Special Issue "The Synthesis and Applications of Carbon Nanotubes"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (26 February 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Francisco Márquez
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Guest Editor
Nanomaterials Research Group-NRG, School of Natural Sciences and Technology, Universidad Ana G. Méndez-Gurabo Campus, 00778PR, USA
Interests: catalysis, carbon nanotubes, hydrogen, photodegradation, Li-ion batteries
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Carmen Morant
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Coatings and Nanostructures, Department of Applied Physics Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain
Interests: Li-ion batteries, silicon nanowires, carbon nanotubes, membranes, nanotribology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since the beginning of the 1990s, and after its discovery by Iijima, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have experienced an extraordinary scientific interest, owing to their exceptional mechanical, electrical and thermal properties. The synthesis procedures described up to now are very varied (chemical vapor deposition, arc-discharge, laser ablation and sol-gel methods), producing materials with different characteristics, aspect ratios, and potential uses. CNTs have a very wide range of applications, in fields as heterogeneous as chemistry, technology, medicine, engineering, or materials science. CNTs modified by combination with foreign materials (for example, atoms, molecules, chemical groups, or crystals) have new or improved chemical reactivity properties, which the pristine CNTs do not possess. One of the objectives of this Special Issue is to delve into the various procedures of synthesis, characterization and chemical modification of CNTs. This issue covers key technological developments and scientific challenges for a wide range of CNTs applications, emphasizing current and potential applications in the short and medium term.

This Special Issue is an ideal platform to disseminate the most outstanding scientific results that constitute the state-of-the-art of these unprecedented materials.

Prof. Dr. Francisco Márquez
Dr. Carmen Morant
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nanocarbons: Graphene, Graphite, Carbon Nanotubes, Carbon Fibers and Fullerenes
  • Functionalisation and Properties
  • Synthesis Methods: CVD, Arc Discharge, Laser Ablation
  • Characterization Tools: Electron Microscopy (SEM and TEM), Raman, Luminescence
  • Applications in Chemistry, Technology, Medicine, Engineering, Material Science, etc.

