutrients 2019, 11(11), 2771; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112771 - 14 Nov 2019
Abstract
(1) Background: Malnutrition is prevalent in hemodialysis (HD) patients and is associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence of malnutrition using the malnutrition-inflammation score (MIS) and phase angle (PhA) and compare [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Malnutrition is prevalent in hemodialysis (HD) patients and is associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence of malnutrition using the malnutrition-inflammation score (MIS) and phase angle (PhA) and compare their concordance with the new Global Leadership Initiative on Malnutrition (GLIM) criteria for the diagnosis of malnutrition. (2) Methods: Seventy HD patients were assessed. Malnutrition was diagnosed based on the GLIM criteria and MIS questionnaire. The agreement between the diagnostic tools (MIS, PhA derived from the bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), and GLIM criteria) was assessed. The optimal gender-specific cutoff points were identified for the PhA according to the GLIM criteria. (3) Results: Almost half of the sample was diagnosed as malnourished according to the MIS (48.57%) and GLIM criteria (54.29%). A fair agreement was observed between the GLIM criteria, MIS (k = 0.202), and PhA (k = 0.279) among the malnourished patients. The PhA had better sensitivity but worse specificity compared to the MIS. The optimum cutoff points of PhA to detect malnutrition according to the GLIM criteria were a PhA value of ≤5.7° for males and ≤3.8° for females. (4) Conclusion: The MIS performed slightly better than PhA in the diagnosis of malnutrition among HD patients within the spectrum of the GLIM criteria. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Double Burden of Malnutrition)
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Open AccessArticle
Dietary Patterns and the Double Burden of Malnutrition in Mexican Adolescents: Results from ENSANUT-2006
Nutrients 2019, 11(11), 2753; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11112753 - 13 Nov 2019
Abstract
Mexico is facing the double burden of malnutrition, and adolescents are not an exception. Diet plays an important role, both in causing overweight and undernutrition. This study aimed to describe the dietary patterns (DPs) of Mexican adolescents and to examine its association with [...] Read more.
Mexico is facing the double burden of malnutrition, and adolescents are not an exception. Diet plays an important role, both in causing overweight and undernutrition. This study aimed to describe the dietary patterns (DPs) of Mexican adolescents and to examine its association with nutritional status using data from adolescents aged 12–19 years (n = 7380) from the National Survey of Health and Nutrition (ENSANUT-2006). Principal component analysis was used to derivate the DPs. Associations between DP and nutritional status were determined by prevalence ratio (PR). Four DPs were identified: nontraditional and breakfast-type, Western, plant-based, and protein-rich. The prevalence of overweight and obesity was higher in adolescents who scored high on the Western pattern (PR: 1.15, 95% CI: 1.08–1.21) or on the plant-based pattern (PR: 1.09, 95% CI: 1.03–1.17). The Western pattern was positively associated with anemia in girls (PR: 1.18, 95% CI: 1.03–1.35), while the nontraditional and breakfast-type pattern was inversely associated with anemia in adolescents aged 12–15 years (PR: 0.87, 95% CI: 0.76–0.99) and in girls (PR: 0.84, 95% CI: 0.75–0.97). The Western and plant-based patterns were simultaneously associated with overweight–obesity and at least one indicator of undernutrition. In the context of the double burden of malnutrition, dietary advice must consider malnutrition in all its forms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Double Burden of Malnutrition)
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