Special Issue "Sulfide Geochemistry"

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X). This special issue belongs to the section "Mineral Geochemistry and Geochronology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 June 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Cora C. Wohlgemuth-Ueberwasser

Helmholtz Centre Potsdam, GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, 14473 Potsdam, Germany
Website | E-Mail
Interests: sulfide geochemistry; trace metals; alteration; solid solution; nano particles; equilibrium; disequilibrium

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sulfides, as a major host to a variety of elements of economic interest, form in diverse geological environments. Their formation conditions are strongly dependent on external parameters, such as availablity of elements, temperature, pressure, sulfur saturation, and oxygen fugacity, among others. The geochemistry of sulfides is, in many cases, restricted to phase stabilities. Investigations of phase diagrams, as well as change in phase stabilities with changing intrinsic parameters, serve as base for our knowledge of sulfide deposit formation. Minor element incorporation is equally controlled by external as well as internal parameters, latter being, e.g., crystal parameters, defect sites, the incorporation of micro- or nanoinclusions, or coupled substitution of specific elements. Future exploration for metals for the world’s demand rely on a thorough knowledge of sulfide geochemistry. This Special Issue aims to publish research on topics related to different aspects of sulfide geochemistry such as modeling, experimental studies and analytical approaches.

Dr. Cora C. Wohlgemuth-Ueberwasser
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Minerals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • sulfide geochemistry
  • phase equilibria
  • phase transition
  • trace elements
  • alteration
  • nano inclusions