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Creation of Superhydrophobic Coatings Based on MWCNTs Xerogel
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(11), 1584; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9111584 - 08 Nov 2019
Abstract
The creation of hydrophobic anti-icing and self–cleaning coatings is a relevant task for many industrial sectors. The potential field of application includes production of liquid and gas separators and filters, the field of textiles and clothing, construction and new materials, optical and microelectronic [...] Read more.
The creation of hydrophobic anti-icing and self–cleaning coatings is a relevant task for many industrial sectors. The potential field of application includes production of liquid and gas separators and filters, the field of textiles and clothing, construction and new materials, optical and microelectronic devices, the field of automobile construction and maritime shipping as well as energy and agriculture. The article suggests a new approach to the creation of superhydrophobic anti-icing coatings, by drawing peeled multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to the sample surface. This method allows you to combine the necessary factors: Low surface energy, micro-nano-roughness and hierarchical multi-scale. The authors investigated the dependence of the wetting angle of such a surface on the model of MWCNT, fractional composition and the polarity of the dissolvent. The suggested approach can be used to create superhydrophobic coatings with the additional function of removing static charge and heating the surface, which can be used in the field of energetics for protection against freezing of wind turbine blades and aircraft surfaces. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Synthesis and Applications of Carbon Nanotubes)
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Open AccessArticle
Synthesis Procedure of Highly Densely Packed Carbon Nanotube Forests on TiN
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(4), 571; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9040571 - 08 Apr 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The goal of this research was to obtain high-density single-walled carbon nanotube forests (SWNTs) on conductive substrates for different applications, including field emission. For this, dip-coating was chosen as the catalyst deposition method, to subsequently grow SWNTs by Alcohol Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition [...] Read more.
The goal of this research was to obtain high-density single-walled carbon nanotube forests (SWNTs) on conductive substrates for different applications, including field emission. For this, dip-coating was chosen as the catalyst deposition method, to subsequently grow SWNTs by Alcohol Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition (AC-CVD). Si (100) was chosen as the substrate, which was then coated with a TiN thin film. By sputtering with Ar, it was possible to generate alternating TiN and Si lanes, with a different wettability and, therefore, a different affinity for the catalysts. As a result, the Mo-Co catalyst was mainly deposited on TiN and not on sputtered-Si, which allowed the selective growth of SWNT forests on the TiN conductive surfaces. These as-synthesized SWNTs were used for field emission measurements in a high vacuum chamber. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Synthesis and Applications of Carbon Nanotubes)
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Open AccessArticle
The Effect of Thermal Contact Number on the Tube–Tube Contact Conductance of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(3), 477; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9030477 - 23 Mar 2019
Abstract
The contact conductance of single, double, and triple thermal contacts of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. Our results showed that the effect of the thermal contact number on the contact conductance was not as strong as previously reported. [...] Read more.
The contact conductance of single, double, and triple thermal contacts of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. Our results showed that the effect of the thermal contact number on the contact conductance was not as strong as previously reported. The percentages of contact conductance of double and triple thermal contacts were about 72% and 67%, respectively, compared to that of a single thermal contact. Moreover, we found that the contact conductance of the double and triple thermal contacts was associated with the SWCNT length and the positional relationship of the thermal contacts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Synthesis and Applications of Carbon Nanotubes)
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Open AccessArticle
Characterization of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Forests Grown on Stainless Steel Surfaces
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(3), 444; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9030444 - 15 Mar 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) forests are a particularly interesting class of nanomaterials, because they combine multifunctional properties, such as high energy absorption, compressive strength, recoverability, and super-hydrophobicity with light weight. These characteristics make them suitable for application as coating, protective layers, and [...] Read more.
Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) forests are a particularly interesting class of nanomaterials, because they combine multifunctional properties, such as high energy absorption, compressive strength, recoverability, and super-hydrophobicity with light weight. These characteristics make them suitable for application as coating, protective layers, and antifouling substrates for metallic pipelines and blades. Direct growth of CNT forests on metals offers the possibility of transferring the tunable CNT functionalities directly onto the desired substrates. Here, we focus on characterizing the structure and mechanical properties, as well as wettability and adhesion, of CNT forests grown on different types of stainless steel. We investigate the correlations between composition and morphology of the steel substrates with the micro-structure of the CNTs and reveal how the latter ultimately controls the mechanical and wetting properties of the CNT forest. Additionally, we study the influence of substrate morphology on the adhesion of CNTs to their substrate. We highlight that the same structure-property relationships govern the mechanical performance of CNT forests grown on steels and on Si. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Synthesis and Applications of Carbon Nanotubes)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
High Ampacity Carbon Nanotube Materials
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(3), 383; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9030383 - 06 Mar 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Constant evolution of technology is leading to the improvement of electronical devices. Smaller, lighter, faster, are but a few of the properties that have been constantly improved, but these developments come hand in hand with negative downsides. In the case of miniaturization, this [...] Read more.
Constant evolution of technology is leading to the improvement of electronical devices. Smaller, lighter, faster, are but a few of the properties that have been constantly improved, but these developments come hand in hand with negative downsides. In the case of miniaturization, this shortcoming is found in the inherent property of conducting materials—the limit of current density they can withstand before failure. This property, known as ampacity, is close to reaching its limits at the current scales of use, and the performances of some conductors such as gold or copper suffer severely from it. The need to find alternative conductors with higher ampacity is, therefore, an urgent need, but at the same time, one which requires simultaneous search for decreased density if it is to succeed in an ever-growing electronical world. The uses of these carbon nanotube-based materials, from airplane lightning strike protection systems to the microchip industry, will be evaluated, failure mechanisms at maximum current densities explained, limitations and difficulties in ampacity measurements with different size ranges evaluated, and future lines of research suggested. This review will therefore provide an in-depth view of the rare properties that make carbon nanotubes and their hybrids unique. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Synthesis and Applications of Carbon Nanotubes)
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