Special Issue "Iron Oxide Nanomaterials"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Inorganic Materials and Metal-Organic Frameworks".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2022 | Viewed by 5071

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Damien Faivre
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Biosciences and Biotechnologies Institute of Aix-Marseille (BIAM), CEA Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance, France
Interests: iron oxides; biomineralization; microswimmers; active matter; nanoparticles

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Iron oxides are widely present in geological and planetary settings. They are also encountered in the biological world, often in the form of nanoparticles formed by microorganisms. Of course, they can also be prepared in the lab to be used in industrial applications or tested for biotechnological ones. In this Special Issue, it is proposed to address the last development in the understanding of the formation and transformation mechanisms of iron oxides, in particular those where the nanoscale plays a major role. Syntheses, characterizations, and applications of iron oxide nanomaterials will also be presented. Finally, in addition to experimental reports, simulation studies will complete the picture, to obtain an integrated view on the subject.

Dr. Damien Faivre
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • iron oxide
  • nanoparticles
  • magnetite
  • maghemite
  • goethite
  • hematite
  • rust
  • medical applications
  • structure
  • thermodynamics
  • magnetic properties
  • optical properties

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Article
Fe3O4-PEI Nanocomposites for Magnetic Harvesting of Chlorella vulgaris, Chlorella ellipsoidea, Microcystis aeruginosa, and Auxenochlorella protothecoides
Nanomaterials 2022, 12(11), 1786; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano12111786 - 24 May 2022
Viewed by 477
Abstract
Magnetic separation of microalgae using magnetite is a promising harvesting method as it is fast, reliable, low cost, energy-efficient, and environmentally friendly. In the present work, magnetic harvesting of three green algae (Chlorella vulgaris, Chlorella ellipsoidea, and Auxenochlorella protothecoides) and one [...] Read more.
Magnetic separation of microalgae using magnetite is a promising harvesting method as it is fast, reliable, low cost, energy-efficient, and environmentally friendly. In the present work, magnetic harvesting of three green algae (Chlorella vulgaris, Chlorella ellipsoidea, and Auxenochlorella protothecoides) and one cyanobacteria (Microcystis aeruginosa) has been studied. The biomass was flushed with clean air using a 0.22 μm filter and fed CO2 for accelerated growth and faster reach of the exponential growth phase. The microalgae were harvested with magnetite nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were prepared by controlled co-precipitation of Fe2+ and Fe3+ cations in ammonia at room temperature. Subsequently, the prepared Fe3O4 nanoparticles were coated with polyethyleneimine (PEI). The prepared materials were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, magnetometry, and zeta potential measurements. The prepared nanomaterials were used for magnetic harvesting of microalgae. The highest harvesting efficiencies were found for PEI-coated Fe3O4. The efficiency was pH-dependent. Higher harvesting efficiencies, up to 99%, were obtained in acidic solutions. The results show that magnetic harvesting can be significantly enhanced by PEI coating, as it increases the positive electrical charge of the nanoparticles. Most importantly, the flocculants can be prepared at room temperature, thereby reducing the production costs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Iron Oxide Nanomaterials)
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Article
Surface Coverage Simulation and 3D Plotting of Main Process Parameters for Molybdenum and Vanadium Adsorption onto Ferrihydrite
Nanomaterials 2022, 12(3), 304; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano12030304 - 18 Jan 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 390
Abstract
Ferrihydrite, FHY, was synthesized and characterized for morphology, mineralogy, surface area, hydrodynamic diameter and surface charge properties before molybdenum (Mo) and vanadium (V) adsorption. The potentiometric titration results showed first direct evidence that CO2 affects FHY surface sites at pH 6–9. Beside [...] Read more.
Ferrihydrite, FHY, was synthesized and characterized for morphology, mineralogy, surface area, hydrodynamic diameter and surface charge properties before molybdenum (Mo) and vanadium (V) adsorption. The potentiometric titration results showed first direct evidence that CO2 affects FHY surface sites at pH 6–9. Beside CO2, particles concentration may affect surface properties with an impact on adsorption performance. Additional new adsorption simulation results on theoretical surface coverage vs. experimental results obtained at varying particles concentration help theoreticians and experimentalists to better estimate and apply anion adsorption processes to real environments and suggest that simulation may not always be entirely reliable. Uptake capacities obtained experimentally, varying pH, particles and metals concentrations, were plotted to assess their synergetic effect and derive trends for future process optimization. Adsorption kinetics and isotherms were also considered. Experimentally derived values for maximum uptake capacities (0.43 and 1.20 mmol g−1, for Mo and V, respectively) and partitioning coefficients have applications, such as in making decisions for anions removal from wastewaters to achieve depollution efficiency or concentration required for effluents discharge and also implications in elements cycling from a geochemical perspective. In this work, the 3D plotting of the main adsorption process parameters obtained experimentally showed inter-correlations between significant process parameters that influence the adsorption process, and provides guidelines for its optimization and indicates that laboratory data can be transposed to real systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Iron Oxide Nanomaterials)
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Article
Strong Crystallographic Influence on Spin Hall Mechanism in PLD-Grown IrO2 Thin Films
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(6), 1478; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11061478 - 02 Jun 2021
Viewed by 1241
Abstract
Spin-to-charge conversion is a central process in the emerging field of spintronics. One of its main applications is the electrical detection of spin currents, and for this, the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) has become one of the preferred methods. We studied the [...] Read more.
Spin-to-charge conversion is a central process in the emerging field of spintronics. One of its main applications is the electrical detection of spin currents, and for this, the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) has become one of the preferred methods. We studied the thickness dependence of the ISHE in iridium oxide (IrO2) thin films, producing spin currents by means of the spin Seebeck effect in γFe2O3/IrO2 bilayers prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The observed ISHE charge current density, which features a maximum as a consequence of the spin diffusion length scale, follows the typical behaviour of spin-Hall-related phenomena. By fitting to the theory developed by Castel et al., we find that the spin Hall angle θSH scales proportionally to the thin film resistivity, θSHρc, and obtains a value for the spin diffusion length λIrO2 of λIrO2=3.3(7) nm. In addition, we observe a negative θSH for every studied thickness and temperature, unlike previously reported works, which brings the possibility of tuning the desired functionality of high-resistance spin-Hall-based devices. We attribute this behaviour to the textured growth of the sample in the context of a highly anisotropic value of the spin Hall conductivity in this material. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Iron Oxide Nanomaterials)
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Article
Fabrication, Microstructure and Colloidal Stability of Humic Acids Loaded Fe3O4/APTES Nanosorbents for Environmental Applications
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(6), 1418; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11061418 - 27 May 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1365
Abstract
Nowadays, numerous researches are being performed to formulate nontoxic multifunctional magnetic materials possessing both high colloidal stability and magnetization, but there is a demand in the prediction of chemical and colloidal stability in water solutions. Herein, a series of silica-coated magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) [...] Read more.
Nowadays, numerous researches are being performed to formulate nontoxic multifunctional magnetic materials possessing both high colloidal stability and magnetization, but there is a demand in the prediction of chemical and colloidal stability in water solutions. Herein, a series of silica-coated magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) has been synthesized via the sol-gel method with and without establishing an inert atmosphere, and then it was tested in terms of humic acids (HA) loading applied as a multifunctional coating agent. The influence of ambient conditions on the microstructure, colloidal stability and HA loading of different silica-coated MNPs has been established. The XRD patterns show that the content of stoichiometric Fe3O4 decreases from 78.8% to 42.4% at inert and ambient atmosphere synthesis, respectively. The most striking observation was the shift of the MNPs isoelectric point from pH ~7 to 3, with an increasing HA reaching up to the reversal of the zeta potential sign as it was covered completely by HA molecules. The zeta potential data of MNPs can be used to predict the loading capacity for HA polyanions. The data help to understand the way for materials’ development with the complexation ability of humic acids and with the insolubility of silica gel to pave the way to develop a novel, efficient and magnetically separable adsorbent for contaminant removal. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Iron Oxide Nanomaterials)
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Review

