Special Issue "Fluorescence Nanoprobes: From Synthesis to Applications"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 January 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Mingqian Tan
Website
Guest Editor
School of Food Science and Technology, Dalian Polytechnic University, Dalian 116034, Liaoning, China
Interests: imaging-guided delivery; molecular targeting; molecule encapsulation; food nanotechnology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fluorescence nanoprobes refer to nanostructures that can re-emit light upon light excitation for the detection of specific target locations and activation, identifying protein interactions and conformation changes in any chemical or biological processes in vitro and in vivo. Fluorescence nanoprobes have shown their unique properties because of their strongly fluorescent signal, excellent photostability, enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, as well as versatile surface chemistry for various applications. The performance of the fluorescence nanoprobes is highly dependent on the design strategy and chemical synthesis methods. This Special Issue of Nanomaterials, “Fluorescence Nanoprobes: From Synthesis to Applications”, aims at collecting research articles that report the design, characterization, and prospective applications of fluorescence nanoprobes in molecular imaging, molecular interaction, image-guided delivery and release, theranostics and various target analysis, in a wide range of research fields, including nanotechnology, biotechnology, biomedical engineering and nanomedicine. The format of full papers, communications, and reviews is welcomed.          

Prof. Dr. Mingqian Tan
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • fluorescence
  • nanoprobes
  • nanomaterials synthesis and characterizations
  • molecular imaging
  • quantum dots
  • carbon dots
  • surface modification
  • theranostics
  • silica nanoparticles

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Carbon Nano-Onions as Non-Cytotoxic Carriers for Cellular Uptake of Glycopeptides and Proteins
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(8), 1069; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9081069 - 25 Jul 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Carbon nano-onions (CNOs) possess favorable properties that make them suitable for biomedical applications, including their small size, ready surface modification, and good biocompatibility. Here, we report the covalent immobilization of a synthetic glycopeptide and the protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) onto the surface [...] Read more.
Carbon nano-onions (CNOs) possess favorable properties that make them suitable for biomedical applications, including their small size, ready surface modification, and good biocompatibility. Here, we report the covalent immobilization of a synthetic glycopeptide and the protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) onto the surface of carbon nano-onions using the maleimide–thiol “addition reaction”. The glycopeptide and BSA are readily transported inside different cell lines, together with carbon nano-onions, through the endocytosis pathway. Our results show that carbon nano-onions are excellent scaffolds for glycopeptides and proteins immobilization and act as intracellular carriers for these biomolecules. These findings open new perspectives in the application of carbon nano-onions as intracellular transporters in diverse biomedical applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluorescence Nanoprobes: From Synthesis to Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Density Gradient Selection of Colloidal Silver Nanotriangles for Assembling Dye-Particle Plasmophores
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(6), 893; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9060893 - 18 Jun 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
A simple method based on sucrose density gradient centrifugation is proposed here for the fractionation of colloidal silver nanotriangles. This method afforded particle fractions with surface plasmon resonances, spanning from red to infrared spectral ranges that could be used to tune optical properties [...] Read more.
A simple method based on sucrose density gradient centrifugation is proposed here for the fractionation of colloidal silver nanotriangles. This method afforded particle fractions with surface plasmon resonances, spanning from red to infrared spectral ranges that could be used to tune optical properties for plasmonic applications. This feature was exemplified by selecting silver nanotriangle samples with spectral overlap with Atto-655 dye’s absorption and emission in order to assemble dye-particle plasmophores. The emission brightness of an individual plasmophore, as characterized by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, is at least 1000-fold more intense than that of a single Atto-655 dye label, which renders them as promising platforms for the development of fluorescence-based nanosensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluorescence Nanoprobes: From Synthesis to Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Facile Fabrication of Fluorescent Inorganic Nanoparticles with Diverse Shapes for Cell Imaging
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(2), 154; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9020154 - 26 Jan 2019
Abstract
In the present work, we describe a facile and general method of fabricating fluorescent inorganic nanoparticles with diverse shapes for cell imaging application. The hematite (α-Fe2O3) nanoparticles (HNPs) with three different shapes (i.e., spindle shape, ellipsoidal shape and quasi-spherical [...] Read more.
In the present work, we describe a facile and general method of fabricating fluorescent inorganic nanoparticles with diverse shapes for cell imaging application. The hematite (α-Fe2O3) nanoparticles (HNPs) with three different shapes (i.e., spindle shape, ellipsoidal shape and quasi-spherical shape) were first prepared as model systems in consideration of good biocompatibility and the controllable morphology of α-Fe2O3. Three fluorescent HNPs with different shapes were readily achieved via one-pot sol-gel reaction of AIE luminogen-functionalized siloxane (AIEgen-Si(OCH3)3) and TEOS in the presence of PVP-stabilized HNPs. Due to the fluorescence originating from the thin AIEgens-contained SiO2 shell around the HNPs, their photoluminescent intensities can be tuned by changing the concentrations of TEOS and AIEgen-Si(OCH3)3 in feed prior to the sol-gel reaction. When the as-prepared fluorescent products were dispersed in water, they gave intense green light emission upon excitation at 360 nm with relatively high fluorescence quantum yield. Further, fluorescent HNPs exhibited low cytotoxicity and excellent photostability and, thus, were used as optical probes to preliminarily explore the effect of nanoparticle shapes on their cellular uptake behaviors. This work should open a facile way to prepare various fluorescent inorganic nanoparticles with specific morphology for various biological applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fluorescence Nanoprobes: From Synthesis to Applications)
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