Special Issue "Cellulose Based Nanomaterials and Their Applications"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Synthesis, Interfaces and Nanostructures".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 January 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Yaman Boluk
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering; University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
Interests: cellulose nanocrystals; cellulose nanofibrils; electrospinning; colloids and surfaces; soft matter; food packaging; cement and concrete; composites; drilling muds

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Rod-shaped cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) with negatively charged half ester sulfate groups are prepared on an industrial scale by sulfuric acid hydrolysis of cellulose feedstock. Acid hydrolysis removes the amorphous segments of cellulose fibrils and releases homogenous, rod-shaped, defect-free crystallites. When the targeted level of degree of depolymerization is reached, hydrolysis is terminated by rapid dilution and then neutralization of the acid. Other methods, based on carboxylation of cellulose, either by using a 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO) or ammonium persulfate (APS) treatments, are mostly used to produce longer-aspect-ratio cellulose nanofibers (CNFs). Cellulose-based nanomaterials including but not limited to cellulose nanocrystals and cellulose nanofibers have attracted a great deal of attention, because of their surface modification potentials and size-dependent physical properties. They are investigated as promising materials for integration into various materials for a wide range of applications, including composites, biomaterials, sensors, soft electronics, and coatings.

This Special Issue of ‘’Cellulose-Based Nanomaterials and Their Applications’’ will attempt to cover the recent advancements in the applications of cellulose-based nanomaterials.

Prof. Dr. Yaman Boluk
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cellulose
  • cellulose nanocrystals
  • cellulose nanofibrils
  • electrospinning
  • composites
  • biomaterials
  • sensors
  • soft electronics
  • coatings
  • food packaging

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Coloration and Chromatic Sensing Behavior of Electrospun Cellulose Fibers with Curcumin
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(1), 222; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11010222 (registering DOI) - 16 Jan 2021
Abstract
The effective approach for coloration and chromatic sensing of electrospun cellulose fabrics with a natural colorant, curcumin, is demonstrated. To achieve high surface area, the morphology of fiber was controlled to have rough and porous surface through an electrospinning of a cellulose acetate [...] Read more.
The effective approach for coloration and chromatic sensing of electrospun cellulose fabrics with a natural colorant, curcumin, is demonstrated. To achieve high surface area, the morphology of fiber was controlled to have rough and porous surface through an electrospinning of a cellulose acetate (CA) solution under optimized electrospinning parameters and solvent system. The resulting CA fibers were treated with a curcumin dye/NaOH ethanol solution, in which deacetylation of the CA fiber and high-quality coloration with curcumin were simultaneously achieved. As a control, a cotton fiber with similar diameter and smooth surface morphology was treated by the same method, resulting in poor coloration quality. The difference can be attributed to high surface area as well as trapping of dye molecules inside of cellulose fiber during deacetylation. Both fibers were further utilized for a chromatic sensing application for specific toxic gases. The incorporated curcumin dye responded to hydrogen chloride and ammonia gases reversibly via keto-enol tautomerism, and, as a consequence, the color was reversibly changed between reddish-brown and yellow colors. The cellulose fiber fabricated by the electrospinning showed ten times higher and two times quicker responsiveness compared to curcumin-colored cotton fiber sample prepared with the same immersion method. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cellulose Based Nanomaterials and Their Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Entrapment of Hydrophobic Biocides into Cellulose Acetate Nanoparticles by Nanoprecipitation
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(12), 2447; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10122447 - 07 Dec 2020
Abstract
This contribution reports an efficient method for the production and use of biocide-loaded cellulose acetate nanoparticles. As well-known model biocides 4-Hexylresorcinol and Triclosan were used for in situ nanoparticle loading during a nanoprecipitation process. We show that the nanoparticle size can be well-controlled [...] Read more.
This contribution reports an efficient method for the production and use of biocide-loaded cellulose acetate nanoparticles. As well-known model biocides 4-Hexylresorcinol and Triclosan were used for in situ nanoparticle loading during a nanoprecipitation process. We show that the nanoparticle size can be well-controlled by variation of the cellulose acetate concentration during nanoprecipitation. Apart from strong evidence suggesting cellulose acetate particle formation according to a nucleation-aggregation mechanism, we further show that the biocide loading of the particles occurs by a diffusion process and not via co-precipitation. The quantity of particle loading was analyzed by 1H-NMR spectroscopy of re-dissolved nanoparticles, and it was observed that a decisive factor for high packaging efficiency is the use of a biocide with low water solubility and high hydrophobicity. SEM studies showed no influence on the particle morphology or size by both biocides 4-Hexylresorcinol and Triclosan. Finally, an aqueous nanoparticle dispersion can be coated onto model paper sheets to yield pronounced antimicrobial surface-properties. Nanoparticles loaded with the biocide Triclosan showed a high antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis, a cellulase producing bacteria, if applied to model paper substrates, even at extremely low coating weights of 1–5 g/m2, respectively. Additional long-term efficacy renders these nanoparticles ideal for various applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cellulose Based Nanomaterials and Their Applications)
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