Special Issue "Self-Assembled Nanostructures for Molecular Recognition"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Biology and Medicines".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Makoto Takafuji
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Kumamoto University, Department of Applied Chemistry and Biochemistry, Kumamoto, Japan
Interests: hybrid hydrogels; supramolecular assemblies; magnetic nanoparticles; optical active polymer composite films
Prof. Dr. Hirotaka Ihara
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Applied Chemistry and Biochemistry, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555, Japan
Interests: bio-inspired self-assembling chemistry with small molecules and core-shell hybrid materials as intelligent fillers and their applications for solar energy conversion; optical management; separation chemistry and so on

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Molecular self-assembly is generally recognized as a result of the spontaneous organization of molecules into highly ordered structures. A typical example is seen in biological systems that function as cell division, motility, signal transduction, and so on. Therefore, much effort has been devoted to creating unique artificial self-assembly by mimicking biological systems. This Special Issue aims to cover a wide range of themes related to molecular recognition using self-assembled nanostructures. We invite scientists to contribute original research articles or comprehensive review articles covering the latest advances and new developments in self-assembled nanostructures for molecular recognition. Potential topics include but are not limited to:

- Self-assembled nanostructures for molecular separation;

- Self-assembled nanostructures for molecular sensors;

- Self-assembled nanostructures for biomarkers and biosensors;

- Self-assembled nanostructures for chirality.

Prof. Dr. Makoto Takafuji
Prof. Dr. Hirotaka Ihara
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • self-assembly
  • self-assembled nanostructures
  • molecular recognition
  • molecular separation
  • molecular sensors
  • biomarkers
  • biosensors
  • chirality
  • mimicking biological systems

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
A Molecular Shape Recognitive HPLC Stationary Phase Based on a Highly Ordered Amphiphilic Glutamide Molecular Gel
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(6), 1574; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11061574 - 15 Jun 2021
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Abstract
Chiral glutamide-derived lipids form self-assembled fibrous molecular gels that can be used as HPLC organic phases. In this study, HPLC separation efficiency was improved through the addition of branched amphiphilic glutamide lipids to the side chains of a terminally immobilized flexible polymer backbone. [...] Read more.
Chiral glutamide-derived lipids form self-assembled fibrous molecular gels that can be used as HPLC organic phases. In this study, HPLC separation efficiency was improved through the addition of branched amphiphilic glutamide lipids to the side chains of a terminally immobilized flexible polymer backbone. Poly(4-vinylpyridine) with a trimethoxysilyl group at one end was grafted onto the surface of porous silica particles (Sil−VP15, polymerization degree = 15), and the pyridyl side chains were quaternized with a glutamide lipid having a bromide group (BrG). Elemental analysis indicated that the total amount of the organic phase of the prepared stationary phase (Sil−VPG15) was 38.0 wt%, and the quaternization degree of the pyridyl groups was determined to be 32.5%. Differential scanning calorimetric analysis of a methanol suspension of Sil−VPG15 indicated that the G moieties formed a highly ordered structure below the phase transition temperature even on the silica surface, and the ordered G moieties exhibited a gel-to-liquid crystalline phase transition. Compared with a commercially available octadecylated silica column, the Sil−VPG15 stationary phase showed high selectivity toward polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and particularly excellent separations were obtained for geometrical and positional isomers. Sil−VPG15 also showed highly selective separation for phenol derivatives, and bio-related molecules containing phenolic groups such as steroids were successfully separated. These separation abilities are probably due to multiple interactions between the elutes and the highly ordered functional groups, such as the pyridinium and amide groups, on the highly ordered molecular gel having self-assembling G moieties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Self-Assembled Nanostructures for Molecular Recognition)
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Article
Enantioselective Self-Assembled Nanofibrillar Network with Glutamide-Based Organogelator
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(6), 1376; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11061376 - 23 May 2021
Viewed by 683
Abstract
A chiral molecular gelation system, as a chiral host, was used to effectively realize enantioselectivity using the simple carboxylic acid functional group. For this purpose, an L-glutamic-acid-based lipidic amphiphile (G-CA) with a carboxylic head group was selected and its responsiveness to [...] Read more.
A chiral molecular gelation system, as a chiral host, was used to effectively realize enantioselectivity using the simple carboxylic acid functional group. For this purpose, an L-glutamic-acid-based lipidic amphiphile (G-CA) with a carboxylic head group was selected and its responsiveness to cationic guest molecules was investigated. The dispersion morphology of G-CA in its solution state was examined by confocal and transmission electron microscopies, while interactions between the G-CA, as the host system, and guest molecules were evaluated by UV-visible, circular dichroism, and fluorescence spectroscopies. As a result, enantioselectivity was effectively induced when G-CA formed highly ordered aggregates that provide negatively charged surfaces in which carboxyl groups are assembled in highly ordered states, and when the two cationic groups of the guest molecule are attached to this surface through multiple interactions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Self-Assembled Nanostructures for Molecular Recognition)
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Review

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Review
Metal Oxide-Related Dendritic Structures: Self-Assembly and Applications for Sensor, Catalysis, Energy Conversion and Beyond
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(7), 1686; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11071686 - 27 Jun 2021
Viewed by 478
Abstract
In the past two decades, we have learned a great deal about self-assembly of dendritic metal oxide structures, partially inspired by the nanostructures mimicking the aesthetic hierarchical structures of ferns and corals. The self-assembly process involves either anisotropic polycondensation or molecular recognition mechanisms. [...] Read more.
In the past two decades, we have learned a great deal about self-assembly of dendritic metal oxide structures, partially inspired by the nanostructures mimicking the aesthetic hierarchical structures of ferns and corals. The self-assembly process involves either anisotropic polycondensation or molecular recognition mechanisms. The major driving force for research in this field is due to the wide variety of applications in addition to the unique structures and properties of these dendritic nanostructures. Our purpose of this minireview is twofold: (1) to showcase what we have learned so far about how the self-assembly process occurs; and (2) to encourage people to use this type of material for drug delivery, renewable energy conversion and storage, biomaterials, and electronic noses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Self-Assembled Nanostructures for Molecular Recognition)
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