Nonlinear and Quantum Optics with Nanostructures

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanophotonics Materials and Devices".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 October 2021) | Viewed by 15572

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Spectroscopy of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Fizicheskaya Str. 5, Troitsk, 142190 Moscow, Russia
Interests: laser physics; interaction of laser radiation with matter; laser applications in life sciences; quantum optics and foundations of quantum information; nanophotonics

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Guest Editor
Nonlinear Physics Center, Research School of Physics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia
Interests: nonlinear optics; metamaterials; nanophotonics; topological photonics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nonlinear optical interactions in nanostructures strongly depend on the near-field intensity and polarization pattern around the nanostructure and their clusters. Respectively, nonlinear optical response brings lots of information about the nanostructures and interplay of electric and magnetic contributions (such as electric and magnetic dipoles, quadrupoles, and other modes) within the nanostructure to the exciting electromagnetic field. Then the whole arsenal of nonlinear optical methods can be employed to study these interactions and their dynamics with sub-nanometer space- and femtosecond time-resolution being empowered by Mie and plasmonic resonances as well as bound states in the continuum.

Interaction of the light with nanostructure(s) and, especially, with quantum emitters in the near-field of these structures when quantum features of light and of quantum emitter(s), as well as of the nanostructure(s) come into the play, requires an arsenal of quantum optics methods to study such systems.

This special issue aims to cover recent progress in both nonlinear and quantum optics studies of nanostructures (including their interactions with a few-level quantum emitters). The format of welcomed articles includes full papers, communications, and reviews. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Nonlinear optics with nanostructures (wave mixing; nonlinear scattering from individual nanostructures; enhanced nonlinear effects (SHG, FWM, CARS); nonlinear optical properties of nanostructures at a single-photon level; controlling light with light in nanostructures; nonlinear plasmonic crystals, switching and bistability; nonlinear plasmonic metamaterials, etc.)
  • Quantum optics in the limit of few quantum emitters and few-plasmons (quantum optics of a quantum emitter (few quantum emitters) in the vicinity of a nanostructure; resonance fluorescence; squeezing of light from resonance fluorescence; effects of bunching/antibunching; statistics of light from resonance fluorescence; quantum entanglement in a few-levels quantum emitters near a nanostructure, etc.)

Prof. Dr. Victor Zadkov
Prof. Dr. Yuri Kivshar
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Nanostructure(s)
  • Nonlinear nanophotonics
  • Second harmonic generation (SHG)
  • Four-wave mixing (FWM)
  • Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS)
  • Controlling light with light
  • Nonlinear plasmonic
  • Nonlinear metasurfaces
  • Switching and bistability
  • Quantum optics with nanostructures
  • Quantum metasurfaces
  • Resonance fluorescence
  • Bunching/antibunching
  • Squeezed light
  • Quantum entanglement

