Special Issue "Functional Nanoparticles for Experimental Therapy and Clinical Trial"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 May 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Anton Valeri Liopo
Website
Guest Editor
Texas A&M Health Science Center - Institute of Biosciences and Technology, Texas A&M University;
Department of Chemistry, Rice University, Houston TX, USA.
Interests: Nanobiotechnology, Nanotoxicology, Nanomedicine, Nanoparticles functionalization for Nanotheranostics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanoparticles provide significant advantages over conventional agents: Extension of circulation half-life, accumulation at regions of interest, such as tumor, due to the enhanced permeability, and the retention effect. Nanoparticles (NP) unique properties for biomedical applications and can be enhanced via functionalization. Different types of nanomaterials have been developed to provide contrast in medical imaging, thermal therapy, drug delivery, and theranostics. Surface modification of NPs is the approach of using the benefits of nanotechnology for personalized medicine. Functional nanomaterials on the nanoscale provide many unique properties, such as enhanced permeability, controlled interlization into cells and nuclei, and reducing toxicity for healthy tissues. The current Special Issue is a compilation of advancements in the area of functional nanoparticles, the results of multidisciplinary research, including nanocomposites as radiosensitizers, contrast agents for X-ray imaging and drug delivery, novel chemical constructions for targeted chemotherapy, and preclinical and clinical trials. This field arose from innovations in the chemistry of nanomaterials, physics, and bioengineering.

Our Special Issue invites full size articles, short communications, case reports, and reviews.

Dr. Anton Valeri Liopo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Manufacturing
  • Functionalization and Characterization Functionalized NP
  • Photo and radiosensitization
  • Image-guided radiotherapy
  • Nanocarriers of Functionalized NP
  • Nanotherapeutic

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Effect of Tissue-Mimicking Phantom Compressibility on Magnetic Hyperthermia
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(5), 803; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9050803 - 25 May 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
During hyperthermia, magnetite nanoparticles placed in an AC magnetic field become a source of heat. It has been shown that in fluid suspensions, magnetic particles move freely and generate heat easily. However, in tissues of different mechanical properties, nanoparticle movement is limited and [...] Read more.
During hyperthermia, magnetite nanoparticles placed in an AC magnetic field become a source of heat. It has been shown that in fluid suspensions, magnetic particles move freely and generate heat easily. However, in tissues of different mechanical properties, nanoparticle movement is limited and leads to a small temperature rise in tissue. Therefore, it is crucial to conduct magnetic hyperthermia experiments in similar conditions to the human body. The effect of tissue-mimicking phantom compressibility on the effectiveness of magnetic hyperthermia was investigated on agar phantoms. Single and cluster nanoparticles were synthesized and used as magnetic materials. The prepared magnetic materials were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and zeta potential measurements. Results show that tissue-mimicking phantom compressibility decreases with the concentration of agar. Moreover, the lower the compressibility, the lower the thermal effect of magnetic hyperthermia. Specific absorption rate (SAR) values also proved our assumption that tissue-mimicking phantom compressibility affects magnetic losses in the alternating magnetic field (AMF). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Functional Nanoparticles for Experimental Therapy and Clinical Trial)
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