Special Issue "From Molecules to Nanomaterials"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 December 2011).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Jiye (James) Fang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, NY 13902-6000, USA
Interests: synthesis of shape- and size-controlled metallic nanocrystals and their electrocatalytic applications in fuel cells (both anode and cathode); self-assembly and superstructure of nanopolyhedra (both single- and binary compositions); synthesis of semiconductor nanocrystals and their thermoelectric/photovoltaic applications; synthesis of 1D and core-shell structured functional nanomaterials; high-pressure exploration of nanopolyhedron-based superlattices
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanomaterials cross a bridge between bulk materials and substances on atomic/molecular scale. With dimensions generally between 1 and 100 nanometres, nanomaterials have shown various novel and interesting characteristics. The chemical and physical properties of nanomaterials may differ significantly from those of bulk materials, but they may also ‘inherit’ properties from atoms/molecules. There has been a tremendous research interest in studying the scale between molecules and nanomaterials. The combined special issue on “From Molecules to Nanomaterials” for the journals International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067) and Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991) will focus on this transition area. We invite submissions of original research articles or comprehensive reviews on, but not limited to, the following topics:

  • novel characterization method in molecular science and nanomaterials
  • computation and computer modelling of molecules, clusters and/or nanostructures molecular and polymer self-assembly
  • new developments of molecular science in biological, medical and chemical applications (with link to nanomaterials)
  • new synthesis and processing methods for nanostructured materials from molecular precursors
  • manipulation and patterning of low-dimensional materials
  • functionalization and new applications of nanomaterials (with link to molecular sciences)
  • energy-related nanomaterials and hybrid nanocomposite materials
  • novel concepts for nanomaterials and/or molecular sciences

Associate Professor Jiye (James) Fang
Guest Editor

Keywords

  • molecules
  • nanostructures (nanocrystals, nanowires, …)
  • nanocomposite
  • molecular and polymer self-assembly
  • characterization
  • functionalization
  • computation
  • modelling
  • synthesis and nano-manipulation
  • quantum dots

