Special Issue "Application of Electron Microprobe Methods in Trace Element Analysis and Geochronology"

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X). This special issue belongs to the section "Mineral Geochemistry and Geochronology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2018).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Michael J. Jercinovic
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geosciences, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA 01003, USA
Interests: electron microprobe trace element analysis and geochronology; applications in mineralogy and geochemistry of accessory minerals of geochronologic interest; tectonics; space sciences

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The fantastic power of electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) has been widely exploited in the geosciences since the first conceptualization by Raymond Castaing in his 1951 thesis. As it remains the most powerful technique available for non-destructive, micrometer resolution, high accuracy in-situ compositional analysis, EPMA continues to be extensively utilized in the analysis of minerals to evaluate reaction histories and gain insight into the evolution of the Earth and planets. EPMA is also a dynamic, evolving analysis system, with advancements in capabilities continuing to this day. Although trace element applications have been attempted since nearly the inception of EPMA, recent advances in hardware, software, and methodology have enabled an expansion of the frontiers of microanalysis into new realms. For the geosciences, the use of high spatial resolution, high sensitivity trace element analysis is expanding rapidly, including into applications in geochronology. This Special Issue welcomes a broad array of research in the geosciences involving the application of EPMA trace element analysis and geochronology, including techniques, applications, and synergies with other techniques.

The first round submission deadline is: 30 March 2018

Dr. Michael J. Jercinovic
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Minerals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Keywords

  • microanalysis
  • EPMA
  • trace elements
  • geochronology
  • mineral reactions

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Age and Origin of Monazite Symplectite in an Iron Oxide-Apatite Deposit in the Adirondack Mountains, New York, USA: Implications for Tracking Fluid Conditions
Minerals 2019, 9(1), 65; https://doi.org/10.3390/min9010065 - 21 Jan 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Monazite crystals, intergrown with allanite, fluorapatite, and quartz from the Cheever Mine iron oxide-apatite (IOA-type) deposit in Essex County, New York, USA, display rare symplectite textures. Electron probe wavelength-dispersive spectrometry (WDS) mapping and major and trace element characterization of these features reveal a [...] Read more.
Monazite crystals, intergrown with allanite, fluorapatite, and quartz from the Cheever Mine iron oxide-apatite (IOA-type) deposit in Essex County, New York, USA, display rare symplectite textures. Electron probe wavelength-dispersive spectrometry (WDS) mapping and major and trace element characterization of these features reveal a natural experiment in fluid-mediated monazite recrystallization. Two types of monazite with symplectite intergrowths have been recognized (Type I and II). Both types of symplectite development are associated with a decrease in HREE, Si, Ca, Th, and Y, but an increase in both La and Ce in monazite. Electron microprobe Th-U-total Pb analysis of Type I monazite with suitable ThO2 concentrations yielded a weighted mean age of 980 ± 5.8 Ma (MSWD: 3.3), which is interpreted as the age of monazite formation and the onset of symplectite development. Both types of monazite formed during a series of reactions from fluorapatite, and possibly britholite, to produce the final assemblage of monazite, allanite, and fluorapatite. Monazite formation was likely a response to evolving fluid conditions, which favored monazite stability over fluorapatite at ca. 980 Ma, possibly a NaCl brine. A subsequent transition to a Ca-dominated fluid may have then promoted the consumption of monazite to produce another generation of allanite and fluorapatite. Our results indicate that recrystallized monazite formed during fluid-mediated processes that, over time, trended towards an increasingly pure end-member composition. Regionally, these data are consistent with a magmatic-origin followed by fluid-mediated remobilization of select phases at subsolidus conditions for the Adirondack IOA deposits. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Dating Metasomatism: Monazite and Zircon Growth during Amphibolite Facies Albitization
Minerals 2018, 8(5), 187; https://doi.org/10.3390/min8050187 - 29 Apr 2018
Cited by 3
Abstract
We present coupled textural observations and trace element and geochronological data from metasomatic monazite and zircon, to constrain the timing of high-grade Na-metasomatism (albitization) of an Archean orthogneiss in southwest Montana, USA. Field, mineral textures, and geochemical evidence indicate albitization occurred as a [...] Read more.
We present coupled textural observations and trace element and geochronological data from metasomatic monazite and zircon, to constrain the timing of high-grade Na-metasomatism (albitization) of an Archean orthogneiss in southwest Montana, USA. Field, mineral textures, and geochemical evidence indicate albitization occurred as a rind along the margin of a ~3.2 Ga granodioritic orthogneiss (Pl + Hbl + Kfs + Qz + Bt + Zrn) exposed in the Northern Madison range. The metasomatic product is a weakly deformed albitite (Ab + Bt + OAm + Zrn + Mnz + Ap + Rt). Orthoamphibole and biotite grew synkinematically with the regional foliation fabric, which developed during metamorphism that locally peaked at upper amphibolite-facies during the 1800–1710 Ma Big Sky orogeny. Metasomatism resulted in an increase in Na, a decrease in Ca, K, Ba, Fe, and Sr, a complete transformation of plagioclase and K-feldspar into albite, and loss of quartz. In situ geochronology on zoned monazite and zircon indicate growth by dissolution–precipitation in both phases at ~1750–1735 Ma. Trace element geochemistry of rim domains in these phases are best explained by dissolution–reprecipitation in equilibrium with Na-rich fluid. Together, these data temporally and mechanistically link metasomatism with high-grade tectonism and prograde metamorphism during the Big Sky orogeny. Full article
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