E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Advances in Hydrogen Storage Materials Research"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Inorganic Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2019)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Takayuki Ichikawa

Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8527, Japan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: hydrogen storage; inorganic hydrides; ammonia; ammonolysis; electrolysis; magnesium hydride; amide-imide; chemical compressor
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Ankur Jain

Natural Science Centre for Basic Research and Development, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530, Japan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: hydrogen energy; hydrogen storage materials; metal hydrides; complex hydrides; lithium ion battery

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Since the 1970s, hydrogen-absorbing alloys, such as AB5, AB2, AB, and so on, have been in focus as hydrogen storage materials in order to realize high volumetric and gravimetric hydrogen media. These alloys, which have difficulty in achieving high gravimetric density of hydrogen, in principle, are not adopted as tank materials for hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles which have been recently produced. However, inorganic hydrogen storage materials, such as alanate, amide-imide, borohydride, and ammonia borane, which came into use around 2000, and liquid hydrogen storage, such as organic hydrides, annmonia, and formic acid, are being actively researched and developed. Furthermore, it is noteworthy that the development of analytical techniques, such as synchrotron, neutron, TEM, NMR, and XPS, using large facilities, have been especially promoted for research on hydrogen storage materials. This Special Issue is focusing on recent developments towards a higher capacity and higher functionality of such hydrogen storage materials. In addition, we would also pay attention to new analytical methods for materials containing hydrogen. The Guest Editor wishes to receive many interesting and inspiring research papers on these topics.

Prof. Dr. Takayuki Ichikawa
Prof. Dr. Ankur Jain
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Hydrides with High Gravimetric Capacity
  • Hydrides with New Function
  • Hydrogen Storage Alloys
  • Inorganic Hydrides
  • Organic Hydrides
  • Hydrogen Adsorption Materials
  • Composite Materials for Hydrogen Storage
  • Novel Analytical Techniques for Hydrogen Storage Materials
  • Novel Computational Techniques for Hydrogen Storage Materials

