Special Issue "Nanotechnology in Clothing & Fabrics"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Muralidharan Paramsothy
Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Consultant, NanoWorld Innovations (NWI), 1 Jalan Mawar Singapore 368931
Interests: nanomaterials & nanotechnology; nanoscience for renewable energy; synthesis and applications of nanomaterials; nanoparticle- and/or nanofiber-based materials
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Making clothing and fabric with nanoparticles or nanofibers allows the improvement of fabric properties without a significant increase in weight, thickness, or stiffness. For example, incorporating nano-whiskers into fabric used to make pants produces a lightweight water- and stain-repellent material. Selected companies involved in this fast-developing arena include Nano-Tex, Aspen Aerogel, BASF, and Nano-Horizons.

Some current applications include:

  • Nano-whiskers that cause water to bead up, making the fabric water- and stain-resistant
  • Silver nanoparticles in fabric that kill bacteria, making clothing resistant to odour
  • Nanopores, providing superior insulation for shoe inserts in cold weather
  • Nanoparticles that provide a droplet-repellent effect for fabric used in awnings and other construction structures left out in the weather, causing dirt to rinse off in the rain
  • Nanowires to develop flexible capacitors for use in fabric
  • Coating a fabric with nanoparticles for battery creation
  • Solar cell fabric
  • Honeycomb of polyurethane nanofibers for the creation of clothing that protects against hazardous chemicals
  • Piezoelectric nanofibers that allow clothing to generate electricity through normal motions
  • Form-fitting clothing made using fabric composed of proteins, this nanomaterial stretching as much as 1500% of its original size
  • Electrospun nanofiber inclusion
  • Cell response to nanoparticles

For this Special Issue contributions are solicited in, but not limited to, the above applications.

Dr. Muralidharan Paramsothy
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nanomaterial, Nanostructures
  • Clothing
  • Fabric
  • Textiles
  • Electrospinning
  • Sol–Gel Processing
  • Chemical
  • Physical
  • Biological
  • Energy
  • Multi-Functional
  • Green

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Enhanced Photocatalytic Properties of PET Filaments Coated with Ag-N Co-Doped TiO2 Nanoparticles Sensitized with Disperse Blue Dyes
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(5), 987; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10050987 - 21 May 2020
Abstract
In this study, the effects of disperse blue dye-sensitization on the photocatalytic properties of the Ag-N co-doped TiO2 nanoparticles loaded on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) filaments are investigated under visible light irradiation. The microstructure and photocatalytic properties of the as-synthesized TiO2 nanocomposites, [...] Read more.
In this study, the effects of disperse blue dye-sensitization on the photocatalytic properties of the Ag-N co-doped TiO2 nanoparticles loaded on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) filaments are investigated under visible light irradiation. The microstructure and photocatalytic properties of the as-synthesized TiO2 nanocomposites, as well as the as-prepared PET filaments, are systematically characterized. The photocatalytic performance of the PET filaments coated with the Ag-N co-doped TiO2 nanoparticles sensitized with disperse blue dyes is evaluated via its capacity of photo-degrading methyl orange (MO) dyes under visible light irradiation. It is found that the holes are the predominant reactive radical species and the hydroxyl and superoxide radicals play a subordinate role in the photocatalytic reaction process. The reaction rate constant of the photocatalytic composite filaments is nearly 4.0 times higher than that of the PET filaments loaded solely with TiO2 nanoparticles. The resultant photocatalytic composite filaments are evident to be capable of repeatedly photo-degrading MO dyes without losing its photocatalytic activity significantly. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanotechnology in Clothing & Fabrics)
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Open AccessArticle
Facile Fabrication of Flexible Electrodes and Immobilization of Silver Nanoparticles on Nanoscale Silicate Platelets to Form Highly Conductive Nanohybrid Films for Wearable Electronic Devices
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(1), 65; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10010065 - 27 Dec 2019
Abstract
This study investigated films with remarkably high electrical conductivity after they were easily prepared from organic/inorganic nanohybrid solutions containing an organic polymeric dispersant and two-dimensional nanoscale silicate platelets as the inorganic stabilizer dispersed with silver nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the production [...] Read more.
This study investigated films with remarkably high electrical conductivity after they were easily prepared from organic/inorganic nanohybrid solutions containing an organic polymeric dispersant and two-dimensional nanoscale silicate platelets as the inorganic stabilizer dispersed with silver nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the production of silver nanoparticles synthesized by the in situ chemical reduction of AgNO3 in an aqueous solution by N,N-dimethylformamide results in an average silver nanoparticle diameter of circa 20 nm. Thin films of silver nanoparticles were prepared on a 1-μm-thick film with a low sheet resistance of 8.24 × 10−4 Ω/sq, achieved through the surface migration of silver nanoparticles and prepared by sintering at 300 °C to form an interconnected network. This was achieved with a silver nanoparticle content of 5 wt%, using nanoscale silicate platelets/polyoxyethylene-segmented polyimide/AgNO3 at a weight ratio of 1:10:35. During sintering, the color of the hybrid film changed from gold to milky white, suggesting the migration of silver nanoparticles and the formation of an interconnected network. The results show promise for the fabrication of novel silver-based electrocardiogram electrodes and a flexible wireless electrocardiogram measurement system for wearable electronics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanotechnology in Clothing & Fabrics)
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