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Sleep, Fatigue and Recovery: Current Update on Nutrition and Chrononutrition

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 April 2024) | Viewed by 13046

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 8ST, UK
Interests: leep; Insomnia; PER3

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Guest Editor
Sport Ireland Institute, National Sport Campus, Abbotstown, 15, D15 Y52H Dublin, Ireland
Interests: athletes; chrononutrition; sleep

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Guest Editor
Department of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, University of Limerick, V94 T9PX Limerick, Ireland
Interests: exercise science; sports science; nutrition; training; bone metabolism; sleep deprivation

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Co-Guest Editor
Sports Lab North West, Letterkenny Institute of Technology, F92 FC93 Letterkenny, Ireland
Interests: sports nutrition; sleep; athlete recovery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Research relating to sleep, nutrition, and interactions between sleep and nutrition has increased steadily in the last decade. Chrononutrition is becoming an area of increased interest in relation to nutrition and circadian system interactions. Neurotransmitters in the brain such as serotonin, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), orexin, melanin-concentrating hormone, cholinergic, galanin, noradrenaline and histamine are involved in the sleep–wake cycle. Nutritional interventions that act upon these neurotransmitters may influence sleep, while dietary precursors can influence the rate of synthesis and function of neurotransmitters. An understanding of circadian changes in the digestive system thus enables the optimal timing of food, meaning that humans can alter the timing of their ‘internal clock’ by manipulating the timing of food intake. Sleep deprivation can also impact appetite and glucose metabolism due to the influence of the leptin (appetite suppressant) and ghrelin (stimulates appetite) that may be produced by the pituitary–hypothalamus axis.

The aim of this Special Issue is to update knowledge on sleep, nutrition and chrononutrition. We welcome different types of manuscript submissions, including original research articles and up-to-date reviews (systematic reviews and meta-analyses).

Prof. Dr. Jason Ellis
Prof. Dr. Sharon Madigan
Dr. Giles Warrington
Dr. Rónán Doherty
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sleep
  • nutrition
  • chrononutrition
  • special populations
  • athletes
  • circadian rhythms
  • fatigue
  • recovery
  • central nervous system
  • sports
  • exercise
  • performance
  • skeletal muscle

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

9 pages, 553 KiB  
Article
Efficacy of Poria Cocos Extract on Sleep Quality Enhancement: A Clinical Perspective with Implications for Functional Foods
by Hyeyun Kim, Heeyong Choi, Byong-Gon Park, Hyo-Jin Ju and Yeong-In Kim
Nutrients 2023, 15(19), 4242; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15194242 - 01 Oct 2023
Viewed by 2407
Abstract
Background: Since the outbreak of the pandemic started, an increase in the number of sleep disorders, including insomnia and poor sleep quality, has been seen. The pattern will probably continue. Methods: This study focuses on the preparation and clinical testing of Poria cocos [...] Read more.
Background: Since the outbreak of the pandemic started, an increase in the number of sleep disorders, including insomnia and poor sleep quality, has been seen. The pattern will probably continue. Methods: This study focuses on the preparation and clinical testing of Poria cocos extract in treating suboptimal sleep quality. The optimal extraction method utilized a 75% ethanol concentration, and the clinical investigation involved subjects with defined poor sleep taking 800 mg of the extract nightly, assessed using the Sleep Questionnaire and polysomnography. The non-parametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for statistical analysis due to the non-normal distribution of the collected data. Results: The study involved 21 insomnia sufferers with a mean age of 55 who were administered Poria cocos extracts. The findings of the study indicate a statistically significant rise in the overall duration of sleep (from 327.395 ± 43.2 min to 356.516 ± 63.21 min, p = 0.014). Additionally, there was a notable decrease in the level of arousal during sleep (from 76.316 ± 44.78 min to 47.989 ± 42.38 min, p = 0.009), and an improvement in the sleep severity index of the sleep questionnaire test. Conclusions: Poria cocos as a natural substance could improve quality of sleep, based on the findings. The study investigates Pachymic acid, a substance found in Poria cocos, as a potential indicator for the development of sleeping aids. Full article
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19 pages, 4429 KiB  
Article
The Impact of Kiwifruit Consumption on the Sleep and Recovery of Elite Athletes
by Rónán Doherty, Sharon Madigan, Alan Nevill, Giles Warrington and Jason Gordon Ellis
Nutrients 2023, 15(10), 2274; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu15102274 - 11 May 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 9661
Abstract
Background: Poor sleep and resultant under-recovery can negatively impact training adaptations, increase the risk of injury and reduce subsequent performance. Due to the ‘food first’ approach adopted by many athletes, there is scope for investigation of ‘functional food’ based interventions (i.e., kiwifruit contains [...] Read more.
Background: Poor sleep and resultant under-recovery can negatively impact training adaptations, increase the risk of injury and reduce subsequent performance. Due to the ‘food first’ approach adopted by many athletes, there is scope for investigation of ‘functional food’ based interventions (i.e., kiwifruit contains melatonin which plays a role in circadian rhythm regulation) designed to promote athlete recovery and/or enhance sleep quality and quantity. Methods: Following the baseline assessment (Week 1) all subjects began the intervention (Weeks 2–5). During the 4-week intervention, participants were asked to consume 2 medium-sized green kiwifruit (Actinidia Deliciosa) an hour before bed. Participants completed a questionnaire battery at baseline and post-intervention, and a daily sleep dairy for the duration of the study. Results: The results demonstrated a positive impact of kiwifruit consumption on key aspects of sleep and recovery in elite athletes. From baseline to post-intervention, there were clinically significant improvements in sleep quality (i.e., improved PSQI global scores and sleep quality component scores) and improvements in recovery stress balance (reduced general stress and sports stress scales). Moreover, the intervention improved sleep as evidenced by significant increases in total sleep time and sleep efficiency % and significant reductions in number of awakenings and wake after sleep onset. Conclusion: The findings broadly suggested that kiwifruit does impact positively on sleep and recovery in elite athletes. Full article
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