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Review
Iron Oxide Nanoparticle-Based Hyperthermia as a Treatment Option in Various Gastrointestinal Malignancies
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(11), 3013; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11113013 - 10 Nov 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1002
Abstract
Iron oxide nanoparticle-based hyperthermia is an emerging field in cancer treatment. The hyperthermia is primarily achieved by two differing methods: magnetic fluid hyperthermia and photothermal therapy. In magnetic fluid hyperthermia, the iron oxide nanoparticles are heated by an alternating magnetic field through Brownian [...] Read more.
Iron oxide nanoparticle-based hyperthermia is an emerging field in cancer treatment. The hyperthermia is primarily achieved by two differing methods: magnetic fluid hyperthermia and photothermal therapy. In magnetic fluid hyperthermia, the iron oxide nanoparticles are heated by an alternating magnetic field through Brownian and Néel relaxation. In photothermal therapy, the hyperthermia is mainly generated by absorption of light, thereby converting electromagnetic waves into thermal energy. By use of iron oxide nanoparticles, this effect can be enhanced. Both methods are promising tools in cancer treatment and are, therefore, also explored for gastrointestinal malignancies. Here, we provide an extensive literature research on both therapy options for the most common gastrointestinal malignancies (esophageal, gastric and colorectal cancer, colorectal liver metastases, hepatocellular carcinoma, cholangiocellular carcinoma and pancreatic cancer). As many of these rank in the top ten of cancer-related deaths, novel treatment strategies are urgently needed. This review describes the efforts undertaken in vitro and in vivo. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Iron Oxide Nanomaterials)
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