Special Issue "Non-Coding RNA in the Nervous System"

A special issue of Non-Coding RNA (ISSN 2311-553X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. John Mattick
grade Website
Guest Editor
School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, Room 220C, Level 2, Biological Sciences Building (North), UNSW Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia
Interests: RNA biology, human genome, plasticity, regulatory RNA, gene expression
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Non-coding RNA is now accepting submissions for a special issue on the biology of Non-coding RNA in the nervous system. The special issue is guest-edited by Professor John Mattick from the Garvan Institute of Medical Research in Sydney. This Special Issue will also include commissioned topical reviews written by leaders in the field.

One of the big unsolved problems in developmental biology and neuroscience is how the brain is formed and how it functions—how neurons generate and maintain connections between them, how these are lost or modified with aging or in neuropathologies like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, how the brain learns, and what goes wrong in neuropsychiatric conditions, such as autism and bipolar disorder.

The mammalian brain expresses an extraordinarily complex transcriptome, including large numbers of short and long non-coding RNAs that show very precise expression patterns. Many non-coding RNAs are implicated in chromatin organization and epigenetic processes, which are essential for development and brain function. Moreover, there has been an expansion of RNA editing and modification during cognitive evolution, especially in primates, which suggests that such processes may underlie the epigenetic plasticity of the brain.

This is the new frontier. This special issue will group together the latest advances in non-coding RNA studies related to nervous system development, function and plasticity.  

We will consider Research, Methods and Review manuscripts of exceptional interest on the following topics:

  • Non-coding RNAs in neural stem cell biology and neural cell differentiation
  • Discovery of non-coding RNAs involved in nervous system formation and function
  • Functions of non-coding RNAs in brain development and function
  • Structure-function relationships of non-coding RNAs in the nervous system
  • Non-coding RNAs in mental illness and neurodegeneration
  • Pre-clinical and clinical studies investigating the role of ncRNA in neuropathologies

Professor John Mattick
Guest Editor

Please use the online submission system and indicate in your covering letter that you would like to have your manuscript considered for the Special Issue "Non-coding RNA in the nervous system". If you would like to enquire about suitability of your article to this Special Issue please email your pre-submission enquiry to Professor John Mattick ([email protected]).

Submission

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. Papers will be published continuously (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are refereed through a peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Non-Coding RNA is an international peer-reviewed Open Access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Accepted papers are published online immediately after copy editing. Non-Coding RNA is an Open Access journal. There is no Article Processing Charges (APCs) for papers submitted in 2018. English correction and/or formatting fees of 250 CHF (Swiss Francs) will be charged in certain cases for those articles accepted for publication that require extensive additional formatting and/or English corrections.

Keywords

  • neurobiology

  • ncRNA

  • neuropathology

  • neural stem cells

  • neurodegeneration

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

Open AccessArticle
Hypoxia-Induced MicroRNA-210 Targets Neurodegenerative Pathways
Non-Coding RNA 2018, 4(2), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/ncrna4020010 - 27 Mar 2018
Cited by 4
Abstract
Hypoxia-regulated microRNA-210 (miR-210) is a highly conserved microRNA, known to regulate various processes under hypoxic conditions. Previously we found that miR-210 is also involved in honeybee learning and memory, raising the questions of how neural activity may induce hypoxia-regulated genes and how miR-210 [...] Read more.
Hypoxia-regulated microRNA-210 (miR-210) is a highly conserved microRNA, known to regulate various processes under hypoxic conditions. Previously we found that miR-210 is also involved in honeybee learning and memory, raising the questions of how neural activity may induce hypoxia-regulated genes and how miR-210 may regulate plasticity in more complex mammalian systems. Using a pull-down approach, we identified 620 unique target genes of miR-210 in humans, among which there was a significant enrichment of age-related neurodegenerative pathways, including Huntington’s, Alzheimer’s, and Parkinson’s diseases. We have also validated that miR-210 directly regulates various identified target genes of interest involved with neuronal plasticity, neurodegenerative diseases, and miR-210-associated cancers. This data suggests a potentially novel mechanism for how metabolic changes may couple plasticity to neuronal activity through hypoxia-regulated genes such as miR-210. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-Coding RNA in the Nervous System)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

