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Special Issue "Current Issues in Food Microbiology, Safety and Fermentation"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Salam A Ibrahim
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences, North Carolina A&T State University, Greensboro, NC 27411, USA
Interests: Food microbiology, food safety, food fermentation, lactic acid bacteria; probiotics; prebiotics; wine microbiology; organic acid production, malolactic fermentation; Saccharomyces cerevisiae; non-Saccharomyces; alcoholic fermentation; spoilage microbes; fermented beverages; bioconversion process, biofortification; foodborne pathogens; toxins degradation; rapid methods for detection and other related topics.
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The maintenance and improvement of the “Quality and Safety of Food Products” reflects the continuous effort made by businesses, consumers, government, public and private agencies, and scientists. This Special Issue of Molecules provides an opportunity for you to submit original and review papers related to all aspects of food microbiology. In this Special Issue, we would like to report on a variety of current food microbiology topics. These topics include the following: fermentation, lactic acid bacteria, probiotics, organic acid production, food safety, pathogen detection and occurrence in foods; pathogen contamination and limitation in foods; understanding of pathogen adaptation to food matrices and food processing conditions; natural antimicrobial activity and biocontrol in food chains; degradation of microbial metabolites toxic to humans; safety of food fermentation; emerging microbiological risks and food safety; innovative approaches in microbiological risk management in foods; and sustainable solutions to reduce microbial risks in the food chains.

In addition, in this Special Issue, we encourage authors to submit manuscripts in the form of a research paper, review, communication, etc. This issue of Molecules is a wonderful chance for us to share our knowledge, experience and expertise with a broader audience.  Thank you so much for your interest and support.

Prof. Dr. Salam A Ibrahim
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Food microbiology
  • Food safety
  • Food fermentation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Level of Biogenic Amines in Red and White Wines, Dietary Exposure, and Histamine-Mediated Symptoms upon Wine Ingestion
Molecules 2019, 24(19), 3629; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24193629 - 08 Oct 2019
Abstract
Biogenic amines (BAs) are involved in physiological processes. Foods where typically high levels of BAs occur are fermented food and beverage. This work set out to evaluate the occurrence of BAs in red and white wines, and to also ascertain the dietary exposure [...] Read more.
Biogenic amines (BAs) are involved in physiological processes. Foods where typically high levels of BAs occur are fermented food and beverage. This work set out to evaluate the occurrence of BAs in red and white wines, and to also ascertain the dietary exposure to BAs among consumers. Besides, a case report of a probable histamine intoxication upon ingestion of contaminated wine was described. The samples were analyzed through derivatization with dansyl chloride and HPLC-UV detection. Red wines showed higher levels of BAs, especially putrescine (PUT) and histamine (HIS), than white wines (median concentrations of 7.30 and 2.45 mg/L, respectively). However, results of our investigation showed that the dietary exposure to BAs through the consumption of wine (red and white) were lower than the recommended maximum levels for the acute exposure to HIS and tyramine (TYR). In contrast, the levels of BAs in wine on tap were much higher than in bottled wine and close to recommended values. The levels of HIS, TYR, and PUT in tap wine of 9.97, 8.23, and 13.01 mg/L, respectively, were associated with histamine-mediated symptoms in six young individuals after consumption of about three glasses of wine. The overall results and multivariate analysis confirm that red wine shows a higher concentration of BAs than white wine, especially putrescine and histamine. This finding is attributable to the malolactic fermentation that is common for most red wine production. It is also evident that incorrect preservation processes can lead to an increase in BA levels, probably due to the action of bacteria with high decarboxylase activity. The exposure values, although below the toxicity thresholds, could lead to histamine-mediated symptoms in susceptible individuals, also according to the case report discussed in this study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Issues in Food Microbiology, Safety and Fermentation)
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Open AccessArticle
Optimization of Production Parameters for Probiotic Lactobacillus Strains as Feed Additive
Molecules 2019, 24(18), 3286; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24183286 - 09 Sep 2019
Abstract
In animal nutrition, probiotics are considered as desirable alternatives to antibiotic growth promoters. The beneficial effects of probiotics primarily depend on their viability in feed, which demands technical optimization of biomass production, since processing and storage capacities are often strain-specific. In this study, [...] Read more.
In animal nutrition, probiotics are considered as desirable alternatives to antibiotic growth promoters. The beneficial effects of probiotics primarily depend on their viability in feed, which demands technical optimization of biomass production, since processing and storage capacities are often strain-specific. In this study, we optimized the production parameters for two broiler-derived probiotic lactobacilli (L. salivarius and L. agilis). Carbohydrate utilization of both strains was determined and preferred substrates that boosted biomass production in lab-scale fermentations were selected. The strains showed good aerobic tolerance, which resulted in easier scale-up production. For the freeze-drying process, the response surface methodology was applied to optimize the composition of cryoprotective media. A quadratic polynomial model was built to study three protective factors (skim milk, sucrose, and trehalose) and to predict the optimal working conditions for maximum viability. The optimal combination of protectants was 0.14g/mL skim milk/ 0.08 g/mL sucrose/ 0.09 g/mL trehalose (L. salivarius) and 0.15g/mL skim milk/ 0.08 g/mL sucrose/ 0.07 g/mL (L. agilis), respectively. Furthermore, the in-feed stabilities of the probiotic strains were evaluated under different conditions. Our results indicate that the chosen protectants exerted an extensive protection on strains during the storage. Although only storage of the strains at 4 °C retained the maximum stability of both Lactobacillus strains, the employed protectant matrix showed promising results at room temperature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Issues in Food Microbiology, Safety and Fermentation)
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