Special Issue "Growth and Characterization in Nanowires"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. David Aradilla
Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Goettingen, Tammannstrasse 4, 37077 Goettingen, Germany
Interests: energy storage devices; coatings; electrolytes; electrochemistry; polymers; nanomaterials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanowires, as an innovative one-dimensional (1D) nanostructure, have recently attracted great interest in a wide range of technological applications from photovoltaics, thermoelectrics, electronics, and optics to electrochemical energy storage and conversion devices due to their peculiar physical, morphological, mechanical. and structural properties. At present, a great variety of nanowire-based materials, such as polymers, oxides, nitrides, metals or semiconductors, among others, were achieved by means of numerous experimental procedures. In this direction, a large spectrum of synthesis techniques and theoretical models has allowed us to understand and unveil the enormous potential of nanowires in terms of their performances. However, in spite of the tremendous efforts conducted in the last decade in this domain, important technical challenges regarding the synthesis of novel materials and the comprehension of their performances are critical to accomplish the new perspectives of nanowires in the near future.

The aim of this Special Issue is to bring together the latest developments on experimental synthesis techniques and theoretical models in the area of nanowires, as well as their evaluation in important emergent research fields ranging from energy storage to optoelectronics. Consequently, all researchers are invited to contribute original research results in form of scientific papers, short communications or review-style articles concerning experimental, theoretical, and technological aspects and applications of nanowires.

Dr. David Aradilla
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Electrochemical techniques
  • Modelling
  • In operando techniques
  • Microscopy
  • Spectroscopy
  • Electrochemical energy storage and conversion devices
  • Template-free synthesis
  • Semiconductor nanowires

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
CPP-GMR Performance of Electrochemically Synthesized Co/Cu Multilayered Nanowire Arrays with Extremely Large Aspect Ratio
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10010005 - 18 Dec 2019
Abstract
Anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) films, which have numerous nanochannels ca. 75 nm in diameter, D and ca. 70 µm in length, L (ca. 933 in aspect ratio, L/D), were used as a template material for growing Co/Cu multilayered nanowire arrays. [...] Read more.
Anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) films, which have numerous nanochannels ca. 75 nm in diameter, D and ca. 70 µm in length, L (ca. 933 in aspect ratio, L/D), were used as a template material for growing Co/Cu multilayered nanowire arrays. The multilayered nanowires with alternating Cu layer and Co layers were synthesized by using an electrochemical pulsed-potential deposition technique. The thickness of the Cu layer was adjusted from ca. 2 to 4 nm while that of the Co layer was regulated from ca. 13 to 51 nm by controlling the pulsed potential parameters. To get a Co/Cu multilayered nanowire in an electrochemical in-situ contact with a sputter-deposited Au thin layer, the pulsed potential deposition was continued up to ca. 5000 cycles until the nanowire reached out toward the surface of AAO template. Current-perpendicular-to-plane giant magnetoresistance (CPP-GMR) effect reached up to ca. 23.5% at room temperature in Co/Cu multilayered nanowires with ca. 3500 Co/Cu bilayers (Cu: 1.4 nm and Co: 18.8 nm). When decreasing the thickness of Co layer, the CPP-GMR value increased due to the Valet–Fert model in the long spin diffusion limit. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Growth and Characterization in Nanowires)
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Open AccessCommunication
Charge Storage Properties of Nanostructured Poly (3,4–ethylenedioxythiophene) Electrodes Revealed by Advanced Electrogravimetry
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(7), 962; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9070962 - 01 Jul 2019
Abstract
PEDOT nanowires (NWs) directly grown on the conducting electrode of quartz resonators enable an advanced electrogravimetric analysis of their charge storage behavior. Electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) and its coupling with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (ac–electrogravimetry or AC–EG) were used complementarily and [...] Read more.
PEDOT nanowires (NWs) directly grown on the conducting electrode of quartz resonators enable an advanced electrogravimetric analysis of their charge storage behavior. Electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) and its coupling with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (ac–electrogravimetry or AC–EG) were used complementarily and reveal that TBA+, BF4 and ACN participate in the charge compensation process with different kinetics and quantity. BF4 anions were dominant in terms of concentration over TBA+ cations and the anion transfer results in the exclusion of the solvent molecules. TBA+ concentration variation in the electrode was small compared to that of the BF4 counterpart. However, Mw of TBA+ is much higher than BF4 (242.3 vs. 86.6 g·mol−1). Thus, TBA+ cations’ gravimetric contribution to the EQCM response was more significant than that of BF4. Additional contribution of ACN with an opposite flux direction compared with BF4, led to a net mass gain/lost during a negative/positive potential scan, masking partially the anion response. Such subtleties of the interfacial ion transfer processes were disentangled due to the complementarity of the EQCM and AC–EG methodologies, which were applied here for the characterization of electrochemical processes at the PEDOT NW electrode/organic electrolyte interface. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Growth and Characterization in Nanowires)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Photoluminescence of ZnO Nanowires: A Review
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(5), 857; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10050857 - 29 Apr 2020
Abstract
One-dimensional ZnO nanostructures (nanowires/nanorods) are attractive materials for applications such as gas sensors, biosensors, solar cells, and photocatalysts. This is due to the relatively easy production process of these kinds of nanostructures with excellent charge carrier transport properties and high crystalline quality. In [...] Read more.
One-dimensional ZnO nanostructures (nanowires/nanorods) are attractive materials for applications such as gas sensors, biosensors, solar cells, and photocatalysts. This is due to the relatively easy production process of these kinds of nanostructures with excellent charge carrier transport properties and high crystalline quality. In this work, we review the photoluminescence (PL) properties of single and collective ZnO nanowires and nanorods. As different growth techniques were obtained for the presented samples, a brief review of two popular growth methods, vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) and hydrothermal, is shown. Then, a discussion of the emission process and characteristics of the near-band edge excitonic emission (NBE) and deep-level emission (DLE) bands is presented. Their respective contribution to the total emission of the nanostructure is discussed using the spatial information distribution obtained by scanning transmission electron microscopy−cathodoluminescence (STEM-CL) measurements. Also, the influence of surface effects on the photoluminescence of ZnO nanowires, as well as the temperature dependence, is briefly discussed for both ultraviolet and visible emissions. Finally, we present a discussion of the size reduction effects of the two main photoluminescent bands of ZnO. For a wide emission (near ultra-violet and visible), which has sometimes been attributed to different origins, we present a summary of the different native point defects or trap centers in ZnO as a cause for the different deep-level emission bands. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Growth and Characterization in Nanowires)
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