Special Issue "Metallic Nanostructured Materials for Environmental and Biosensing Application"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanoelectronics, Nanosensors and Devices".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 October 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Laura Rodriguez-Lorenzo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory-INL, Braga, Portugal
Interests: plasmonic nanomaterials; organic–inorganic hybrid composites; surface-enhanced vibrational spectroscopies; surface science; sensing and remediation applications

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

You are cordially invited to submit an original research manuscript to this Special Issue of Nanomaterials entitled “Metallic Nanostructured Materials for Environmental and Biosensing Application”.

This Special Issue aims to highlight the highly interdisciplinary character of the selective environmental and bio-sensing of (bio)molecules (e.g., pollutants, biomarkers), heavy metals, and ions using functionalized metallic nanostructured materials. This major research area involves chemistry, biology, engineering, and material science.

This Special Issue is focused on noble metal nanomaterials, especially gold and silver, which exhibit unique and tunable plasmonic properties as a function of their size, shape, and dielectric layer. This allows us their utilization as sensors based on colorimetric assays, surface-enhanced vibrational spectroscopies (e.g., SEF, SERS, SERRS), and Rayleigh scattering spectroscopies (e.g., dark-field), among others. On the other hand, nanostructured metal oxides such as iron oxide, titanium oxide, and zinc oxide offer high chemical stability, strong adsorption ability, and catalytic and magnetic properties, which are essential properties for sensing applications. Finally, the Special Issue is focused also on the combination of different metallic nanostructures that provide specific properties (e.g., magnetic, electric, plasmonic and mechanicals), which opens the possibility of the enhancement of flexible handling and efficient analytical capabilities of these hybrid nanomaterials.

Dr. Laura Rodriguez-Lorenzo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • plasmonic nanomaterials
  • metal oxides
  • hybrid nanomaterials
  • colorimetric assays
  • SERS
  • heavy metals
  • biomarkers
  • pollutants

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Detection of Silver Nanoparticles in Seawater Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(7), 1711; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11071711 - 29 Jun 2021
Viewed by 673
Abstract
Nanomaterials significantly contribute to the development of new solutions to improve consumer products properties. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are one of the most used, and as human exposure to such NPs increases, there is a growing need for analytical methods to identify and quantify [...] Read more.
Nanomaterials significantly contribute to the development of new solutions to improve consumer products properties. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are one of the most used, and as human exposure to such NPs increases, there is a growing need for analytical methods to identify and quantify nanoparticles present in the environment. Here we designed a detection strategy for AgNPs in seawater using surface-enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS). Three commercial AgNPs coated with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) were used to determine the relative impact of size (PVP-15nmAgNPs and PVP-100nmAgNPs) and aggregation degree (predefined Ag aggregates, PVP-50–80nmAgNPs) on the SERS-based detection method. The study of colloidal stability and dissolution of selected AgNPs into seawater was carried out by dynamic light scattering and UV-vis spectroscopy. We showed that PVP-15nmAgNPs and PVP-100nmAgNPs remained colloidally stable, while PVP-50–80nmAgNPs formed bigger aggregates. We demonstrated that the SERS-based method developed here have the capacity to detect and quantify single and aggregates of AgNPs in seawater. The size had almost no effect on the detection limit (2.15 ± 1.22 mg/L for PVP-15nmAgNPs vs. 1.51 ± 0.71 mg/L for PVP-100nmAgNPs), while aggregation caused an increase of 2.9-fold (6.08 ± 1.21 mg/L). Our results demonstrate the importance of understanding NPs transformation in seawater since this can influence the detection method performance. Full article
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Article
Detection of Sub-Micro- and Nanoplastic Particles on Gold Nanoparticle-Based Substrates through Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) Spectroscopy
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(5), 1149; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11051149 - 28 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 810
Abstract
Small plastic particles such as micro- (<5 mm), sub-micro- (1 µm–100 nm) and nanoplastics (<100 nm) are known to be ubiquitous within our surrounding environment. However, to date relatively few methods exist for the reliable detection of nanoplastic particles in relevant sample matrices [...] Read more.
Small plastic particles such as micro- (<5 mm), sub-micro- (1 µm–100 nm) and nanoplastics (<100 nm) are known to be ubiquitous within our surrounding environment. However, to date relatively few methods exist for the reliable detection of nanoplastic particles in relevant sample matrices such as foods or environmental samples. This lack of relevant data is likely a result of key limitations (e.g., resolution and/or scattering efficiency) for common analytical techniques such as Fourier transform infrared or Raman spectroscopy. This study aims to address this knowledge gap in the field through the creation of surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy substrates utilizing spherical gold nanoparticles with 14 nm and 46 nm diameters to improve the scattering signal obtained during Raman spectroscopy measurements. The substrates are then used to analyze polystyrene particles with sizes of 161 nm or 33 nm and poly(ethylene terephthalate) particles with an average size of 62 nm. Through this technique, plastic particles could be detected at concentrations as low as 10 µg/mL, and analytical enhancement factors of up to 446 were achieved. Full article
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Article
Color Changes in Ag Nanoparticle Aggregates Placed in Various Environments: Their Application to Air Monitoring
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(3), 701; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11030701 - 11 Mar 2021
Viewed by 439
Abstract
Fresh Ag nanoparticles (NPs) dispersed on a transparent SiO2 exhibit an intense optical extinction band originating in localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in the visible range. The intensity of the LSPR band weakened when the Ag NPs was stored in ambient air [...] Read more.
Fresh Ag nanoparticles (NPs) dispersed on a transparent SiO2 exhibit an intense optical extinction band originating in localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) in the visible range. The intensity of the LSPR band weakened when the Ag NPs was stored in ambient air for two weeks. The rate of the weakening and the LSPR wavelength shift, corresponding to visual chromatic changes, strongly depended on the environment in which Ag NPs were set. The origin of a chromatic change was discussed along with both compositional and morphological changes. In one case, bluish coloring followed by a prompt discoloring was observed for Ag NPs placed near the ventilation fan in our laboratory, resulted from adsorption of large amounts of S and Cl on Ag NP surfaces as well as particle coarsening. Such color changes deduce the presence of significant amounts of S and Cl in the environment. In another case, a remarkable blue-shift of the LSPR band was observed for the Ag NPs stored in the desiccator made of stainless steel, originated in the formation of CN and/or HCN compounds and surface roughening. Their color changed from maroon to reddish, suggesting that such molecules were present inside the desiccator. Full article
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