Special Issue "Emergent Quantum Phenomena in Low-Dimensional Heterostructures: from Theory to Devices"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Francesco Romeo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Dipartimento di Fisica “E. R. Caianiello”, Università di Salerno, I-84084 Fisciano (SA), Italy
Interests: emergent properties in quantum matter, also including topological aspects; quantum transport theory; slave-particle theories of correlated fermions; low-dimensional heterostructures; graphene and two-dimensional materials; topological insulators; mesoscopic superconductivity; correlation effects in quantum dots

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,                

Modern fabrication techniques allow the manipulation of matter at the nanoscale; thus, nanostructures presenting heterogeneous electronic properties can be obtained. These nanoarchitectures are the natural playground to study quantum matter, the latter being realized when the quantum behavior of the constituents significantly affects the system properties. Quantum matter presents sometimes emergent properties, of which superconductivity is a paradigmatic example. Emergent properties in quantum matter systems may require the notion of topological order, which is a relevant concept in topological insulators and topological superconductors.

The purpose of the Special Issue is to collect state-of-the-art contributions dealing with the characterization and modelling of low-dimensional heterostructures involving topological insulators, mesoscopic superconductors, graphene and other two-dimensional materials or thin films, and quantum dots with strong electronic correlations.

Contributions have to describe, among other potential topics, emergent quantum behaviors in low-dimensional heterostructures, such as topological phase transitions, surface or edge quantum states, proximity effects, anomalous scattering mechanisms (e.g., the Andreev reflection mechanism), etc.

Although both purely theoretical or experimental works (in the form of research papers or review articles) are welcomed, contributions in which the theoretical formulation is able to explain or provide insight into a real device response are preferred and solicited.

Dr. Francesco Romeo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Characterization and modelling of low-dimensional heterostructures
  • Emergent behaviors in heterostructures: Topological phase transitions, edge quantum states, proximity effects, anomalous scattering mechanisms (e.g., the Andreev reflection mechanism), etc.
  • Theories of strongly correlated fermions based on the slave-particle formulation and applications to real devices

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Unveiling Signatures of Topological Phases in Open Kitaev Chains and Ladders
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(6), 894; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9060894 - 18 Jun 2019
Abstract
In this work, the general problem of the characterization of the topological phase of an open quantum system is addressed. In particular, we study the topological properties of Kitaev chains and ladders under the perturbing effect of a current flux injected into the [...] Read more.
In this work, the general problem of the characterization of the topological phase of an open quantum system is addressed. In particular, we study the topological properties of Kitaev chains and ladders under the perturbing effect of a current flux injected into the system using an external normal lead and derived from it via a superconducting electrode. After discussing the topological phase diagram of the isolated systems, using a scattering technique within the Bogoliubov–de Gennes formulation, we analyze the differential conductance properties of these topological devices as a function of all relevant model parameters. The relevant problem of implementing local spectroscopic measurements to characterize topological systems is also addressed by studying the system electrical response as a function of the position and the distance of the normal electrode (tip). The results show how the signatures of topological order affect the electrical response of the analyzed systems, a subset of which being robust also against the effects of a moderate amount of disorder. The analysis of the internal modes of the nanodevices demonstrates that topological protection can be lost when quantum states of an initially isolated topological system are hybridized with those of the external reservoirs. The conclusions of this work could be useful in understanding the topological phases of nanowire-based mesoscopic devices. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop