Special Issue "NanoBioMedicine"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Eliana B. Souto
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Guest Editor
Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, 3004-531 Coimbra, Portugal
Interests: drug delivery; drug targeting; active pharmaceutical ingredients; volatile compounds; encapsulation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Elena Sánchez-López
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical Technology and Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy and Food Sciences, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain
Interests: drug delivery systems; nanoparticles; biodegradable nanoparticles; neurodegenerative diseases; ocular drug delivery
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanomaterials have unique physical and chemical properties attributed to their size between 1 and 100 nm. This nano-size range grants them the capacity to interact with different structures within living organisms and exhibit a set of different biological effects. Nanomaterials have been tested in medicine as drug delivery and targeting approaches for biomolecules. The Special Issue on NanoBioMedicine addresses this multidisciplinary field, aiming at discussing the latest developments on bioengineering strategies to improve therapeutic outcomes, by increasing drug bioavailability, drug targeting capacity, reduce acute/chronic toxicity, reduce drug resistance, etc. Colleagues are invited to participate in this Special Issue, by proposing original and review papers that deal with nanomedicines applied in biomedical sciences, with a special focus on targeting capacity of surface-tailored nanoparticles and their toxicological assessment.

Prof. Dr. Eliana B. Souto
Prof. Dr. Elena Sanchez-Lopez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanocarriers
  • nanoparticles
  • drug delivery
  • nanomedicine
  • nanobiotechnology

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Dexibuprofen Biodegradable Nanoparticles: One Step Closer towards a Better Ocular Interaction Study
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(4), 720; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10040720 - 10 Apr 2020
Abstract
Ocular inflammation is one of the most prevalent diseases in ophthalmology, which can affect various parts of the eye or the surrounding tissues. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen, are commonly used to treat ocular inflammation in the form of eye-drops. However, [...] Read more.
Ocular inflammation is one of the most prevalent diseases in ophthalmology, which can affect various parts of the eye or the surrounding tissues. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen, are commonly used to treat ocular inflammation in the form of eye-drops. However, their bioavailability in ocular tissues is very low (less than 5%). Therefore, drug delivery systems such as biodegradable polymeric PLGA nanoparticles constitute a suitable alternative to topical eye administration, as they can improve ocular bioavailability and simultaneously reduce drug induced side effects. Moreover, their prolonged drug release can enhance patient treatment adherence as they require fewer administrations. Therefore, several formulations of PLGA based nanoparticles encapsulating dexibuprofen (active enantiomer of Ibuprofen) were prepared using the solvent displacement method employing different surfactants. The formulations have been characterized and their interactions with a customized lipid corneal membrane model were studied. Ex vivo permeation through ocular tissues and in vivo anti-inflammatory efficacy have also been studied. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NanoBioMedicine)
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Open AccessReview
Nanomedicines for the Delivery of Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs)
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(3), 560; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10030560 - 20 Mar 2020
Abstract
Microbial infections are still among the major public health concerns since several yeasts and fungi, and other pathogenic microorganisms, are responsible for continuous growth of infections and drug resistance against bacteria. Antimicrobial resistance rate is fostering the need to develop new strategies against [...] Read more.
Microbial infections are still among the major public health concerns since several yeasts and fungi, and other pathogenic microorganisms, are responsible for continuous growth of infections and drug resistance against bacteria. Antimicrobial resistance rate is fostering the need to develop new strategies against drug-resistant superbugs. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small peptide-based molecules of 5–100 amino acids in length, with potent and broad-spectrum antimicrobial properties. They are part of the innate immune system, which can represent a minimal risk of resistance development. These characteristics contribute to the description of these molecules as promising new molecules in the development of new antimicrobial drugs. However, efforts in developing new medicines have not resulted in any decrease of drug resistance yet. Thus, a technological approach on improving existing drugs is gaining special interest. Nanomedicine provides easy access to innovative carriers, which ultimately enable the design and development of targeted delivery systems of the most efficient drugs with increased efficacy and reduced toxicity. Based on performance, successful experiments, and considerable market prospects, nanotechnology will undoubtedly lead a breakthrough in biomedical field also for infectious diseases, as there are several nanotechnological approaches that exhibit important roles in restoring antibiotic activity against resistant bacteria. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NanoBioMedicine)
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Open AccessReview
Metal-Based Nanoparticles as Antimicrobial Agents: An Overview
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(2), 292; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10020292 - 09 Feb 2020
Cited by 8
Abstract
Metal-based nanoparticles have been extensively investigated for a set of biomedical applications. According to the World Health Organization, in addition to their reduced size and selectivity for bacteria, metal-based nanoparticles have also proved to be effective against pathogens listed as a priority. Metal-based [...] Read more.
Metal-based nanoparticles have been extensively investigated for a set of biomedical applications. According to the World Health Organization, in addition to their reduced size and selectivity for bacteria, metal-based nanoparticles have also proved to be effective against pathogens listed as a priority. Metal-based nanoparticles are known to have non-specific bacterial toxicity mechanisms (they do not bind to a specific receptor in the bacterial cell) which not only makes the development of resistance by bacteria difficult, but also broadens the spectrum of antibacterial activity. As a result, a large majority of metal-based nanoparticles efficacy studies performed so far have shown promising results in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The aim of this review has been a comprehensive discussion of the state of the art on the use of the most relevant types of metal nanoparticles employed as antimicrobial agents. A special emphasis to silver nanoparticles is given, while others (e.g., gold, zinc oxide, copper, and copper oxide nanoparticles) commonly used in antibiotherapy are also reviewed. The novelty of this review relies on the comparative discussion of the different types of metal nanoparticles, their production methods, physicochemical characterization, and pharmacokinetics together with the toxicological risk encountered with the use of different types of nanoparticles as antimicrobial agents. Their added-value in the development of alternative, more effective antibiotics against multi-resistant Gram-negative bacteria has been highlighted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue NanoBioMedicine)
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