Special Issue "Nanocellulose: Synthesis and Versatile Applications"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 November 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Sampo Tuukkanen
Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Medical Sciences and Biotechnology,Tampere University, Tampere, Finland
Interests: Supercapacitors; Piezoelectric sensors; Energy harvesting and storage devices; Biomedical microdevices; Biomeasurements; Processing and characterization of nanomaterial and biomaterials; Scalable manufacturing using printing techniques
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It has been shown recently that nanocellulose is a potential bio-based, renewable, and disposable material of the future. Nanocellulose has potential applications in many different areas, such as food packaging, electronics substrate, sensors, composite materials, nutrition, medicine, and so on. There is a range of nanomaterials which go under the umbrella of nanocellulose, such as nano/micro-fibrillated cellulose, cellulose nanocrystals, and bacterial cellulose. The sources of nanocellulose are practically unlimited, as long as something grows on the earth, which is a desired future aspect. Nanocellulose has exceptional mechanical properties, which makes it interesting for composite hardening. Nanocellulose is also biocompatible, which makes it interesting for medical applications, for example, as stem cell culturing and tissue engineering, as well as vision of organ-on-a-chip applications. Cellulose nanocrystals possess a fundamental property of piezoelectricity, which is promising for sensor applications. One of the most tempting applications of nanocellulose would be the replacement of fossil-fuel-based plastics with this sustainable and, thus, remarkable material.

The aim of this Special Issue is to gather new achievements in the area of nanocellulose, ranging from manufacturing to the versatility of potential applications. Both experimental and theoretical aspects are welcome, as long as there is a clear vision of applicability and usability of this future material. We hope to get a huge range of reports from various points of view, since this field is still relatively new and there is a lot of room for new ideas and innovations. Here, I will cite the honorable physicist Richard Feynmann, who visualized the potential of nanotechnology and nanomaterials as a solution for future challenges and applications: “There's plenty of room at the bottom.”

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Sampo Tuukkanen
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • nanocellulose
  • nanofibrillated cellulose
  • microfibrillated cellulose
  • cellulose nanocrystals

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Preparation and Properties of Cassava Residue Cellulose Nanofibril/Cassava Starch Composite Films
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(4), 755; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10040755 - 15 Apr 2020
Abstract
Because of its non-toxic, pollution-free, and low-cost advantages, environmentally-friendly packaging is receiving widespread attention. However, using simple technology to prepare environmentally-friendly packaging with excellent comprehensive performance is a difficult problem faced by the world. This paper reports a very simple and environmentally-friendly method. [...] Read more.
Because of its non-toxic, pollution-free, and low-cost advantages, environmentally-friendly packaging is receiving widespread attention. However, using simple technology to prepare environmentally-friendly packaging with excellent comprehensive performance is a difficult problem faced by the world. This paper reports a very simple and environmentally-friendly method. The hydroxyl groups of cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) were modified by introducing malic acid and the silane coupling agent KH-550, and the modified CNF were added to cassava starch as a reinforcing agent to prepare film with excellent mechanical, hydrophobic, and barrier properties. In addition, due to the addition of malic acid and a silane coupling agent, the dispersibility and thermal stability of the modified CNFs became significantly better. By adjusting the order of adding the modifiers, the hydrophobicity of the CNFs and thermal stability were increased by 53.5% and 36.9% ± 2.7%, respectively. At the same time, the addition of modified CNFs increased the tensile strength, hydrophobicity, and water vapor transmission coefficient of the starch-based composite films by 1034%, 129.4%, and 35.95%, respectively. This material can be widely used in the packaging of food, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, and medical consumables. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocellulose: Synthesis and Versatile Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
Mobility of Cellulose Nanocrystals in Porous Media: Effects of Ionic Strength, Iron Oxides, and Soil Colloids
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(2), 348; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10020348 - 18 Feb 2020
Abstract
Understanding the dispersivity and migration of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) in porous media is important for exploring their potential for soil and water remediation. In this study, a series of saturated column experiments were conducted to investigate the coupled effects of ionic strength, iron [...] Read more.
Understanding the dispersivity and migration of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) in porous media is important for exploring their potential for soil and water remediation. In this study, a series of saturated column experiments were conducted to investigate the coupled effects of ionic strength, iron oxides (hematite), and soil colloids on the transport of CNCs through quartz sand and natural soils (red earth and brown earth). Results showed that CNCs had high mobility in oxide-free sand and that iron oxide coating reduced the mobility of CNCs. An analysis of Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek interactions indicated that CNCs exhibited a deep primary minimum, nonexistent maximum repulsion and secondary minimum on hematite-coated sand, favorable for the attachment of CNCs. The maximum effluent percentage of CNCs was 96% in natural soils at 5 mM, but this value decreased to 4% at 50 mM. Soil colloids facilitated the transport of CNCs in brown earth with larger effect at higher ionic strength. The ionic strength effect was larger in natural soils than sand and in red earth than brown earth. The study showed that CNCs can travel 0.2 m to 72 m in porous media, depending on soil properties, solution chemistry, and soil colloids. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanocellulose: Synthesis and Versatile Applications)
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