Special Issue "Wet Chemical Synthesis of Functional Nanomaterials"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 June 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Enrico Della Gaspera
Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
School of Science, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia
Interests: nanomaterials; thin films; nanostructures; optoelectronic devices; semiconductor doping; transparent electrodes; metal oxides; nanofabrication
Prof. Dr. Antonio Tricoli
Website
Guest Editor
Australian National University, Research School of Engineering, Canberra, Australia
Interests: nanotechnology; self-assembly; sensors; nanomedicine; functional coatings; renewable energy production and chemical storage; aerosols; flame synthesis
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Wet chemical synthesis, also called solution processing, represents an accessible, versatile and powerful approach for synthesizing materials with excellent control of their structural, chemical and physical properties. This becomes of paramount importance when synthesizing functional nanomaterials, which require precise control and tunability of their properties, including size, shape, composition, surface chemistry, and crystal orientation, in order to achieve the desired performances. Remarkable advancements in the wet chemical synthesis of nanomaterials have been achieved in recent decades, however solution-based technologies still require improvements in order to fully compete with other processes (mostly utilizing high vacuum, such as sputtering, thermal evaporation, atomic layer deposition, plasma, etc.), which despite being generally expensive, are considered more effective in producing high-quality nanomaterials, especially for use in optics and electronics.

Given the strong industrial and academic interest in solution-processed nanomaterials, we invite authors to contribute either research articles or reviews to this Special Issue dedicated to the wet chemical synthesis of functional nanomaterials. We will consider manuscripts describing both the synthesis of novel nanomaterials, and/or their functional application.

A non-exhaustive selection of potential topics of interest is as follows:

  1. Synthesis of nanomaterials through sol–gel chemistry
  2. Design and synthesis of molecular precursors for nanomaterials
  3. Colloidal synthesis of nanoparticles (metal, oxides, semiconductors, dielectrics)
  4. Wet chemical synthesis of 2D materials
  5. Deposition of nanostructured thin film coatings from liquid precursors
  6. Fabrication of solution-processed devices (solar cells, LEDs, batteries, supercapacitors, gas and light sensors, transistors, etc.)
  7. Scale-up synthesis of nanomaterials (large batch reactions, flow chemistry, etc.)

We look forward to receiving your submissions to this exciting Special Issue of Nanomaterials!

Dr. Enrico Della Gaspera
Prof. Antonio Tricoli
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • solution-processing
  • nanocrystals
  • colloids
  • nanostructures
  • sol–gel
  • nanoparticle inks
  • molecular precursors
  • printing
  • spray coating
  • thin films

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessFeature PaperCommunication
Fluorine-Doped Tin Oxide Colloidal Nanocrystals
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(5), 863; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10050863 - 30 Apr 2020
Abstract
Fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) is one of the most studied and established materials for transparent electrode applications. However, the syntheses for FTO nanocrystals are currently very limited, especially for stable and well-dispersed colloids. Here, we present the synthesis and detailed characterization of FTO [...] Read more.
Fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) is one of the most studied and established materials for transparent electrode applications. However, the syntheses for FTO nanocrystals are currently very limited, especially for stable and well-dispersed colloids. Here, we present the synthesis and detailed characterization of FTO nanocrystals using a colloidal heat-up reaction. High-quality SnO2 quantum dots are synthesized with a tuneable fluorine amount up to ~10% atomic, and their structural, morphological and optical properties are fully characterized. These colloids show composition-dependent optical properties, including the rise of a dopant-induced surface plasmon resonance in the near infrared. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wet Chemical Synthesis of Functional Nanomaterials)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Effect of Solution Conditions on the Properties of Sol–Gel Derived Potassium Sodium Niobate Thin Films on Platinized Sapphire Substrates
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(11), 1600; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9111600 - 11 Nov 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
If piezoelectric micro-devices based on K0.5Na0.5NbO3 (KNN) thin films are to achieve commercialization, it is critical to optimize the films’ performance using low-cost scalable processing conditions. Here, sol–gel derived KNN thin films are deposited using 0.2 and 0.4 [...] Read more.
If piezoelectric micro-devices based on K0.5Na0.5NbO3 (KNN) thin films are to achieve commercialization, it is critical to optimize the films’ performance using low-cost scalable processing conditions. Here, sol–gel derived KNN thin films are deposited using 0.2 and 0.4 M precursor solutions with 5% solely potassium excess and 20% alkali (both potassium and sodium) excess on platinized sapphire substrates with reduced thermal expansion mismatch in relation to KNN. Being then rapid thermal annealed at 750 °C for 5 min, the films revealed an identical thickness of ~340 nm but different properties. An average grain size of ~100 nm and nearly stoichiometric KNN films are obtained when using 5% potassium excess solution, while 20% alkali excess solutions give the grain size of 500–600 nm and (Na + K)/Nb ratio of 1.07–1.08 in the prepared films. Moreover, the 5% potassium excess solution films have a perovskite structure without clear preferential orientation, whereas a (100) texture appears for 20% alkali excess solutions, being particularly strong for the 0.4 M solution concentration. As a result of the grain size and (100) texturing competition, the highest room-temperature dielectric permittivity and lowest dissipation factor measured in the parallel-plate-capacitor geometry were obtained for KNN films using 0.2 M precursor solutions with 20% alkali excess. These films were also shown to possess more quadratic-like and less coercive local piezoelectric loops, compared to those from 5% potassium excess solution. Furthermore, KNN films with large (100)-textured grains prepared from 0.4 M precursor solution with 20% alkali excess were found to possess superior local piezoresponse attributed to multiscale domain microstructures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wet Chemical Synthesis of Functional Nanomaterials)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Recent Advances of Solution-Processed Heterojunction Oxide Thin-Film Transistors
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(5), 965; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10050965 - 18 May 2020
Abstract
Thin-film transistors (TFTs) made of metal oxide semiconductors are now increasingly used in flat-panel displays. Metal oxides are mainly fabricated via vacuum-based technologies, but solution approaches are of great interest due to the advantages of low-cost and high-throughput manufacturing. Unfortunately, solution-processed oxide TFTs [...] Read more.
Thin-film transistors (TFTs) made of metal oxide semiconductors are now increasingly used in flat-panel displays. Metal oxides are mainly fabricated via vacuum-based technologies, but solution approaches are of great interest due to the advantages of low-cost and high-throughput manufacturing. Unfortunately, solution-processed oxide TFTs suffer from relatively poor electrical performance, hindering further development. Recent studies suggest that this issue could be solved by introducing a novel heterojunction strategy. This article reviews the recent advances in solution-processed heterojunction oxide TFTs, with a specific focus on the latest developments over the past five years. Two of the most prominent advantages of heterostructure oxide TFTs are discussed, namely electrical-property modulation and mobility enhancement by forming 2D electron gas. It is expected that this review will manifest the strong potential of solution-based heterojunction oxide TFTs towards high performance and large-scale electronics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wet Chemical Synthesis of Functional Nanomaterials)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop