Biological Interactions of Nanomaterials

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Biology and Medicines".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2023) | Viewed by 10746

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Laboratory of Research in Nanosciences, LRN-EA4682, University of Reims Champagne-Ardenne (URCA), Reims, France
Interests: nanomedicine; nanoparticles; protein–nanoparticle interactions; nanotoxicology; ultrasensitive detection; nanobiosensors; immunochemistry; theranostics

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Guest Editor
Laboratory of Research in Nanosciences, LRN-EA4682, University of Reims Champagne-Ardenne (URCA), Reims, France
Interests: nanobiotechnologies; nanomedicine; quantum dots; plasmonic nanoparticles; light-matter strong coupling; diagnostics; cancer

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Rapid development of nanotechnology offers new opportunities for engineering nanomaterials with unique physico-chemical properties. The main obstacle to their use is their potential toxicity for living organisms. Detailed knowledge of the effects of nanomaterials on biological systems related to their high permeation capacity and reactivity, specific interaction with biological molecules and capability for modulating biological and environmental homeostases is a necessary basis for safe implementation of nanotechnological tools. Full understanding of the interactions between all factors and mechanisms underlying the harmful effects is a prerequisite for designing safe, biocompatible nanomaterials. Thus, the development of approaches to the engineering of safe nanomaterials, as well as nanohybrid materials based on them, requires the analysis of the entire complicated system of nano–bio interactions.

It is worth mentioning that the mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity cannot be identified without a generalized systemic approach to the study of structural and functional interactions between artificial nano-objects and biological systems. Therefore, this Special Issue focuses on the interactions between nanomaterials and living organisms, seeking a wider perspective on this complex problem, including the nanomaterials' capability of crossing biological barriers and accumulating in specific biological compartments, the details of the formation of the biomolecular corona, the effects of nanomaterials on the immune system and redox homeostasis, genotoxicity of nanomaterials, assessment of nanotoxicity, as well as controlled functionalization of nanomaterials to obtain biocompatible hybrid materials and their targeted safe delivery to tissues and cells.

Dr. Alyona Sukhanova
Prof. Dr. Igor Nabiev
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Nano–bio interface
  • Functionalization of nanomaterials
  • Bioadaptation of nanomaterials
  • Biotemplated nanomaterials
  • Nano–bio hybrid materials
  • Biological barriers and nanomaterials
  • Nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery
  • Nanoparticle biomolecular corona
  • Immunomodulatory properties of nanomaterials
  • Redox reactions of nanomaterials
  • Nanogenotoxicity
  • Assessment of nanotoxicity

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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11 pages, 5814 KiB  
Article
Multifunctional Core/Shell Diamond Nanoparticles Combining Unique Thermal and Light Properties for Future Biological Applications
by Sergey A. Grudinkin, Kirill V. Bogdanov, Vladimir A. Tolmachev, Mikhail A. Baranov, Ilya E. Kaliya, Valery G. Golubev and Alexander V. Baranov
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(24), 3124; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13243124 - 12 Dec 2023
Viewed by 803
Abstract
We report the development of multifunctional core/shell chemical vapor deposition diamond nanoparticles for the local photoinduced hyperthermia, thermometry, and fluorescent imaging. The diamond core heavily doped with boron is heated due to absorbed laser radiation and in turn heats the shell of a [...] Read more.
We report the development of multifunctional core/shell chemical vapor deposition diamond nanoparticles for the local photoinduced hyperthermia, thermometry, and fluorescent imaging. The diamond core heavily doped with boron is heated due to absorbed laser radiation and in turn heats the shell of a thin transparent diamond layer with embedded negatively charged SiV color centers emitting intense and narrowband zero-phonon lines with a temperature-dependent wavelength near 738 nm. The heating of the core/shell diamond nanoparticle is indicated by the temperature-induced spectral shift in the intensive zero-phonon line of the SiV color centers embedded in the diamond shell. The temperature of the core/shell diamond particles can be precisely manipulated by the power of the incident light. At laser power safe for biological systems, the photoinduced temperature of the core/shell diamond nanoparticles is high enough to be used for hyperthermia therapy and local nanothermometry, while the high zero-phonon line intensity of the SiV color centers allows for the fluorescent imaging of treated areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological Interactions of Nanomaterials)
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16 pages, 3751 KiB  
Article
Dependence of Quantum Dot Toxicity In Vitro on Their Size, Chemical Composition, and Surface Charge
by Alyona Sukhanova, Svetlana Bozrova, Evgeniia Gerasimovich, Maria Baryshnikova, Zinaida Sokolova, Pavel Samokhvalov, Chris Guhrenz, Nikolai Gaponik, Alexander Karaulov and Igor Nabiev
Nanomaterials 2022, 12(16), 2734; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano12162734 - 09 Aug 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 1789
Abstract
Semiconductor nanocrystals known as quantum dots (QDs) are of great interest for researchers and have potential use in various applications in biomedicine, such as in vitro diagnostics, molecular tracking, in vivo imaging, and drug delivery. Systematic analysis of potential hazardous effects of QDs [...] Read more.
Semiconductor nanocrystals known as quantum dots (QDs) are of great interest for researchers and have potential use in various applications in biomedicine, such as in vitro diagnostics, molecular tracking, in vivo imaging, and drug delivery. Systematic analysis of potential hazardous effects of QDs is necessary to ensure their safe use. In this study, we obtained water-soluble core/shell QDs differing in size, surface charge, and chemical composition of the core. All the synthesized QDs were modified with polyethylene glycol derivatives to obtain outer organic shells protecting them from degradation. The physical and chemical parameters were fully characterized. In vitro cytotoxicity of the QDs was estimated in both normal and tumor cell lines. We demonstrated that QDs with the smallest size had the highest in vitro cytotoxicity. The most toxic QDs were characterized by a low negative surface charge, while positively charged QDs were less cytotoxic, and QDs with a greater negative charge were the least toxic. In contrast, the chemical composition of the QD core did not noticeably affect the cytotoxicity in vitro. This study provides a better understanding of the influence of the QD parameters on their cytotoxicity and can be used to improve the design of QDs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological Interactions of Nanomaterials)
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15 pages, 3299 KiB  
Article
The TLR4/NFκB-Dependent Inflammatory Response Activated by LPS Is Inhibited in Human Macrophages Pre-Exposed to Amorphous Silica Nanoparticles
by Massimiliano G. Bianchi, Martina Chiu, Giuseppe Taurino, Enrico Bergamaschi, Francesco Cubadda, Guido M. Macaluso and Ovidio Bussolati
Nanomaterials 2022, 12(13), 2307; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano12132307 - 05 Jul 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1937
Abstract
Amorphous silica nanoparticles (ASNP) are present in a variety of products and their biological effects are actively investigated. Although several studies have documented pro-inflammatory effects of ASNP, the possibility that they also modify the response of innate immunity cells to natural activators has [...] Read more.
Amorphous silica nanoparticles (ASNP) are present in a variety of products and their biological effects are actively investigated. Although several studies have documented pro-inflammatory effects of ASNP, the possibility that they also modify the response of innate immunity cells to natural activators has not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we study the effects of pyrogenic ASNP on the LPS-dependent activation of human macrophages differentiated from peripheral blood monocytes. In macrophages, 24 h of pre-exposure to non-cytotoxic doses of ASNP markedly inhibited the LPS-dependent induction of pro-inflammatory (TNFα, IL-6) and anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10). The inhibitory effect was associated with the suppression of NFκB activation and the increased intracellular sequestration of the TLR4 receptor. The late induction of glutamine synthetase (GS) by LPS was also prevented by pre-exposure to ASNP, while GS silencing did not interfere with cytokine secretion. It is concluded that (i) macrophages exposed to ASNP are less sensitive to LPS-dependent activation and (ii) GS induction by LPS is likely secondary to the stimulation of cytokine secretion. The observed interference with LPS effects may point to a dampening of the acute inflammatory response after exposure to ASNP in humans. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological Interactions of Nanomaterials)
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17 pages, 3709 KiB  
Article
Food-Grade Titanium Dioxide Induces Toxicity in the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and Acute Hepatic and Pulmonary Responses in Mice
by Giovanni Sitia, Fabio Fiordaliso, Martina B. Violatto, Jennifer Fernandez Alarcon, Laura Talamini, Alessandro Corbelli, Lorena Maria Ferreira, Ngoc Lan Tran, Indranath Chakraborty, Mario Salmona, Wolfgang J. Parak, Luisa Diomede and Paolo Bigini
Nanomaterials 2022, 12(10), 1669; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano12101669 - 13 May 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1919
Abstract
Food-grade titanium dioxide (E171) contains variable percentages of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs), posing concerns for its potential effects on human and animal health. Despite many studies, the actual relationship between the physicochemical properties of E171 NPs and their interaction with [...] Read more.
Food-grade titanium dioxide (E171) contains variable percentages of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs), posing concerns for its potential effects on human and animal health. Despite many studies, the actual relationship between the physicochemical properties of E171 NPs and their interaction with biological targets is still far from clear. We evaluated the impact of acute E171 administration on invertebrate and vertebrate animals. In the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, the administration of up to 1.0 mg/mL of E171 did not affect the worm’s viability and lifespan, but significantly impaired its pharyngeal function, reproduction, and development. We also investigated whether the intravenous administration of E171 in mice (at the dose of 6 mg/kg/body weight) could result in an acute over-absorption of filter organs. A significant increase of hepatic titanium concentration and the formation of microgranulomas were observed. Interstitial inflammation and parenchymal modification were found in the lungs, coupled with titanium accumulation. This was probably due to the propensity of TiO2 NPs to agglomerate, as demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy experiments showing that the incubation of E171 with serum promoted the formation of compact clusters. Overall, these data emphasize the actual risk for human and animal exposure to E171. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological Interactions of Nanomaterials)
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Review