Open AccessReview
Functional Interplay between Small Non-Coding RNAs and RNA Modification in the Brain
Non-Coding RNA 2018, 4(2), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/ncrna4020015 - 07 Jun 2018
Cited by 2
Abstract
Small non-coding RNAs are essential for transcription, translation and gene regulation in all cell types, but are particularly important in neurons, with known roles in neurodevelopment, neuroplasticity and neurological disease. Many small non-coding RNAs are directly involved in the post-transcriptional modification of other [...] Read more.
Small non-coding RNAs are essential for transcription, translation and gene regulation in all cell types, but are particularly important in neurons, with known roles in neurodevelopment, neuroplasticity and neurological disease. Many small non-coding RNAs are directly involved in the post-transcriptional modification of other RNA species, while others are themselves substrates for modification, or are functionally modulated by modification of their target RNAs. In this review, we explore the known and potential functions of several distinct classes of small non-coding RNAs in the mammalian brain, focusing on the newly recognised interplay between the epitranscriptome and the activity of small RNAs. We discuss the potential for this relationship to influence the spatial and temporal dynamics of gene activation in the brain, and predict that further research in the field of epitranscriptomics will identify interactions between small RNAs and RNA modifications which are essential for higher order brain functions such as learning and memory. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-Coding RNA in the Nervous System)
Open AccessReview
Long Non-Coding RNAs in Neuronal Aging
Non-Coding RNA 2018, 4(2), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/ncrna4020012 - 18 Apr 2018
Cited by 18
Abstract
The expansion of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in organismal genomes has been associated with the emergence of sophisticated regulatory networks that may have contributed to more complex neuronal processes, such as higher-order cognition. In line with the important roles of lncRNAs in the [...] Read more.
The expansion of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in organismal genomes has been associated with the emergence of sophisticated regulatory networks that may have contributed to more complex neuronal processes, such as higher-order cognition. In line with the important roles of lncRNAs in the normal functioning of the human brain, dysregulation of lncRNA expression has been implicated in aging and age-related neurodegenerative disorders. In this paper, we discuss the function and expression of known neuronal-associated lncRNAs, their impact on epigenetic changes, the contribution of transposable elements to lncRNA expression, and the implication of lncRNAs in maintaining the 3D nuclear architecture in neurons. Moreover, we discuss how the complex molecular processes that are orchestrated by lncRNAs in the aged brain may contribute to neuronal pathogenesis by promoting protein aggregation and neurodegeneration. Finally, this review explores the possibility that age-related disturbances of lncRNA expression change the genomic and epigenetic regulatory landscape of neurons, which may affect neuronal processes such as neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-Coding RNA in the Nervous System)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview
Non-Coding RNA as Novel Players in the Pathophysiology of Schizophrenia
Non-Coding RNA 2018, 4(2), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/ncrna4020011 - 12 Apr 2018
Cited by 13
Abstract
Schizophrenia is associated with diverse changes in the brain’s transcriptome and proteome. Underlying these changes is the complex dysregulation of gene expression and protein production that varies both spatially across brain regions and temporally with the progression of the illness. The growing body [...] Read more.
Schizophrenia is associated with diverse changes in the brain’s transcriptome and proteome. Underlying these changes is the complex dysregulation of gene expression and protein production that varies both spatially across brain regions and temporally with the progression of the illness. The growing body of literature showing changes in non-coding RNA in individuals with schizophrenia offers new insights into the mechanisms causing this dysregulation. A large number of studies have reported that the expression of microRNA (miRNA) is altered in the brains of individuals with schizophrenia. This evidence is complemented by findings that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in miRNA host gene sequences can confer an increased risk of developing the disorder. Additionally, recent evidence suggests the expression of other non-coding RNAs, such as small nucleolar RNA and long non-coding RNA, may also be affected in schizophrenia. Understanding how these changes in non-coding RNAs contribute to the development and progression of schizophrenia offers potential avenues for the better treatment and diagnosis of the disorder. This review will focus on the evidence supporting the involvement of non-coding RNA in schizophrenia and its therapeutic potential. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-Coding RNA in the Nervous System)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

Open AccessPerspective
The State of Long Non-Coding RNA Biology
Non-Coding RNA 2018, 4(3), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/ncrna4030017 - 10 Aug 2018
Cited by 13
Abstract
Transcriptomic studies have demonstrated that the vast majority of the genomes of mammals and other complex organisms is expressed in highly dynamic and cell-specific patterns to produce large numbers of intergenic, antisense and intronic long non-protein-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Despite well characterized examples, their [...] Read more.
Transcriptomic studies have demonstrated that the vast majority of the genomes of mammals and other complex organisms is expressed in highly dynamic and cell-specific patterns to produce large numbers of intergenic, antisense and intronic long non-protein-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Despite well characterized examples, their scaling with developmental complexity, and many demonstrations of their association with cellular processes, development and diseases, lncRNAs are still to be widely accepted as major players in gene regulation. This may reflect an underappreciation of the extent and precision of the epigenetic control of differentiation and development, where lncRNAs appear to have a central role, likely as organizational and guide molecules: most lncRNAs are nuclear-localized and chromatin-associated, with some involved in the formation of specialized subcellular domains. I suggest that a reassessment of the conceptual framework of genetic information and gene expression in the 4-dimensional ontogeny of spatially organized multicellular organisms is required. Together with this and further studies on their biology, the key challenges now are to determine the structure–function relationships of lncRNAs, which may be aided by emerging evidence of their modular structure, the role of RNA editing and modification in enabling epigenetic plasticity, and the role of RNA signaling in transgenerational inheritance of experience. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-Coding RNA in the Nervous System)
Back to TopTop