Special Issue "Carbon Nanoparticles for Strain Sensing and Damage Monitoring"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 October 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. María Sánchez
Website
Guest Editor
Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Materials Science and Engineering Area, C/Tulipan s/n Mostoles 28933, Madrid, Spain
Interests: multifunctional composites; structural health monitoring; strain sensor; damage monitoring; graphene nanoplatelets; carbon nanotubes
Prof. Alejandro Ureña
Website
Guest Editor
Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Materials Science and Engineering Area, C/Tulipan s/n Mostoles 28933, Madrid, Spain
Interests: Manufacturing and behavior characterization (mechanical, electric and thermal) of multifunctional composite materials (carbon fiber, thermosetting resins) by the incorporation of nanoparticles (carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoparticles)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the last few decades, the development of structural health monitoring systems has attracted the interest of industry. Strain sensors based on carbon nanoparticles, such as carbon nanotubes, are increasingly being thought of as a realistic alternative to conventional sensors based on metallic and semiconducting materials, largely due to their superior electrical properties. The addition of carbon fillers to polymer matrices allows the formation of an electrical network that gives the material a high piezoresistivity.

These doped polymer matrices can be manufactured in different forms, such as flexible sensors that can be attached on a substrate, conductive adhesives that can detect crack propagation along bonded joints, etc. Another possibility is to use these matrices in fiber-reinforced polymers for the detection of failure. In this case, the incorporation of carbon nanofiller could also be used in the creation of a coating on traditional fiber fabrics for strain/damage monitoring of the composite material.

This Special Issue of Nanomaterials will attempt to cover the recent advances in carbon nanoparticles for strain and damage sensor applications, including the analysis of electrical conductivity and piezoresistivity of carbon nanoparticles/polymer nanocomposites, the relationship between them, the tunneling effect, sensitivity to different load modes, theoretical and numerical studies, etc.

Dr. María Sánchez
Prof. Alejandro Ureña
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • carbon nanoparticles
  • functional composites
  • strain sensor
  • damage detection
  • structural health monitoring
  • electrical properties

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Preparation and Characterization of Polypropylene/Carbon Nanotubes (PP/CNTs) Nanocomposites as Potential Strain Gauges for Structural Health Monitoring
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(4), 814; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10040814 - 24 Apr 2020
Abstract
Polypropylene/carbon nanotubes (PP/CNTs) nanocomposites with different CNTs concentrations (i.e., 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7 wt%) were prepared and tested as strain gauges for structures monitoring. Such sensors were embedded in cementitious mortar prisms and tested in 3-point bending mode recording impedance variation [...] Read more.
Polypropylene/carbon nanotubes (PP/CNTs) nanocomposites with different CNTs concentrations (i.e., 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7 wt%) were prepared and tested as strain gauges for structures monitoring. Such sensors were embedded in cementitious mortar prisms and tested in 3-point bending mode recording impedance variation at increasing load. First, thermal (differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA)), mechanical (tensile tests) and morphological (FE-SEM) properties of nanocomposites blends were assessed. Then, strain-sensing tests were carried out on PP/CNTs strips embedded in cementitious mortars. PP/CNTs nanocomposites blends with CNTs content of 1, 2 and 3 wt% did not show significant results because these concentrations are below the electrical percolation threshold (EPT). On the contrary, PP/CNTs nanocomposites with 5 and 7 wt% of CNTs showed interesting sensing properties. In particular, the best result was highlighted for the PP/CNT nanocomposite with 5 wt% CNTs for which an average gauge factor (GF) of approx. 1400 was measured. Moreover, load-unload cycles reported a good recovery of the initial impedance. Finally, a comparison with some literature results, in terms of GF, was done demonstrating the benefits deriving from the use of PP/CNTs strips as strain-gauges instead of using conductive fillers in the bulk matrix. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Nanoparticles for Strain Sensing and Damage Monitoring)
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Open AccessArticle
Damage Monitoring of Structural Resins Loaded with Carbon Fillers: Experimental and Theoretical Study
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(3), 434; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10030434 - 29 Feb 2020
Abstract
In the present study, nanocomposite materials for structural applications with self-sensing properties are proposed. In particular, suitable processing of epoxy resins filled with carbon nanotubes and expanded graphite characterized by very different aspect ratio leads to nanocomposite systems with high glass transition temperatures [...] Read more.
In the present study, nanocomposite materials for structural applications with self-sensing properties are proposed. In particular, suitable processing of epoxy resins filled with carbon nanotubes and expanded graphite characterized by very different aspect ratio leads to nanocomposite systems with high glass transition temperatures and remarkable values of the gauge factor. In particular, this notable property ranges between four, for composites filled with one-dimensional nanofiller, and 39 for composites with two-dimensional (2D) graphite derivatives. The greater sensitivity of the 2D system against permanent deformations is interpreted on the basis of an empirical mathematical model and morphological descriptions. The larger inter-contact area among the graphite layers determines a larger contact resistance change than that occurring among carbon nanotubes. The proposed systems turn out to be very advantageous in strain-sensor applications where damage detection is a key requirement to guarantee the reliability of the structures and the safety of the end-users. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Nanoparticles for Strain Sensing and Damage Monitoring)
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Open AccessArticle
Rapid Microwave Polymerization of Porous Nanocomposites with Piezoresistive Sensing Function
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(2), 233; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10020233 - 29 Jan 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
In this paper, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) nanocomposites with piezoresistive sensing function were fabricated using microwave irradiation. The effects of precuring time on the mechanical and electrical properties of nanocomposites were investigated. The increased viscosity and possible nanofiller re-agglomeration during [...] Read more.
In this paper, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) nanocomposites with piezoresistive sensing function were fabricated using microwave irradiation. The effects of precuring time on the mechanical and electrical properties of nanocomposites were investigated. The increased viscosity and possible nanofiller re-agglomeration during the precuring process caused decreased microwave absorption, resulting in extended curing times, and decreased porosity and electrical conductivity in the cured nanocomposites. The porosity generated during the microwave-curing process was investigated with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and density measurements. Increased loadings of MWCNTs resulted in shortened curing times and an increased number of small well-dispersed closed-cell pores. The mechanical properties of the synthesized nanocomposites including stress–strain behaviors and Young’s Modulus were examined. Experimental results demonstrated that the synthesized nanocomposites with 2.5 wt. % MWCNTs achieved the highest piezoresistive sensitivity with an average gauge factor of 7.9 at 10% applied strain. The piezoresistive responses of these nanocomposites were characterized under compressive loads at various maximum strains, loading rates, and under viscoelastic stress relaxation conditions. The 2.5 wt. % nanocomposite was successfully used in an application as a skin-attachable compression sensor for human motion detection including squeezing a golf ball. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Nanoparticles for Strain Sensing and Damage Monitoring)
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