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31 pages, 2840 KiB  
Review
The Role of Stabilizing Copolymer in Determining the Physicochemical Properties of Conjugated Polymer Nanoparticles and Their Nanomedical Applications
by Miao Zhao, Anton Uzunoff, Mark Green and Aliaksandra Rakovich
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(9), 1543; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13091543 - 04 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1638
Abstract
Conjugated polymer nanoparticles (CPNs) are a promising class of nanomaterials for biomedical applications, such as bioimaging, gene and drug delivery/release, photodynamic therapy (PDT), photothermal therapy (PTT), and environmental sensing. Over the past decade, many reports have been published detailing their synthesis and their [...] Read more.
Conjugated polymer nanoparticles (CPNs) are a promising class of nanomaterials for biomedical applications, such as bioimaging, gene and drug delivery/release, photodynamic therapy (PDT), photothermal therapy (PTT), and environmental sensing. Over the past decade, many reports have been published detailing their synthesis and their various potential applications, including some very comprehensive reviews of these topics. In contrast, there is a distinct lack of overview of the role the stabilizing copolymer shells have on the properties of CPNs. This review attempts to correct this oversight by scrutinizing reports detailing the synthesis and application of CPNs stabilized with some commonly-used copolymers, namely F127 (Pluronic poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(propylene glycol)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate), PSMA (poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride)), PLGA (poly(D, L-lactide-co-glycolide)) and PEG (polyethylene glycol) derivatives. The analysis of the reported physicochemical properties and biological applications of these CPNs provides insights into the advantages of each group of copolymers for specific applications and offers a set of guidance criteria for the selection of an appropriate copolymer when designing CPNs-based probes. Finally, the challenges and outlooks in the field are highlighted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological Interactions of Nanomaterials)
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18 pages, 387 KiB  
Review
Colloidal Behavior and Biodegradation of Engineered Carbon-Based Nanomaterials in Aquatic Environment
by Konstantin Pikula, Seyed Ali Johari and Kirill Golokhvast
Nanomaterials 2022, 12(23), 4149; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano12234149 - 23 Nov 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1626
Abstract
Carbon-based nanomaterials (CNMs) have attracted a growing interest over the last decades. They have become a material commonly used in industry, consumer products, water purification, and medicine. Despite this, the safety and toxic properties of different types of CNMs are still debatable. Multiple [...] Read more.
Carbon-based nanomaterials (CNMs) have attracted a growing interest over the last decades. They have become a material commonly used in industry, consumer products, water purification, and medicine. Despite this, the safety and toxic properties of different types of CNMs are still debatable. Multiple studies in recent years highlight the toxicity of CNMs in relation to aquatic organisms, including bacteria, microalgae, bivalves, sea urchins, and other species. However, the aspects that have significant influence on the toxic properties of CNMs in the aquatic environment are often not considered in research works and require further study. In this work, we summarized the current knowledge of colloidal behavior, transformation, and biodegradation of different types of CNMs, including graphene and graphene-related materials, carbon nanotubes, fullerenes, and carbon quantum dots. The other part of this work represents an overview of the known mechanisms of CNMs’ biodegradation and discusses current research works relating to the biodegradation of CNMs in aquatic species. The knowledge about the biodegradation of nanomaterials will facilitate the development of the principals of “biodegradable-by-design” nanoparticles which have promising application in medicine as nano-carriers and represent lower toxicity and risks for living species and the environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biological Interactions of Nanomaterials)
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