Recent Advances in Antibacterial Nanoengineered Materials

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Synthesis, Interfaces and Nanostructures".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 August 2024 | Viewed by 4954

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Undesired bacterial surface colonization has been an ever-present burden to human societies, leading to food spoilage and poisoning, the biofouling of marine structures, and deadly infections, just to name a few. Despite groundbreaking and disruptive advances in technology over the last several decades, bacteria and their biofilms continue to be a major problem causing patient mortality and losses to the economy. The fast-spreading bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics causes an alarming danger of losing the last defenses against bacteria that are available to our civilization.      

Fortunately, not all hope is lost. Creative efforts from scientists, engineers and medical practitioners have recently brought exciting new technologies that hold significant promise. In particular, nanomaterials and innovative surface nanoengineering approaches provide a path forward. Examples of such technologies include ultrasmall metallic nanostructures made of silver or gold, biomimetic surfaces containing antibacterial nanostructures and liquid metal nanodroplets.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to make an exciting collection of primary research and review articles of the recent progress in the synthesis, fabrication and utilization of nanoscale materials for antibacterial applications. The goal is to include papers related to as many fields concerned with antibacterial technology as possible, including medicine, agriculture, marine fouling, food production and distribution, etc.

Topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Synthesis of antibacterial nanoparticles and nanomaterials;
  • Nanoscale delivery vehicles for antibacterial agents;
  • Nanoscale coatings and surface modification strategies for antibacterial applications;
  • Responsive systems at the nanoscale for the delivery of antibacterial agents;
  • Nanoscale vehicles for the targeted delivery of antibacterial compounds;
  • Mechanistic pathways of nanomaterial antibacterial actions;
  • Methods for the detection of bacterial attachment and biofilm formation involving nanoscale materials.

Prof. Dr. Krasimir Vasilev
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

18 pages, 2092 KiB  
Article
Prolonged Antibacterial Activity in Tannic Acid–Iron Complexed Chitosan Films for Medical Device Applications
by Pascale Chevallier, Helton José Wiggers, Francesco Copes, Cecilia Zorzi Bueno and Diego Mantovani
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(3), 484; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13030484 - 25 Jan 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2196
Abstract
Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) represent a global burden, leading to significant mortality and generating financial costs. One important cause of HAIs is the microbiological contamination of implantable medical devices. In this context, a novel antimicrobial drug-eluting system, based on chitosan and loaded with gentamicin, [...] Read more.
Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) represent a global burden, leading to significant mortality and generating financial costs. One important cause of HAIs is the microbiological contamination of implantable medical devices. In this context, a novel antimicrobial drug-eluting system, based on chitosan and loaded with gentamicin, a broad-spectrum antibiotic, was developed. The effects of the addition of tannic acid and different FeSO4 concentrations on the loaded antibiotic release were evaluated. The properties of the films were assessed in terms of thickness, swelling, mass loss and wettability. The films’ surface composition was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. The antibiotic release in phosphate buffer saline was quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry, and the antibacterial activity was evaluated. Hemolysis and cytotoxicity were also assessed. The results showed that the addition of tannic acid and iron decreased the swelling degree and degradation due to strong interactions between the different components, thus impacting gentamicin release for up to 35 days. In conclusion, this study presents a novel strategy to produce low-cost and biocompatible antimicrobial drug-eluting systems with sustained and prolonged antibacterial activity over more than a month. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Antibacterial Nanoengineered Materials)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

