The Role of Nutrition and Supplementation in Cancer Risk and Progression

A special issue of Nutrients (ISSN 2072-6643). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutritional Epidemiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 September 2024 | Viewed by 1065

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
International Hereditary Cancer Center, Department of Genetics and Pathology, Pomeranian Medical University in Szczecin, ul. Unii Lubelskiej 1, 71-252 Szczecin, Poland
Interests: cancer risk; cancer progression; microelements; vitamins; aminoacids; fatty acids; proteins
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The latest advances in oncology are clearly indicating that enormous improvements in cancer risk and progression can be achieved by the optimization of diet. Many ingredients of food including microelements, vitamins, amino and fatty acids, proteins, and others are critical for the effective functioning of the body. There is a lot of attractive data on the influence of diet on cancer risk and progression, but their validation as well as new discoveries are strongly needed. All researchers that are enthusiastic or at least interested in contributing to the progress in oncology based on nutrition and supplementation are welcome to submit original research articles (both intervention and association studies) and reviews (with preference for systematic reviews and meta-analyses) to this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Jan Lubiński
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • cancer risk
  • cancer progression
  • microelements
  • vitamins
  • amino acids
  • fatty acids
  • proteins

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 283 KiB  
Communication
Blood Cadmium Level Is a Marker of Cancer Risk in Men
by Róża Derkacz, Wojciech Marciniak, Piotr Baszuk, Monika Wysokińska, Natalia Chrzanowska, Marcin Lener, Tomasz Huzarski, Jacek Gronwald, Tadeusz Dębniak, Cezary Cybulski, Anna Jakubowska, Rodney J. Scott and Jan Lubiński
Nutrients 2024, 16(9), 1309; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu16091309 - 27 Apr 2024
Viewed by 902
Abstract
Cadmium (Cd) is a known carcinogen, but its impact on cancer risk at lower concentrations is poorly understood. Previous studies on Cd and cancer risk in men show inconsistent results, prompting further investigation. A prospective cohort study involving 2956 men was conducted. Blood [...] Read more.
Cadmium (Cd) is a known carcinogen, but its impact on cancer risk at lower concentrations is poorly understood. Previous studies on Cd and cancer risk in men show inconsistent results, prompting further investigation. A prospective cohort study involving 2956 men was conducted. Blood Cd levels were measured, and participants were followed for 78 months to assess cancer incidence. Men with high blood Cd levels (>0.71 µg/L) had a significantly increased risk of cancer compared to those with low levels (<0.19 µg/L) (HR 3.42, p < 0.001), particularly among non-smokers (HR 3.74, p = 0.003), individuals aged < 60 years (HR 2.79, p = 0.017), and ≥60 (HR 4.63, p = 0.004). The influence of smoking on cancer risk based on Cd levels was not significant in this study. Blood Cd levels may influence cancer risk in men, emphasizing the importance of minimizing Cd exposure to reduce risk. Confirmation of these results in other populations is essential for effective preventive measures against Cd-related cancers. Full article
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