Special Issue "Self-Powered Wireless Sensor Networks in the Era of Internet of Things"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 February 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Jun Chen
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
Interests: nanotechnology; soft materials; nanogenerator; wearable bioelectronics; smart textile; internet of things
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Hassan Askari
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada
Interests: self-powered sensing; energy harvesting; nanogenerators; wireless sensor networks; intelligent systems
Dr. Morteza Amjadi
Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Mechanical, Process and Energy Engineering, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS, United Kingdom
Interests: soft robotics; soft sensors; soft actuators; wearable medical devices; functional nanomaterials; composite materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Internet of Things have changed the way of our living from fundamental and meaningful ways. Wireless sensor networks (WSN) are the key component of this territory. In the era of Internet of things, the utilization of WSN is becoming widespread in a broad range of applications, including buildings, intelligent transportation systems, environmental monitoring, aerospace systems, health monitoring, soft robotics, and biomedical devices. One of the main challenges in the implementation of these sensors is their dependency on batteries that have a limited lifetime. Also, many of these sensors are used in remote, harsh, and inaccessible locations, and therefore, the maintenance of the power units would be very expensive in terms of cost and safety issues. Therefore, it is essential to develop novel power harvesting devices to provide sustainable energy to the sensors in the large-area network. Indeed, the utilization of novel nanotechnologies and nanomaterials for energy harvesting, and integrating them with WSN, will eliminate the demand for conventional batteries and wiring, which brings great convenience and largely reduces maintenance costs. Recently, nanogenerators with their competitive electrical output, reliability of performance, and ease of integration with commercial sensors have shown a significant potential for powering wireless sensors to realize the autonomous self-powered WSN. This Special Issue of Nanomaterials will cover the recent advances in self-powered sensing for wireless sensor networks using nanogenerators. The Special Issue is planned to cover, but will not be limited to, the following topics:

  • Nanogenerators for intelligent transportation systems and vehicular technology
  • Nanogenerators for biomedical devices
  • Self-powered sensors in smart houses
  • Impact of nanogenerators on future smart cities
  • Nanogenerators in environment monitoring
  • Life assessment of nanogenerators in wireless sensor networks

We invite researchers in the area of nanogenerators and active sensors to submit manuscripts to this Special Issue of Nanomaterials. We will consider full papers, communications, reviews, and perspectives for publication.

Dr. Jun Chen
Dr. Hassan Askari
Dr. Morteza Amjadi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessCommunication
Titanium-Doped P-Type WO3 Thin Films for Liquefied Petroleum Gas Detection
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(4), 727; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10040727 - 11 Apr 2020
Cited by 3
Abstract
Gas sensors are an important part of smart homes in the era of the Internet of Things. In this work, we studied Ti-doped P-type WO3 thin films for liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) sensors. Ti-doped tungsten oxide films were deposited on glass substrates [...] Read more.
Gas sensors are an important part of smart homes in the era of the Internet of Things. In this work, we studied Ti-doped P-type WO3 thin films for liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) sensors. Ti-doped tungsten oxide films were deposited on glass substrates by direct current reactive magnetron sputtering from a W-Ti alloy target at room temperature. After annealing at 450 °C in N2 ambient for 60 min, p-type Ti-doped WO3 was achieved for the first time. The measurement of the room temperature Hall-effect shows that the film has a resistivity of 5.223 × 103 Ωcm, a hole concentration of 9.227 × 1012 cm−3, and mobility of 1.295 × 102 cm2V−1s−1. X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses reveal that the substitution of W6+ with Ti4+ resulted in p-type conductance. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) images show that the films consist of densely packed nanoparticles. The transmittance of the p-type films is between 72% and 84% in the visible spectra and the optical bandgap is 3.28 eV. The resistance increased when the films were exposed to the reducing gas of liquefied petroleum gas, further confirming the p-type conduction of the films. The p-type films have a quick response and recovery behavior to LPG. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
The Application of Indium [email protected] Composite Material Derived from MOF in Cathode Material of Lithium Sulfur Batteries
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(1), 177; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10010177 - 20 Jan 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Due to the “shuttle effect”, the cycle performance of lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery is poor and the capacity decays rapidly. Replacing lithium-ion battery is the maximum problem to be overcome. In order to solve this problem, we use a cage like microporous MOF(CPM-5) [...] Read more.
Due to the “shuttle effect”, the cycle performance of lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery is poor and the capacity decays rapidly. Replacing lithium-ion battery is the maximum problem to be overcome. In order to solve this problem, we use a cage like microporous MOF(CPM-5) as a carbon source, which is carbonized at high temperature to get a micro-mesoporous carbon composite material. In addition, indium oxide particles formed during carbonization are deposited on CPM-5 structure, forming a simple core-shell structure CPM-5-C-600. When it is used as the cathode of Li-S battery, the small molecule sulfide can be confined in the micropores, while the existence of large pore size mesopores can provide a channel for the transmission of lithium ions, so as to improve the conductivity of the material and the rate performance of the battery. After 100 cycles, the specific capacity of the battery can be still maintained at 650 mA h·g−1 and the Coulombic efficiency is close to 100%. When the rate goes up to 2 C, the first discharge capacity not only can reach 1400 mA h·g−1, but also still provides 500 mA h·g−1 after 200 cycles, showing excellent rate performance. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Facile Synthesis of [email protected] Particles Toward High-Performance Anodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(10), 1467; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9101467 - 16 Oct 2019
Abstract
High energy density batteries with high performance are significantly important for intelligent electrical vehicular systems. Iron sulfurs are recognized as one of the most promising anodes for high energy density lithium-ion batteries because of their high theoretical specific capacity and relatively stable electrochemical [...] Read more.
High energy density batteries with high performance are significantly important for intelligent electrical vehicular systems. Iron sulfurs are recognized as one of the most promising anodes for high energy density lithium-ion batteries because of their high theoretical specific capacity and relatively stable electrochemical performance. However, their large-scale commercialized application for lithium-ion batteries are plagued by high-cost and complicated preparation methods. Here, we report a simple and cost-effective method for the scalable synthesis of nanoconfined FeS in porous carbon (defined as [email protected]) as anodes by direct pyrolysis of an iron(III) p-toluenesulfonate precursor. The carbon architecture embedded with FeS nanoparticles provides a rapid electron transport property, and its hierarchical porous structure effectively enhances the ion transport rate, thereby leading to a good electrochemical performance. The resultant [email protected] anodes exhibit high reversible capacity and long cycle life up to 500 cycles at high current density. This work provides a simple strategy for the mass production of [email protected] particles, which represents a critical step forward toward practical applications of iron sulfurs anodes. Full article
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