Special Issue "Green Synthesis of Nanoparticles and Nanostructured Coatings with Antibacterial Properties"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. José Miguel García-Martín
Website
Guest Editor
Instituto de Micro y Nanotecnología, IMN-CNM, CSIC, Spain
Interests: biomaterials, implants; antibacterial coatings; antimicrobial nanoparticles; anticancer nanoparticles; electrical stimulation of cells; magnetron sputtering; magnetic force microscopy; magnetic nanostructures; plasmonic nanostructures

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A major problem facing the global health-care system nowadays is the great adaptability that some infectious bacteria have to invade body tissues and colonize biomaterial surfaces. In fact, due to the relentless appearance of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains, bacterial infections will cause more deaths than all types of cancer together in the year 2050 if the current trend continues.

Nanomaterials are interesting to fight bacterial infections. Due to their small dimensions, nanoparticles can easily interact with bacteria and even penetrate the bacterial membrane. Moreover, they exhibit higher reactivity compared to their respective bulk materials due to their high surface area to volume ratio. On the other hand, nanostructured coatings can inhibit bacterial adhesion (non-fouling surfaces) and even possess antimicrobial agents to destroy a bacterial biofilm.

The fabrication of nanomaterials in a safe, environmentally-friendly and cost-effective manner is of the utmost importance. In particular, a promising approach is given by green chemistry: the use of living organisms (such as bacteria, human cells, fungi or plants), dietary and organic natural compounds (such as coffee, tea, citric or honey extracts, to name a few) and biological waste material coming from industrial plants, as efficient raw materials for the synthesis of nanoparticles.

This Special Issue of Nanomaterials will attempt to cover the recent advancements in the environmentally-friendly production of nanoparticles and nanostructured coatings that exhibit antibacterial properties.

Dr. José Miguel García-Martín
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Green Nanotechnology
  • Environmentally-friendly Production of Nanomaterials
  • Green Chemistry
  • Bacterial Biofilm
  • Antibacterial Activity
  • Preventing Infection
  • Antifouling Surfaces
  • Combating Infection
  • Antimicrobial Effects

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Open AccessReview
Flower-Based Green Synthesis of Metallic Nanoparticles: Applications beyond Fragrance
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(4), 766; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10040766 - 16 Apr 2020
Abstract
Green synthesis has gained wide attention as a sustainable, reliable, and eco-friendly approach to the synthesis of a variety of nanomaterials, including hybrid materials, metal/metal oxide nanoparticles, and bioinspired materials. Plant flowers contain diverse secondary compounds, including pigments, volatile substances contributing to fragrance, [...] Read more.
Green synthesis has gained wide attention as a sustainable, reliable, and eco-friendly approach to the synthesis of a variety of nanomaterials, including hybrid materials, metal/metal oxide nanoparticles, and bioinspired materials. Plant flowers contain diverse secondary compounds, including pigments, volatile substances contributing to fragrance, and other phenolics that have a profound ethnobotanical relevance, particularly in relation to the curing of diseases by ‘Pushpa Ayurveda’ or floral therapy. These compounds can be utilized as potent reducing agents for the synthesis of a variety of metal/metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs), such as gold, silver, copper, zinc, iron, and cadmium. Phytochemicals from flowers can act both as reducing and stabilizing agents, besides having a role as precursor molecules for the formation of NPs. Furthermore, the synthesis is mostly performed at ambient room temperatures and is eco-friendly, as no toxic derivatives are formed. The NPs obtained exhibit unique and diverse properties, which can be harnessed for a variety of applications in different fields. This review reports the use of a variety of flower extracts for the green synthesis of several types of metallic nanoparticles and their applications. This review shows that flower extract was mainly used to design gold and silver nanoparticles, while other metals and metal oxides were less explored in relation to this synthesis. Flower-derived silver nanoparticles show good antibacterial, antioxidant, and insecticidal activities and can be used in different applications. Full article
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