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Special Issue "Unhealthy Food Consumption and Cancer Risk"

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Victor Moreno
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Oncology Data Analytics Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO). Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain
Interests: cancer prevention; colorectal cancer; chronic diseases; genetic susceptibility; epigenetics; risk models; prognosis; screening; epidemiology; nutrition; gut microbiota; biomarkers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cancer incidence and mortality are speedily increasing worldwide, and with them the global expenditures for cancer care. Following an unhealthy diet is one of the major risk factors for a wide range of chronic conditions, including cancer. Diet is subjective by many social and economic factors, and according to the World Health Organization and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, food consumption patterns and trends in developed countries are shifting towards an unbalanced diet: the consumption of fruit, vegetables, whole grains, and legumes is decreasing, while that of high-energy foods, fats, free sugar and salt, meat, and processed meat is increasing.

The role of healthy foods and/or healthy dietary patterns has been extensively studied; however, in this Special Issue of Nutrients, we would like to provide current scientific evidence regarding the role of unhealthy eating foods, macronutrients, micronutrients or dietary patterns on cancer risk. We encourage authors to consider submitting their research on this topic in the “Unhealthy Foods Consumption and Cancer Risk” Special Issue. Different types of manuscript submissions, including research articles, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses, are welcomed.

Dr. Victor Moreno
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nutrients is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Unhealthy food
  • Unhealthy eating
  • Eating habits
  • Food
  • Beverages
  • Dietary patterns
  • Diet quality
  • Fast foods
  • Processed foods
  • Junk foods
  • High-fat diet
  • Salt
  • Sugar
  • Micronutrients
  • Macronutrients
  • Western pattern
  • Meat–sweet diet
  • Occidental diet
  • Nutrient profile
  • Cancer risk
  • Neoplasia
  • Public health

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Association between Polyphenol Intake and Gastric Cancer Risk by Anatomic and Histologic Subtypes: MCC-Spain
Nutrients 2020, 12(11), 3281; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113281 - 26 Oct 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 789
Abstract
Several anticancer properties have been largely attributed to phenolics in in vivo and in vitro studies, but epidemiologic evidence is still scarce. Furthermore, some classes have not been studied in relation to gastric cancer (GC). The aim of this study was to assess [...] Read more.
Several anticancer properties have been largely attributed to phenolics in in vivo and in vitro studies, but epidemiologic evidence is still scarce. Furthermore, some classes have not been studied in relation to gastric cancer (GC). The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between the intake of phenolic acids, stilbenes, and other phenolics and the risk of developing GC and its anatomical and histological subtypes. We used data from a multi-case-control study (MCC-Spain) obtained from different regions of Spain. We included 2700 controls and 329 GC cases. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated using mixed effects logistic regression considering quartiles of phenolic intake. Our results showed an inverse association between stilbene and lignan intake and GC risk (ORQ4 vs. Q1 = 0.47; 95% CI: 0.32–0.69 and ORQ4 vs. Q1 = 0.53; 95% CI: 0.36–0.77, respectively). We found no overall association between total phenolic acid and other polyphenol class intake and GC risk. However, hydroxybenzaldehydes (ORQ4 vs. Q1 = 0.41; 95% CI: 0.28–0.61), hydroxycoumarins (ORQ4 vs. Q1 = 0.49; 95% CI: 0.34–0.71), and tyrosols (ORQ4 vs. Q1 = 0.56; 95% CI: 0.39–0.80) were inversely associated with GC risk. No differences were found in the analysis by anatomical or histological subtypes. In conclusion, a diet high in stilbenes, lignans, hydroxybenzaldehydes, hydroxycoumarins, and tyrosols was associated with a lower GC risk. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm our results. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Unhealthy Food Consumption and Cancer Risk)
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Article
Association between Polyphenol Intake and Breast Cancer Risk by Menopausal and Hormone Receptor Status
Nutrients 2020, 12(4), 994; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12040994 - 03 Apr 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1281
Abstract
There is limited evidence of phenolic compounds acting as protective agents on several cancer types, including breast cancer (BC). Nevertheless, some polyphenol classes have not been investigated and there is a lack of studies assessing the effect on menopausal status and hormone receptor [...] Read more.
There is limited evidence of phenolic compounds acting as protective agents on several cancer types, including breast cancer (BC). Nevertheless, some polyphenol classes have not been investigated and there is a lack of studies assessing the effect on menopausal status and hormone receptor status as influenced by these compounds. The objective of this study is to evaluate the association between the intake of all polyphenol classes in relation to the BC risk by menopausal and hormone receptor status. We used data from a population-based multi-case-control study (MCC-Spain) including 1472 BC cases and 1577 controls from 12 different regions of Spain. The odds ratios (ORs) with 95% CI were calculated using logistic regression of mixed effects by quartiles and log2 of polyphenol intakes (adjusted for the residual method) of overall BC, menopausal and receptor status. No associations were found between total intake of polyphenols and BC risk. However, inverse associations were found between stilbenes and all BC risk (ORQ4 vs. Q1: 0.70, 95%CI: 0.56–0.89, Ptrend = 0.001), the consumption of hydroxybenzaldehydes (ORQ4 vs. Q1: 0.75, 95%CI: 0.59–0.93, Ptrend = 0.012) and hydroxycoumarins (ORQ4 vs. Q1: 0.73, 95%CI: 0.57–0.93; Ptrend = 0.005) were also inversely associated. The intake of stilbenes, hydroxybenzaldehydes and hydroxycoumarins can contribute to BC reduction risk on all menopausal and receptor statuses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Unhealthy Food Consumption and Cancer Risk)
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