Published Papers (6 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-6
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Hydrogen Desorption Properties of LiBH4/xLiAlH4 (x = 0.5, 1, 2) Composites
Molecules 2019, 24(10), 1861; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24101861
Received: 22 March 2019 / Revised: 10 May 2019 / Accepted: 13 May 2019 / Published: 15 May 2019
PDF Full-text (3394 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A detailed analysis of the dehydrogenation mechanism of LiBH4/xLiAlH4 (x = 0.5, 1, 2) composites was performed by thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), mass spectral analysis (MS), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), [...] Read more.
A detailed analysis of the dehydrogenation mechanism of LiBH4/xLiAlH4 (x = 0.5, 1, 2) composites was performed by thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), mass spectral analysis (MS), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), along with kinetic investigations using a Sievert-type apparatus. The results show that the dehydrogenation pathway of LiBH4/xLiAlH4 had a four-step character. The experimental dehydrogenation amount did not reach the theoretical expectations, because the products such as AlB2 and LiAl formed a passivation layer on the surface of Al and the dehydrogenation reactions associated with Al could not be sufficiently carried out. Kinetic investigations discovered a nonlinear relationship between the activation energy (Ea) of dehydrogenation reactions associated with Al and the ratio x, indicating that the Ea was determined both by the concentration of Al produced by the decomposition of LiAlH4 and the amount of free surface of it. Therefore, the amount of effective contact surface of Al is the rate-determining factor for the overall dehydrogenation of the LiBH4/xLiAlH4 composites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Hydrogen Storage Materials Research)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Activation and Disproportionation of Zr2Fe Alloy as Hydrogen Storage Material
Molecules 2019, 24(8), 1542; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24081542
Received: 1 March 2019 / Revised: 11 April 2019 / Accepted: 12 April 2019 / Published: 19 April 2019
PDF Full-text (2068 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
As a hydrogen storage material, Zr2Fe alloy has many advantages such as fast hydrogen absorption speed, high tritium recovery efficiency, strong anti-pulverization ability, and difficulty self-igniting in air. Zr2Fe alloy has lower hydrogen absorption pressure at room temperature than [...] Read more.
As a hydrogen storage material, Zr2Fe alloy has many advantages such as fast hydrogen absorption speed, high tritium recovery efficiency, strong anti-pulverization ability, and difficulty self-igniting in air. Zr2Fe alloy has lower hydrogen absorption pressure at room temperature than LaNi5 alloy. Compared with the ZrVFe alloy, the hydrogen release temperature of Zr2Fe is lower so that the material can recover hydrogen isotopes at lower hydrogen concentration efficiently. Unfortunately, the main problem of Zr2Fe alloy in application is that a disproportionation reaction is easy to occur after hydrogen absorption at high temperature. At present, there is little research on the generation and influencing factors of a disproportionation reaction in Zr2Fe alloy. In this paper, the effects of temperature and hydrogen pressure on the disproportionation of Zr2Fe alloy were studied systematically. The specific activation conditions and experimental parameters for reducing alloy disproportionation are given, which provide a reference for the specific application of Zr2Fe alloy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Hydrogen Storage Materials Research)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Eutectic Phenomenon of LiNH2-KH Composite in MH-NH3 Hydrogen Storage System
Molecules 2019, 24(7), 1348; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24071348
Received: 20 February 2019 / Revised: 28 March 2019 / Accepted: 4 April 2019 / Published: 5 April 2019
PDF Full-text (1126 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Hydrogenation of a lithium-potassium (double-cation) amide (LiK(NH2)2), which is generated as a product by ammonolysis of litium hydride and potassium hydride (LiH-KH) composite, is investigated in details. As a result, lithium amide (LiNH2) and KH are generated [...] Read more.
Hydrogenation of a lithium-potassium (double-cation) amide (LiK(NH2)2), which is generated as a product by ammonolysis of litium hydride and potassium hydride (LiH-KH) composite, is investigated in details. As a result, lithium amide (LiNH2) and KH are generated after hydrogenation at 160 °C as an intermediate. It is noteworthy that the mixture of LiH and KNH2 has a much lower melting point than that of the individual melting points of LiNH2 and KH, which is recognized as a eutectic phenomenon. The hydrogenation temperature of LiNH2 in the mixture is found to be significantly lower than that of LiNH2 itself. This improvement of reactivity must be due to kinetic modification, induced by the enhanced atomic mobility due to the eutectic interaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Hydrogen Storage Materials Research)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Ti-V-C-Based Alloy with a FCC Lattice Structure for Hydrogen Storage
Molecules 2019, 24(3), 552; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24030552
Received: 3 January 2019 / Revised: 24 January 2019 / Accepted: 1 February 2019 / Published: 2 February 2019
PDF Full-text (1630 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Here we report a Ti50V50-10 wt.% C alloy with a unique lattice and microstructure for hydrogen storage development. Different from a traditionally synthesized Ti50V50 alloy prepared by a melting method and having a body-centered cubic (BCC) [...] Read more.
Here we report a Ti50V50-10 wt.% C alloy with a unique lattice and microstructure for hydrogen storage development. Different from a traditionally synthesized Ti50V50 alloy prepared by a melting method and having a body-centered cubic (BCC) structure, this Ti50V50-C alloy synthesized by a mechanical alloying method is with a face-centered cubic (FCC) structure (space group: Fm-3m No. 225). The crystalline size is 60 nm. This alloy may directly absorb hydrogen near room temperature without any activation process. Mechanisms of the good kinetics from lattice and microstructure aspects were discussed. Findings reported here may indicate a new possibility in the development of future hydrogen storage materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Hydrogen Storage Materials Research)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Microstructure Optimization of Mg-Alloys by the ECAP Process Including Numerical Simulation, SPD Treatments, Characterization, and Hydrogen Sorption Properties
Received: 19 November 2018 / Revised: 10 December 2018 / Accepted: 18 December 2018 / Published: 27 December 2018
PDF Full-text (21310 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Both numerical simulation and hardness measurements were used to determine the mechanical and microstructural behavior of AZ31 bulk samples when submitted to the Equal Channel Angular Pressing (ECAP) technique. Billets of this representative of Mg-rich alloys were submitted to different numbers of passes [...] Read more.
Both numerical simulation and hardness measurements were used to determine the mechanical and microstructural behavior of AZ31 bulk samples when submitted to the Equal Channel Angular Pressing (ECAP) technique. Billets of this representative of Mg-rich alloys were submitted to different numbers of passes for various ECAP modes (anisotropic A, isotropic BC). The strain distribution, the grain size refinement, and the micro-hardness were used as indicators to quantify the effectiveness of the different processing routes. Structural characterizations at different scales were achieved using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), micro-analysis, metallography, Small Angle Neutron Scattering SANS, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), and texture determination. The grain and crystallite size distribution and orientation as well as defect impacts were determined. Anelastic Spectroscopy (AS) on mechanically deformed samples have shown that the temperature of ECAP differentiate the fragile to ductile regime. MgH2 consolidated powders were checked for using AS to detect potential hydrogen motions and interaction with host metal atoms. After further optimization, the different mechanically-treated samples were submitted to hydrogenation/dehydrogenation (H/D) cycles, which shows that, for a few passes, the BC mode is better than the A one, as supported by theoretical and experimental microstructure analyses. Accordingly, the hydrogen uptake and (H/D) reactions were correlated with the optimized microstructure peculiarities and interpreted in terms of Johnson-Avrami- Mehl-Kolmogorov (JAMK) and Jander models, successively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Hydrogen Storage Materials Research)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Improvement of Hydrogen Desorption Characteristics of MgH2 With Core-shell [email protected] Composites
Molecules 2018, 23(12), 3113; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules23123113
Received: 15 November 2018 / Revised: 25 November 2018 / Accepted: 26 November 2018 / Published: 28 November 2018
PDF Full-text (2683 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Magnesium hydride (MgH2) has become popular to study in hydrogen storage materials research due to its high theoretical capacity and low cost. However, the high hydrogen desorption temperature and enthalpy as well as the depressed kinetics, have severely blocked its actual [...] Read more.
Magnesium hydride (MgH2) has become popular to study in hydrogen storage materials research due to its high theoretical capacity and low cost. However, the high hydrogen desorption temperature and enthalpy as well as the depressed kinetics, have severely blocked its actual utilizations. Hence, our work introduced [email protected] materials with a core-shell structure to synthesize MgH2-x wt.% [email protected] composites for improving the hydrogen desorption characteristics. The influences of the [email protected] addition on the hydrogen desorption performances and micro-structure of MgH2 have been well investigated. The addition of [email protected] can effectively improve the dehydrogenation kinetics. It is interesting found that: i) the hydrogen desorption kinetics of MgH2 were enhanced with the increased [email protected] additive amount; and ii) the dehydrogenation amount decreased with a rather larger [email protected] additive amount. The additive amount of 4 wt.% [email protected] has been chosen in this study for a balance of kinetics and amount. The MgH2-4 wt.% [email protected] composites release 5.9 wt.% of hydrogen in 5 min and 6.6 wt.% of hydrogen in 20 min. It reflects that the enhanced hydrogen desorption is much faster than the pure MgH2 materials (0.3 wt.% hydrogen in 20 min). More significantly, the activation energy (EA) of the MgH2-4 wt.% [email protected] composites is 112 kJ mol−1, implying excellent dehydrogenation kinetics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Hydrogen Storage Materials Research)
Figures

Figure 1

Molecules EISSN 1420-3049 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top