Published Papers (3 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-3
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
In Situ Chalcophile and Siderophile Element Behavior in Sulfides from Moroccan Middle Atlas Spinel Peridotite Xenoliths during Metasomatism and Weathering
Minerals 2019, 9(5), 276; https://doi.org/10.3390/min9050276
Received: 1 April 2019 / Revised: 29 April 2019 / Accepted: 30 April 2019 / Published: 4 May 2019
PDF Full-text (3051 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
In situ chalcophile and siderophile major and trace elements were analyzed in sulfides from eight Moroccan Middle Atlas lherzolite xenoliths using electron microprobe and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The sulfides occur enclosed in primary silicates, interstitial in the peridotite matrix, [...] Read more.
In situ chalcophile and siderophile major and trace elements were analyzed in sulfides from eight Moroccan Middle Atlas lherzolite xenoliths using electron microprobe and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The sulfides occur enclosed in primary silicates, interstitial in the peridotite matrix, and associated with glass-bearing melt pockets. Monosulfide solid solutions are enriched in these xenoliths relative to pentlandite and intermediate solid solutions. Regardless of the textural occurrence, sulfide platinum-group element (PGE) patterns are distinguished into residual ([Pd/Ir]N < 1 and [Pt/Pd]N > 1 or [Pt/Pd]N < 1), melt-like ([Pd/Ir]N > 1), and unfractionated patterns. The coexistence of both residual and melt-like PGE signatures on a cm scale in a single sample implies that sulfides may record initial depletion and subsequent re-enrichment more effectively than constituent silicates do. Chalcophile and siderophile trace elements other than the PGEs are fractionated between the precipitated sulfide phases, but do not vary systematically with the PGE signatures, suggesting that the PGEs are comparatively sensitive to melting and depletion. In addition, Fe-rich hydroxides generated by sulfide breakdown due to atmospheric weathering display PGE systematics almost identical to their precursor sulfides, implying that they may be reliable tracers of mantle processes even after extensive weathering. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sulfide Geochemistry)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Geological, Mineralogical and Textural Impacts on the Distribution of Environmentally Toxic Trace Elements in Seafloor Massive Sulfide Occurrences
Minerals 2019, 9(3), 162; https://doi.org/10.3390/min9030162
Received: 2 January 2019 / Revised: 26 February 2019 / Accepted: 27 February 2019 / Published: 7 March 2019
PDF Full-text (39764 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
With mining of seafloor massive sulfides (SMS) coming closer to reality, it is vital that we have a good understanding of the geochemistry of these occurrences and the potential toxicity impact associated with mining them. In this study, SMS samples from seven hydrothermal [...] Read more.
With mining of seafloor massive sulfides (SMS) coming closer to reality, it is vital that we have a good understanding of the geochemistry of these occurrences and the potential toxicity impact associated with mining them. In this study, SMS samples from seven hydrothermal fields from various tectonic settings were investigated by in-situ microanalysis (electron microprobe (EMPA) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS)) to highlight the distribution of potentially-toxic trace elements (Cu, Zn, Pb, Mn, Cd, As, Sb, Co, Ni, Bi, Ag and Hg) within the deposits, their minerals and textures. We demonstrate that a combination of mineralogy, trace element composition and texture characterisation of SMS from various geotectonic settings, when considered along with our current knowledge of oxidation rates and galvanic coupling, can be used to predict potential toxicity of deposit types and individual samples and highlight which may be of environmental concern. Although we cannot quantify toxicity, we observe that arc-related sulfide deposits have a high potential toxicity when compared with deposits from other tectonic settings based on their genetic association of a wide range of potentially toxic metals (As, Sb, Pb, Hg, Ag and Bi) that are incorporated into more reactive sulfosalts, galena and Fe-rich sphalerite. Thus, deposits such as these require special care when considered as mining targets. In contrast, the exclusive concern of ultra-mafic deposits is Cu, present in abundant, albeit less reactive chalcopyrite, but largely barren of other metals such as As, Pb, Sb, Cd and Hg. Whilst geological setting does dictate metal endowment, ultimately mineralogy is the largest control of trace element distribution and subsequent potential toxicity. Deposits containing abundant pyrrhotite (high-temperature deposits) and Fe-rich sphalerite (ubiquitous to all SMS deposits) as well as deposits with abundant colloform textures also pose a higher risk. This type of study can be combined with “bulk lethal toxicity” assessments and used throughout the stages of a mining project to help guide prospecting and legislation, focus exploitation and minimise environmental impact. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sulfide Geochemistry)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Trace Element Contents in Sphalerite from the Nayongzhi Zn-Pb Deposit, Northwestern Guizhou, China: Insights into Incorporation Mechanisms, Metallogenic Temperature and Ore Genesis
Minerals 2018, 8(11), 490; https://doi.org/10.3390/min8110490
Received: 3 September 2018 / Revised: 21 October 2018 / Accepted: 22 October 2018 / Published: 26 October 2018
PDF Full-text (7135 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The Nayongzhi Zn-Pb deposit, located in the southeastern margin of the Sichuan-Yunnan-Guizhou (S-Y-G) Zn-Pb metallogenic province, China, has been recently discovered in this region and has an estimated resource of 1.52 Mt of metal at average grades of 4.82 wt % Zn and [...] Read more.
The Nayongzhi Zn-Pb deposit, located in the southeastern margin of the Sichuan-Yunnan-Guizhou (S-Y-G) Zn-Pb metallogenic province, China, has been recently discovered in this region and has an estimated resource of 1.52 Mt of metal at average grades of 4.82 wt % Zn and 0.57 wt % Pb. The ore bodies are hosted in the Lower Cambrian Qingxudong Formation dolostone and occur as stratiform, stratoid and steeply dipping veins. The predominant minerals are sphalerite, galena, dolomite, calcite with minor pyrite, and barite. In this paper, the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) technique has been used to investigate the concentrations of Fe, Cd, Ge, Ga, Cu, Pb, Ag, In, Sn, Sb, Co and Mn in bulk grain sphalerite from the Nayongzhi deposit, in an effort to provide significant insights into the element substitution mechanisms, ore-forming temperature and genesis of the deposit. This study shows that those trace elements (i.e., Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Fe, Mn, Cu, Ga, Ge, Ag, and Co) are present in the form of isomorphism in sphalerite, and strong binary correlation among some elements suggests direct substitution as Zn2+↔Fe2+ and coupled substitutions as Zn2+↔Ga3+ + (Cu, Ag)+ and Zn2+↔In3+ + Sn3+ + □ (vacancy), despite there being no clear evidence for the presence of Sn3+. Sphalerite from the Nayongzhi deposit is enriched in Cd, Ge and Ga and depleted in Fe, Mn, In and Co, which is similar to that of the Mississippi Valley-type (MVT) deposit and significantly different from that of the Volcanogenic Massive Sulfide (VMS) deposit, Sedimentary-exhalative (Sedex) deposit, skarn, and epithermal hydrothermal deposit. Moreover, the ore-forming temperature is relatively low, ranging from 100.5 to 164.4 °C, as calculated by the GGIMFis geothermometer. Geological characteristics, mineralogy and trace element contents of sphalerite suggest that the Nayongzhi deposit is a MVT deposit. In addition, according to the geological characteristics, Ag content in sphalerite, and Pb isotope evidence, the Nayongzhi deposit is distinct from the deposits associated with the Indosinian Orogeny in S-Y-G Zn-Pb metallogenic province (e.g., Huize, Daliangzi, Tianbaoshan and Tianqiao deposits), thus, suggesting that multi-stage Zn-Pb mineralization may have occurred in this region. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sulfide Geochemistry)
Figures

Figure 1

Minerals EISSN 2075-163X Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top