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Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
From Metal Thiobenzoates to Metal Sulfide Nanocrystals: An Experimental and Theoretical Investigation
Nanomaterials 2012, 2(2), 113-133; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano2020113 - 03 Apr 2012
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 4771
Abstract
A simple preparation of metal sulfide nanoparticles via the decomposition of thiobenzoate precursors at room temperature is presented and discussed. Long chain alkylamines were found to mediate the breakdown of metal thiobenzoates, such as those containing Ag, Cu, In and Cd, to produce [...] Read more.
A simple preparation of metal sulfide nanoparticles via the decomposition of thiobenzoate precursors at room temperature is presented and discussed. Long chain alkylamines were found to mediate the breakdown of metal thiobenzoates, such as those containing Ag, Cu, In and Cd, to produce uniform Ag2S, Cu2−xS, In2S3 and CdS nanoparticles respectively. The long chain amines are assumed to play dual roles as the nucleophilic reagent and the capping agent. It was found that sizes of the nanoparticles can be controlled by changing the type of amine used, as well as the molar ratio between amine and the precursor. We performed DFT calculations on a proposed mechanism involving an initial nucleophilic addition of amine molecule onto the thiocarboxylates. The proposed reaction was also confirmed through the analysis of by-products via infrared spectroscopy. On the basis of this understanding, we propose to manipulate the stability of the precursors by coordination with suitable stabilizing groups, such that the reaction kinetics can be modified to generate different nanostructures of interest. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From Molecules to Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle
Synthesis and Size Dependent Reflectance Study of Water Soluble SnS Nanoparticles
Nanomaterials 2012, 2(1), 54-64; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano2010054 - 16 Jan 2012
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 4410
Abstract
Near-monodispersed water soluble SnS nanoparticles in the diameter range of 3–6 nm are synthesized by a facile, solution based one-step approach using ethanolamine ligands. The optimal amount of triethanolamine is investigated. The effect of further heat treatment on the size of these SnS [...] Read more.
Near-monodispersed water soluble SnS nanoparticles in the diameter range of 3–6 nm are synthesized by a facile, solution based one-step approach using ethanolamine ligands. The optimal amount of triethanolamine is investigated. The effect of further heat treatment on the size of these SnS nanoparticles is discussed. Diffuse reflectance study of SnS nanoparticles agrees with predictions from quantum confinement model. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From Molecules to Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle
Study of Alginate-Supported Ionic Liquid and Pd Catalysts
Nanomaterials 2012, 2(1), 31-53; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano2010031 - 11 Jan 2012
Cited by 17 | Viewed by 4415
Abstract
New catalytic materials, based on palladium immobilized in ionic liquid supported on alginate, were elaborated. Alginate was associated with gelatin for the immobilization of ionic liquids (ILs) and the binding of palladium. These catalytic materials were designed in the form of highly porous [...] Read more.
New catalytic materials, based on palladium immobilized in ionic liquid supported on alginate, were elaborated. Alginate was associated with gelatin for the immobilization of ionic liquids (ILs) and the binding of palladium. These catalytic materials were designed in the form of highly porous monoliths (HPMs), in order to be used in a column reactor. The catalytic materials were tested for the hydrogenation of 4-nitroaniline (4-NA) in the presence of formic acid as hydrogen donor. The different parameters for the elaboration of the catalytic materials were studied and their impact analyzed in terms of microstructures, palladium sorption properties and catalytic performances. The characteristics of the biopolymer (proportion of β-D-mannuronic acid (M) and α-L-guluronic acid (G) in the biopolymer defined by the M/G ratio), the concentration of the porogen agent, and the type of coagulating agent significantly influenced catalytic performances. The freezing temperature had a significant impact on structural properties, but hardly affected the catalytic rate. Cellulose fibers were incorporated as mechanical strengthener into the catalytic materials, and allowed to enhance mechanical properties and catalytic efficiency but required increasing the amount of hydrogen donor for catalysis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From Molecules to Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle
Accurate Size and Size-Distribution Determination of Polystyrene Latex Nanoparticles in Aqueous Medium Using Dynamic Light Scattering and Asymmetrical Flow Field Flow Fractionation with Multi-Angle Light Scattering
Nanomaterials 2012, 2(1), 15-30; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano2010015 - 05 Jan 2012
Cited by 55 | Viewed by 6550
Abstract
Accurate determination of the intensity-average diameter of polystyrene latex (PS-latex) by dynamic light scattering (DLS) was carried out through extrapolation of both the concentration of PS-latex and the observed scattering angle. Intensity-average diameter and size distribution were reliably determined by asymmetric flow field [...] Read more.
Accurate determination of the intensity-average diameter of polystyrene latex (PS-latex) by dynamic light scattering (DLS) was carried out through extrapolation of both the concentration of PS-latex and the observed scattering angle. Intensity-average diameter and size distribution were reliably determined by asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (AFFFF) using multi-angle light scattering (MALS) with consideration of band broadening in AFFFF separation. The intensity-average diameter determined by DLS and AFFFF-MALS agreed well within the estimated uncertainties, although the size distribution of PS-latex determined by DLS was less reliable in comparison with that determined by AFFFF-MALS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From Molecules to Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle
Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles with Co-Condensed Gadolinium Chelates for Multimodal Imaging
Nanomaterials 2012, 2(1), 1-14; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano2010001 - 27 Dec 2011
Cited by 21 | Viewed by 5274
Abstract
Several mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) contrast agents have been synthesized using a co-condensation method to incorporate two different Gd3+ complexes at very high loadings (15.5–28.8 wt %). These MSN contrast agents, with an MCM-41 type pore structure, were characterized using a variety [...] Read more.
Several mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) contrast agents have been synthesized using a co-condensation method to incorporate two different Gd3+ complexes at very high loadings (15.5–28.8 wt %). These MSN contrast agents, with an MCM-41 type pore structure, were characterized using a variety of methods including SEM and TEM, nitrogen adsorption measurements, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), direct current plasma (DCP) spectroscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD). The magnetic resonance (MR) relaxivities of these contrast agents were determined using a 3 T MR scanner. The r1 relaxivities of these nanoparticles range from 4.1 to 8.4 mM−1s−1 on a per Gd basis. Additionally, the MSN particles were functionalized with an organic fluorophore and cancer cell targeting peptide to allow for demonstration of both the optical and MR contrast enhancing capabilities in vitro. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From Molecules to Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle
Fabrication of Size-Tunable Metallic Nanoparticles Using Plasmid DNA as a Biomolecular Reactor
Nanomaterials 2011, 1(1), 64-78; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano1010064 - 21 Oct 2011
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 4035
Abstract
Plasmid DNA can be used as a template to yield gold, palladium, silver, and chromium nanoparticles of different sizes based on variations in incubation time at 70 °C with gold phosphine complexes, with the acetates of silver or palladium, or chromium acetylacetonate. The [...] Read more.
Plasmid DNA can be used as a template to yield gold, palladium, silver, and chromium nanoparticles of different sizes based on variations in incubation time at 70 °C with gold phosphine complexes, with the acetates of silver or palladium, or chromium acetylacetonate. The employment of mild synthetic conditions, minimal procedural steps, and aqueous solvents makes this method environmentally greener and ensures general feasibility. The use of plasmids exploits the capabilities of the biotechnology industry as a source of nanoreactor materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From Molecules to Nanomaterials)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Near-Infrared Fluorescent Nanoprobes for in Vivo Optical Imaging
Nanomaterials 2012, 2(2), 92-112; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano2020092 - 30 Mar 2012
Cited by 67 | Viewed by 6588
Abstract
Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probes offer advantages of high photon penetration, reduced light scattering and minimal autofluorescence from living tissues, rendering them valuable for noninvasive mapping of molecular events, assessment of therapeutic efficacy, and monitoring of disease progression in animal models. This review provides [...] Read more.
Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probes offer advantages of high photon penetration, reduced light scattering and minimal autofluorescence from living tissues, rendering them valuable for noninvasive mapping of molecular events, assessment of therapeutic efficacy, and monitoring of disease progression in animal models. This review provides an overview of the recent development of the design and optical property of the different classes of NIR fluorescent nanoprobes associated with in vivo imaging applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue From Molecules to Nanomaterials)
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