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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11 pages, 2893 KiB  
Article
Influence of Spatial Dispersion on the Electromagnetic Properties of Magnetoplasmonic Nanostructures
by Yuri Eremin and Vladimir Lopushenko
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(12), 3297; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11123297 - 04 Dec 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1548
Abstract
Magnetoplasmonics based on composite nanostructures is widely used in many biomedical applications. Nanostructures, consisting of a magnetic core and a gold shell, exhibit plasmonic properties, that allow the concentration of electromagnetic energy in ultra-small volumes when used, for example, in imaging and therapy. [...] Read more.
Magnetoplasmonics based on composite nanostructures is widely used in many biomedical applications. Nanostructures, consisting of a magnetic core and a gold shell, exhibit plasmonic properties, that allow the concentration of electromagnetic energy in ultra-small volumes when used, for example, in imaging and therapy. Magnetoplasmonic nanostructures have become an indispensable tool in nanomedicine. The gold shell protects the core from oxidation and corrosion, providing a biocompatible platform for tumor imaging and cancer treatment. By adjusting the size of the core and the shell thickness, the maximum energy concentration can be shifted from the ultraviolet to the near infrared, where the depth of light penetration is maximum due to low scattering and absorption by tissues. A decrease in the thickness of the gold shell to several nanometers leads to the appearance of the quantum effect of spatial dispersion in the metal. The presence of the quantum effect can cause both a significant decrease in the level of energy concentration by plasmon particles and a shift of the maxima to the short-wavelength region, thereby reducing the expected therapeutic effect. In this study, to describe the influence of the quantum effect of spatial dispersion, we used the discrete sources method, which incorporates the generalized non-local optical response theory. This approach made it possible to account for the influence of the nonlocal effect on the optical properties of composite nanoparticles, including the impact of the asymmetry of the core-shell structure on the energy characteristics. It was found that taking spatial dispersion into account leads to a decrease in the maximum value of the concentration of electromagnetic energy up to 25%, while the blue shift can reach 15 nm. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nonlinear and Quantum Optics with Nanostructures)
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11 pages, 4049 KiB  
Article
Electromagnetically Induced Transparency-Like Effect by Dark-Dark Mode Coupling
by Qiao Wang, Kaili Kuang, Huixuan Gao, Shuwen Chu, Li Yu and Wei Peng
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(5), 1350; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11051350 - 20 May 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2243
Abstract
Electromagnetically induced transparency-like (EIT-like) effect is a promising research area for applications of slow light, sensing and metamaterials. The EIT-like effect is generally formed by the destructive interference of bright-dark mode coupling and bright-bright mode coupling. There are seldom reports about EIT-like effect [...] Read more.
Electromagnetically induced transparency-like (EIT-like) effect is a promising research area for applications of slow light, sensing and metamaterials. The EIT-like effect is generally formed by the destructive interference of bright-dark mode coupling and bright-bright mode coupling. There are seldom reports about EIT-like effect realized by the coupling of two dark modes. In this paper, we numerically and theoretically demonstrated that the EIT-like effect is achieved through dark-dark mode coupling of two waveguide resonances in a compound nanosystem with metal grating and multilayer structure. If we introduce |1, |2 and |3 to represent the surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) resonance, waveguide resonance in layer 2, and waveguide resonance in layer 4, the destructive interference occurs between two pathways of |0|1|2 and |0|1|2|3|2, where |0 is the ground state without excitation. Our work will stimulate more studies on EIT-like effect with dark-dark mode coupling in other systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nonlinear and Quantum Optics with Nanostructures)
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13 pages, 3357 KiB  
Article
Hyperfine Interactions in the NV-13C Quantum Registers in Diamond Grown from the Azaadamantane Seed
by Alexander P. Nizovtsev, Aliaksandr L. Pushkarchuk, Sergei Ya. Kilin, Nikolai I. Kargin, Alexander S. Gusev, Marina O. Smirnova and Fedor Jelezko
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(5), 1303; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11051303 - 14 May 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2589
Abstract
Nanostructured diamonds hosting optically active paramagnetic color centers (NV, SiV, GeV, etc.) and hyperfine-coupled with them quantum memory 13C nuclear spins situated in diamond lattice are currently of great interest to implement emerging quantum technologies (quantum information processing, quantum sensing and metrology). [...] Read more.
Nanostructured diamonds hosting optically active paramagnetic color centers (NV, SiV, GeV, etc.) and hyperfine-coupled with them quantum memory 13C nuclear spins situated in diamond lattice are currently of great interest to implement emerging quantum technologies (quantum information processing, quantum sensing and metrology). Current methods of creation such as electronic-nuclear spin systems are inherently probabilistic with respect to mutual location of color center electronic spin and 13C nuclear spins. A new bottom-up approach to fabricate such systems is to synthesize first chemically appropriate diamond-like organic molecules containing desired isotopic constituents in definite positions and then use them as a seed for diamond growth to produce macroscopic diamonds, subsequently creating vacancy-related color centers in them. In particular, diamonds incorporating coupled NV-13C spin systems (quantum registers) with specific mutual arrangements of NV and 13C can be obtained from anisotopic azaadamantane molecule. Here we predict the characteristics of hyperfine interactions (hfi) for the NV-13C systems in diamonds grown from various isotopically substituted azaadamantane molecules differing in 13C position in the seed, as well as the orientation of the NV center in the post-obtained diamond. We used the spatial and hfi data simulated earlier for the H-terminated cluster C510[NV]-H252. The data obtained can be used to identify (and correlate with the seed used) the specific NV-13C spin system by measuring, e.g., the hfi-induced splitting of the mS = ±1 sublevels of the NV center in optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) spectra being characteristic for various NV-13C systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nonlinear and Quantum Optics with Nanostructures)
