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Special Issue "Food Packaging Strategies for Enhancing Food Product Shelf Life"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Fragrances and Flavours".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Ana Belén Martín Diana
Website
Guest Editor
INSTITUTO TECNOLÓGICO AGRARIO, Junta de Castilla y León. Consejería de Agricultura y Ganadería
Interests: Dr. Martin-Diana has extensive experience in the extraction and characterization of bioactive compounds from food and waste products, and she has an interest in the valorization of by-products. She has a special interest in the evaluation of bioactivity (antioxidant, antihypertensive, anti-inflammatory, and anti-thrombotic activity) using in vitro analysis. She also has expertise in the development of novel foods through the incorporation of different bio-compounds (peptides and oils) in food matrices (milk and juices) and the evaluation of the functionality, quality, and nutritional aspects. Dr. Martin-Diana has also investigated different novel technologies to extend the shelf life of fresh and processed products with a special interest in non-thermal strategies.

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Consumers expect to purchase high-quality, fresh food. Manufacturers are challenged with determining and maximizing the shelf life of food products that are exposed to varying conditions in the supply chain. Packaging is an important consideration in the shelf life of foods.

Packaging is an external factor that affects shelf life, but is associated with the processing methods used, transportation and storage, and of course consumer handling.

It is important to understand the mode of food deterioration and the sensitivities of the food in order to select the appropriate packaging to maximize the product’s shelf life. However, other factors such as product formulation, processing, and storage conditions also influence a product’s shelf life.

I am glad to invite you to participate in this Special Issue addressing a topic of such great importance in our life. Balancing shelf life, quality, and sustainability is an important challenge. To provide new strategies to extend food products can contribute to reducing food waste and enhancing the quality of the products.

Dr. Ana Belén Martín Diana
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Shelf life
  • Packaging
  • Processing
  • Quality

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effect of Sporulation Conditions Following Submerged Cultivation on the Resistance of Bacillus atrophaeus Spores against Inactivation by H2O2
Molecules 2020, 25(13), 2985; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25132985 - 30 Jun 2020
Abstract
The resistance formation of spores in general and of Bacillus atrophaeus in particular has long been the focus of science in the bio-defense, pharmaceutical and food industries. In the food industry, it is used as a biological indicator (BI) for the evaluation of [...] Read more.
The resistance formation of spores in general and of Bacillus atrophaeus in particular has long been the focus of science in the bio-defense, pharmaceutical and food industries. In the food industry, it is used as a biological indicator (BI) for the evaluation of the inactivation effects of hydrogen peroxide in processing and end packaging lines’ sterilization. Defined BI resistances are critical to avoid false positive and negative tests, which are salient problems due to the variable resistance of currently available commercial BIs. Although spores for use as BIs have been produced for years, little is known about the influence of sporulation conditions on the resistance as a potential source of random variability. This study therefore examines the dependence of spore resistance on the temperature, pH and partial oxygen saturation during submerged production in a bioreactor. For this purpose, spores were produced under different sporulation conditions and their resistance, defined by the D-value, was determined using a count reduction test in tempered 35% liquid hydrogen peroxide. The statistical analysis of the test results shows a quadratic dependence of the resistance on the pH, with the highest D-values at neutral pH. The sporulation temperature has a linear influence on the resistance. The higher the temperature, the higher the D-value. However, these factors interact with each other, which means that the temperature only influences the resistance when the pH is within a certain range. The oxygen partial pressure during sporulation has no significant influence. Based on the data obtained, a model could be developed enabling the resistance of BIs to be calculated, predicted and standardized depending on the sporulation conditions. BI manufacturers could thus produce BIs with defined resistances for the validation of sterilization effects in aseptic packaging/filling lines for the reliable manufacture of shelf-stable and safe food products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Packaging Strategies for Enhancing Food Product Shelf Life)
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Open AccessArticle
High-CO2 Modified Atmosphere Packaging with Superchilling (−1.3 °C) Inhibit Biochemical and Flavor Changes in Turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) during Storage
Molecules 2020, 25(12), 2826; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25122826 - 19 Jun 2020
Abstract
The effects of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) in combination with superchilling (−1.3 °C) on the physicochemical properties, flavor retention, and organoleptic evaluation of turbot samples were investigated during 27 days storage. Results showed that high-CO2 packaging (70% or 60% CO2) [...] Read more.
The effects of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) in combination with superchilling (−1.3 °C) on the physicochemical properties, flavor retention, and organoleptic evaluation of turbot samples were investigated during 27 days storage. Results showed that high-CO2 packaging (70% or 60% CO2) combined with superchilling could reduce the productions of off-flavor compounds, including total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N) and ATP-related compounds. Twenty-four volatile organic compounds were determined by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC/MS) during storage, including eight alcohols, 11 aldehydes, and five ketones. The relative content of off-odor volatiles, such as 1-octen-3-ol, 1-penten-3-ol, (E)-2-octenal, octanal, and 2,3-octanedione, was also reduced by high-CO2 packaging during superchilling storage. Further, 60% CO2/10% O2/30% N2 with superchilling (−1.3 °C) could retard the water migration on the basis of the water holding capacity, low field NMR, and MRI results, and maintain the quality of turbot according to organoleptic evaluation results during storage Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Packaging Strategies for Enhancing Food Product Shelf Life)
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