Special Issue "Porphyrin Based Nanomaterials for the Development of Nanotechnological Tool"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (29 February 2016).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Sheshanath Bhosale
Website
Guest Editor
RMIT University and Goa University
Interests: Dyes and Pigments; Porphyrins; Nanomaterials; supramolecular chemistry; sensors; artificial photosynthesis; solar cells
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanotechnology and new nanomaterials have an enormous impact on the modern science of technology The porphyrins are four pyrrole rings linked via methine bridges containing highly conjugated, planar and conjugated, rigid, and naturally occurring macrocyclic compounds, which play a very important role in the metabolism of living organisms. The porphyrin ring system is very stable and exhibits an aromatic character, in which the cavity space available for a coordinated metal has a maximum diameter of approximately 3.7 Å; this forms stable coordination complexes with metal ions, such as Zn, Cu, Fe, and Mg. Porphyrin derivatives play a key role in essential biological processes, such as photosynthesis, biological electron transport, oxygen transport, and metallo-enzymes.

On the other hand, the construction of nanosized supramolecular hosts via self-assembly of molecular components is a fascinating field of research. Such a fascinating class of architectures, in addition to their intrinsic intellectual stimuli, is of importance in many fields of chemistry and technology, such as material chemistry, catalysis, and sensor applications. The formation of supramolecules relays on non-covalent interactions (hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance, π–π stacking interactions, van der Waals forces, inter/intramolecular forces or charge transfer) driven by the chemical information stored in the assembling molecules. Due to these interactions, the porphyrin derivatives tend to self-assemble into variable, well-defined structures: that is, into ordered geometrical patterns, such as rods, rings, wires, nanofibres, nanospheres, vesicles, squares, and micellar fibres. This allows, for example, the formation of a solid system with tailored features through large well-defined porphyrin aggregates in solution that can be spontaneously transferred onto a solid surface.

This Special Issue aims to provide a forum for the dissemination of the latest information on recent developments in the porphyrin chemistry, with which to develop of nano- and bio-technological tools in various fields, such as sensing, photochemistry, catalysis, biology, and solar cell applications.

Dr. Sheshanath V. Bhosale
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • porphyrin
  • self-assembly
  • sensing
  • catalysis
  • photosynthesis
  • transport and storage

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
Photosensitizer-Embedded Polyacrylonitrile Nanofibers as Antimicrobial Non-Woven Textile
Nanomaterials 2016, 6(4), 77; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano6040077 - 20 Apr 2016
Cited by 22
Abstract
Toward the objective of developing platform technologies for anti-infective materials based upon photodynamic inactivation, we employed electrospinning to prepare a non-woven textile comprised of polyacrylonitrile nanofibers embedded with a porphyrin-based cationic photosensitizer; termed PAN-Por(+). Photosensitizer loading was determined to be 34.8 [...] Read more.
Toward the objective of developing platform technologies for anti-infective materials based upon photodynamic inactivation, we employed electrospinning to prepare a non-woven textile comprised of polyacrylonitrile nanofibers embedded with a porphyrin-based cationic photosensitizer; termed PAN-Por(+). Photosensitizer loading was determined to be 34.8 nmol/mg material; with thermostability to 300 °C. Antibacterial efficacy was evaluated against four bacteria belonging to the ESKAPE family of pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus; vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium; Acinetobacter baumannii; and Klebsiella pneumonia), as well as Escherichia coli. Our results demonstrated broad photodynamic inactivation of all bacterial strains studied upon illumination (30 min; 65 ± 5 mW/cm2; 400–700 nm) by a minimum of 99.9996+% (5.8 log units) regardless of taxonomic classification. PAN-Por(+) also inactivated human adenovirus-5 (~99.8% reduction in PFU/mL) and vesicular stomatitis virus (>7 log units reduction in PFU/mL). When compared to cellulose-based materials employing this same photosensitizer; the higher levels of photodynamic inactivation achieved here with PAN-Por(+) are likely due to the combined effects of higher photosensitizer loading and a greater surface area imparted by the use of nanofibers. These results demonstrate the potential of photosensitizer-embedded polyacrylonitrile nanofibers to serve as scalable scaffolds for anti-infective or self-sterilizing materials against both bacteria and viruses when employing a photodynamic inactivation mode of action. Full article
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Open AccessReview
Porphyrin-Based Nanostructures for Photocatalytic Applications
Nanomaterials 2016, 6(3), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano6030051 - 22 Mar 2016
Cited by 68
Abstract
Well-defined organic nanostructures with controllable size and morphology are increasingly exploited in optoelectronic devices. As promising building blocks, porphyrins have demonstrated great potentials in visible-light photocatalytic applications, because of their electrical, optical and catalytic properties. From this perspective, we have summarized the recent [...] Read more.
Well-defined organic nanostructures with controllable size and morphology are increasingly exploited in optoelectronic devices. As promising building blocks, porphyrins have demonstrated great potentials in visible-light photocatalytic applications, because of their electrical, optical and catalytic properties. From this perspective, we have summarized the recent significant advances on the design and photocatalytic applications of porphyrin-based nanostructures. The rational strategies, such as texture or crystal modification and interfacial heterostructuring, are described. The applications of the porphyrin-based nanostructures in photocatalytic pollutant degradation and hydrogen evolution are presented. Finally, the ongoing challenges and opportunities for the future development of porphyrin nanostructures in high-quality nanodevices are also proposed. Full article
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