Special Issue "The Impact of Altered Taste Perception in the Most Common Chronic Diseases of the Elderly"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 May 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Arianna Vignini
Website
Guest Editor
Universita Politecnica delle Marche, Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Biochemistry Biology and Physics, Ancona, Italy.
Interests: nitric oxide and its metabolism; oxidative stress; diabetes; obesity; eating disorders; neurodegenerative diseases; infertility; functional food; taste sensitivity
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Population ageing has emerged as a major demographic trend worldwide and presents a huge burden due to improved health and longevity. As the ageing population increases, there is an increasing awareness not only of increased longevity but also of the importance of "healthy ageing" and "quality of life".

Aging may coincide with a declining gustatory function that can affect dietary intake and ultimately have negative health consequences. Taste loss is caused by physiological changes and worsened by events often associated with aging, and the risk of becoming malnourished increases. Chronic diseases, which tend to become more common with age, include neurodegenerative diseases (Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases), cancer, and oral health problems that in turn may lead to changes in taste function and thereby alter flavor perception and eating behavior.

We invite authors to submit original research and up-to-date reviews (narrative and systematic reviews, as well as meta-analyses) that seek to define the role played by nutrition in healthy aging, as well as the role played by the alteration of taste in food choice and food intake in the elderly. We are also interested in articles describing how diet and nutrition might be important modifiable risk factors for age-relate chronic diseases. Studies with multidisciplinary input are particularly welcome.

Prof. Arianna Vignini
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • taste
  • healthy aging
  • neurodegenerative disease
  • cancer
  • oral health problems
  • malnutrition

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Association between Sour Taste SNP KCNJ2-rs236514, Diet Quality and Mild Cognitive Impairment in an Elderly Cohort
Nutrients 2021, 13(3), 719; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13030719 - 24 Feb 2021
Viewed by 160
Abstract
Differences in sour-taste thresholds have been identified in cognition-related diseases. Diet is a modulator of cognitive health, and taste perception influences dietary preferences and habits. Heritable genetics and polymorphisms in the KCNJ2 gene involved in the transduction of sour taste have been linked [...] Read more.
Differences in sour-taste thresholds have been identified in cognition-related diseases. Diet is a modulator of cognitive health, and taste perception influences dietary preferences and habits. Heritable genetics and polymorphisms in the KCNJ2 gene involved in the transduction of sour taste have been linked to variations in sour taste and non-gustatory functions. However, relationships between sour taste genetics, mild cognitive impairment, and diet quality are yet to be elucidated. This study investigated the associations between the presence of the KCNJ2-rs236514 variant (A) allele, diet quality indices, and mild cognitive impairment evaluated by the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), in a secondary cross-sectional analysis of data from the Retirement Health & Lifestyle Study. Data from 524 elderly Australians (≥65y) were analyzed, using standard least squares regression and nominal logistic regression modeling, with demographic adjustments applied. Results showed that the presence of the KCNJ2-A allele is associated with increased proportions of participants scoring in the range indicative of mild or more severe cognitive impairment (MMSE score of ≤26) in the total cohort, and males. These associations remained statistically significant after adjusting for age, sex, and diet quality indices. The absence of association between the KCNJ2-A allele and cognitive impairment in women may be related to their higher diet quality scores in all indices. The potential link between sour taste genotype and cognitive impairment scores may be due to both oral and extra-oral functions of sour taste receptors. Further studies are required on the role and relationship of neurotransmitters, sour taste genotypes and sour taste receptors in the brain, and dietary implications, to identify potential risk groups or avenues for therapeutic or prophylactic interventions. Full article
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