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15 pages, 1554 KiB  
Article
Integrated Source of Path-Entangled Photon Pairs with Efficient Pump Self-Rejection
by Pablo de la Hoz, Anton Sakovich, Alexander Mikhalychev, Matthew Thornton, Natalia Korolkova and Dmitri Mogilevtsev
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(10), 1952; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10101952 - 30 Sep 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2541
Abstract
We present a theoretical proposal for an integrated four-wave mixing source of narrow-band path-entangled photon pairs with efficient spatial pump self-rejection. The scheme is based on correlated loss in a system of waveguides in Kerr nonlinear media. We calculate that this setup gives [...] Read more.
We present a theoretical proposal for an integrated four-wave mixing source of narrow-band path-entangled photon pairs with efficient spatial pump self-rejection. The scheme is based on correlated loss in a system of waveguides in Kerr nonlinear media. We calculate that this setup gives the possibility for upwards of 100 dB pump rejection, without additional filtering. The effect is reached by driving the symmetric collective mode that is strongly attenuated by an engineered dissipation, while photon pairs are born in the antisymmetric mode. A similar set-up can additionally be realized for the generation of two-photon NOON states, also with pump self-rejection. We discuss the implementation of the scheme by means of the coherent diffusive photonics, and demostrate its feasibility in both glass (such as fused silica-glass and IG2) and planar semiconductor waveguide structures in indium phosphide (InP) and in silicon. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nonlinear and Quantum Optics with Nanostructures)
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13 pages, 494 KiB  
Article
Optical Multistability in the Metal Nanoparticle–Graphene Nanodisk–Quantum Dot Hybrid Systems
by Mariam M. Tohari, Moteb M. Alqahtani and Andreas Lyras
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(9), 1687; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10091687 - 27 Aug 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1903
Abstract
Hybrid nanoplasmonic systems can provide a promising platform of potential nonlinear applications due to the enhancement of optical fields near their surfaces in addition to the control of strong light–matter interactions they can afford. We theoretically investigated the optical multistability of a probe [...] Read more.
Hybrid nanoplasmonic systems can provide a promising platform of potential nonlinear applications due to the enhancement of optical fields near their surfaces in addition to the control of strong light–matter interactions they can afford. We theoretically investigated the optical multistability of a probe field that circulated along a unidirectional ring cavity containing a metal nanoparticle–graphene nanodisk–quantum dot hybrid system; the quantum dot was modeled as a three-level atomic system of Lambda configuration interacting with probe and control fields in the optical region of the electromagnetic spectrum. We show that the threshold and degree of multistability can be controlled by the geometry of the setup, the size of metal nanoparticles, the carrier mobility in the graphene nanodisk and the detunings of probe and control fields. We found that under electromagnetically-induced transparency conditions the system exhibits enhanced optical multistability with an ultralow threshold in the case of two-photon resonance with high carrier mobility in the graphene nanodisk. Moreover, we calculated the limits of the controllable parameters within which the switching between optical multistability and bistability can occur. We show that our proposed hybrid plasmonic system can be useful for efficient all-optical switches and logic-gate elements for quantum computing and quantum information processing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nonlinear and Quantum Optics with Nanostructures)
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Review

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33 pages, 13826 KiB  
Review
Quantum Optics in Nanostructures
by Yulia V. Vladimirova and Victor N. Zadkov
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(8), 1919; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11081919 - 26 Jul 2021
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 3463
Abstract
This review is devoted to the study of effects of quantum optics in nanostructures. The mechanisms by which the rates of radiative and nonradiative decay are modified are considered in the model of a two-level quantum emitter (QE) near a plasmonic nanoparticle (NP). [...] Read more.
This review is devoted to the study of effects of quantum optics in nanostructures. The mechanisms by which the rates of radiative and nonradiative decay are modified are considered in the model of a two-level quantum emitter (QE) near a plasmonic nanoparticle (NP). The distributions of the intensity and polarization of the near field around an NP are analyzed, which substantially depend on the polarization of the external field and parameters of plasmon resonances of the NP. The effects of quantum optics in the system NP + QE plus external laser field are analyzed—modification of the resonance fluorescence spectrum of a QE in the near field, bunching/antibunching phenomena, quantum statistics of photons in the spectrum, formation of squeezed states of light, and quantum entangled states in these systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nonlinear and Quantum Optics with Nanostructures)
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