13 pages, 2077 KiB  
Article
Effect of Deposition and Protease Digestion on the Ex Vivo Activity of Antimicrobial Peptide-Coated Contact Lenses
by Parthasarathi Kalaiselvan, Debarun Dutta, Nagaraju V. Konda, Savitri Sharma, Naresh Kumar, Fiona Stapleton and Mark D. P. Willcox
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(2), 349; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13020349 - 14 Jan 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2197
Abstract
A clinical study of antimicrobial contact lenses containing the cationic peptide Mel4 was conducted. The few adverse events that occurred with this lens occurred on or after 13 nights of wear. The current study examined whether the Mel4 contact lenses lost activity during [...] Read more.
A clinical study of antimicrobial contact lenses containing the cationic peptide Mel4 was conducted. The few adverse events that occurred with this lens occurred on or after 13 nights of wear. The current study examined whether the Mel4 contact lenses lost activity during wear and the mechanism of this loss. Participants wore contact lenses for up to 13 nights. Lenses were tested for their ability to reduce the adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. The amount of protein and lipid extracted from lenses was measured. The ability of trypsin to affect the antimicrobial activity of Mel4-coated contact lenses was measured. Mel4-coated contact lenses lost their antimicrobial activity at six nights of wear for both bacteria. The amount of lipids (13 ± 11 vs. 21 ± 14 μg/lens at 13 nights wear) and proteins (8 ± 4 vs. 10 ± 3 mg/lens at 13 nights of wear) extracted from lenses was not different between Mel4-coated and uncoated lenses, and was not different after three nights when antimicrobial activity was maintained and thirteen nights when they had lost activity (lipid: 25 ± 17 vs. 13 ± 11, p = 0.2; protein: 8 ± 1 vs. 8 ± 4 mg/lens, p = 0.4). Trypsin digestion eliminated the antimicrobial activity of Mel4-coated lenses. In summary, Mel4-coated contact lenses lost antibacterial activity at six nights of wear, and the most likely reason was proteolytic digestion of the peptide. Future studies will design and test proteolytically stable peptide mimics as coatings for contact lenses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Antibacterial Nanoengineered Materials)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 1683 KiB  
Article
Activity of Sodium Trimetaphosphate Nanoparticles on Cariogenic-Related Biofilms In Vitro
by Viviane de Oliveira Zequini Amarante, Alberto Carlos Botazzo Delbem, Caio Sampaio, Leonardo Antônio de Morais, Emerson Rodrigues de Camargo, Douglas Roberto Monteiro, Juliano Pelim Pessan and Thayse Yumi Hosida
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(1), 170; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13010170 - 30 Dec 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1284
Abstract
In light of the promising effect of sodium trimetaphosphate nanoparticles (TMPn) on dental enamel, in addition to the scarce evidence of the effects of these nanoparticles on biofilms, this study evaluated the activity of TMPn with/without fluoride (F) on the pH, inorganic composition [...] Read more.
In light of the promising effect of sodium trimetaphosphate nanoparticles (TMPn) on dental enamel, in addition to the scarce evidence of the effects of these nanoparticles on biofilms, this study evaluated the activity of TMPn with/without fluoride (F) on the pH, inorganic composition and extracellular matrix (ECM) components of dual-species biofilms of Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans. The biofilms were cultivated in artificial saliva in microtiter plates and treated with solutions containing 1% or 3% conventional/microparticulate TMP (TMPm) or TMPn, with or without F. After the last treatment, the protein and carbohydrate content of the ECM was analyzed, and the pH and F, calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), and TMP concentrations of the biofilms were determined. In another set of experiments, after the last treatment, the biofilms were exposed to a 20% sucrose solution, and their matrix composition, pH, and inorganic component contents were evaluated. 3% TMPn/F significantly reduced ECM carbohydrate and increased biofilm pH (after sucrose exposure) than other treatments. Also, it significantly increased P and F levels before sucrose exposure in comparison to 3% TMPm/F. In conclusion, 3% TMPn/F affected the biofilm ECM and pH, besides influencing inorganic biofilm composition by increasing P and F levels in the biofilm fluid. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Antibacterial Nanoengineered Materials)
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 3388 KiB  
Article
Lipase-Responsive Amphotericin B Loaded PCL Nanoparticles for Antifungal Therapies
by Evelyn Osehontue Uroro, Richard Bright, Andrew Hayles and Krasimir Vasilev
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(1), 155; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13010155 - 29 Dec 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1883
Abstract
Amphotericin B is an antifungal drug used for the treatment of invasive fungal infections. However, its clinical use is limited due to its serious side effects, such as renal and cardiovascular toxicity. Furthermore, amphotericin B is administered in high doses due to its [...] Read more.
Amphotericin B is an antifungal drug used for the treatment of invasive fungal infections. However, its clinical use is limited due to its serious side effects, such as renal and cardiovascular toxicity. Furthermore, amphotericin B is administered in high doses due to its poor water solubility. Hence, it is necessary to develop an on-demand release strategy for the delivery of amphotericin B to reduce cytotoxicity. The present report describes a novel encapsulation of amphotericin B into lipase-sensitive polycaprolactone to form a nanocomposite. Nanocomposites were produced by the oil-in-water method and their physicochemical properties such as size, hydrodynamic diameter, drug loading, and zeta potential were determined. The in vitro release of amphotericin B was characterized in the presence and absence of lipase. The antifungal activity of the nanocomposites was verified against lipase-secreting Candida albicans, and cytotoxicity was tested against primary human dermal fibroblasts. In the absence of lipase, the release of amphotericin B from the nanocomposites was minimal. However, in the presence of lipase, an enzyme that is abundant at infection sites, a fungicidal concentration of amphotericin B was released from the nanocomposites. The antifungal activity of the nanocomposites showed an enhanced effect against the lipase-secreting fungus, Candida albicans, in comparison to the free drug at the same concentration. Furthermore, nanoencapsulation significantly reduced amphotericin B-related cytotoxicity compared to the free drug. The synthesized nanocomposites can serve as a potent carrier for the responsive delivery of amphotericin B in antifungal applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Antibacterial Nanoengineered Materials)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop