Special Issue "Crystallization in Solid Solution-Aqueous Solution Systems"

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X). This special issue belongs to the section "Crystallography and Physical Chemistry of Minerals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. José Manuel Astilleros

Departamento de Mineralogía y Petrología, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: crystal growth at low temperatures; mineral–water interface geochemistry; dissolution-precipitation reactions; sorption of heavy metals by mineral surfaces; epitaxy of minerals; carbonates; sulphates

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Natural crystallization in aqueous systems involves in most cases the incorporation of foreign ions into the growing mineral, resulting in the formation of solid phases with substitutional impurities in their structures, i.e., solid solutions. On the Earth’s surface, subsurface and aquatic environments the formation of solid solutions from multicomponent aqueous solutions is one of the most ubiquitous phenomena. Understanding the parameters that control crystallization in solid solution-aqueous solution systems is key to be able of deriving from solid solutions reliable information about natural paleoenvironments and paleoclimates, understanding global element cycling as well as developing efficient treatments for the remediation of the contamination of soils and waters based in the formation of solid solutions. This Special Issue will focus on different aspects of the crystallization in solid solution-aqueous solution systems, including both, primary crystallization and dissolution-recrystallization processes. We welcome manuscripts dealing with recent advances on environmental remediation by crystallization of solid solution, the relationship between isomorphic substitutions and polymorph selection and polymorph stability crossovers, crystal growth mechanisms and kinetics, crystal habit variation, ion partitioning at equilibrium and at far from equilibrium conditions, solid solutions in biomineralization, and, in general, any topic that involves the formation of solid solutions from multicomponent aqueous solutions.

Prof. Dr. José Manuel Astilleros
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Minerals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • solid solution-aqueous solution systems
  • crystallization
  • dissolution-recrystallization processes
  • ion sorption
  • ion partitioning
  • polymorphism
  • biomineralization
  • global element cycle

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Precipitation of CaCO3 Polymorphs from Aqueous Solutions: The Role of pH and Sulphate Groups
Minerals 2019, 9(3), 178; https://doi.org/10.3390/min9030178
Received: 15 February 2019 / Revised: 6 March 2019 / Accepted: 10 March 2019 / Published: 13 March 2019
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Abstract
In this work, we aimed to experimentally study the nucleation and growth of CaCO3 phases precipitated from supersaturated aqueous solutions in the presence of varying concentrations of sulphate oxyanion. The experiments were conducted under pH conditions close to neutral (7.6) and by [...] Read more.
In this work, we aimed to experimentally study the nucleation and growth of CaCO3 phases precipitated from supersaturated aqueous solutions in the presence of varying concentrations of sulphate oxyanion. The experiments were conducted under pH conditions close to neutral (7.6) and by considering a wide range of initial (SO42−)/(CO32−) ratios (0 to approx. 68) in the aqueous solution. We paid special attention to the evolution of the precipitates during ageing within a time framework of 14 days. The mineralogy, morphology, and composition of the precipitates were studied by X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and EDX microanalysis. The concentration of sulphate ions in the reacted aqueous solution was studied by ICPs. The experimental results showed that the mineral composition of the precipitate recovered in each run varied with the (SO42−)/(CO32−) ratio in the parental solution, which influenced the mineral evolution of the precipitates during ageing. We observed that high concentrations of sulphate in the aqueous solution stabilized the vaterite precipitates and inhibited calcite formation. Furthermore, aragonite never precipitated directly from the solution, and it was only formed via a dissolution-precipitation process in solutions with a high (SO42−)/(CO32−) ratio after long reaction times. Finally, gypsum only precipitated after long ageing in those aqueous solutions with the highest concentration of sulphate. The reaction pathways during ageing, the morphology of the calcite crystals, and the composition of vaterite and calcite were discussed considering both kinetic and thermodynamic factors. These results showed a considerably more complex behavior of the system than that observed in experiments conducted under higher pHs and supersaturation levels and lower (SO42−)/(CO32−) ratios in the aqueous phase. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Crystallization in Solid Solution-Aqueous Solution Systems)
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Open AccessArticle
The Effect of Ionic Strength and Sraq upon the Uptake of Ra during the Recrystallization of Barite
Minerals 2018, 8(11), 502; https://doi.org/10.3390/min8110502
Received: 21 September 2018 / Revised: 19 October 2018 / Accepted: 29 October 2018 / Published: 2 November 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (6732 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Recrystallization and solid-solution formation with barite is considered as relevant retention mechanism for 226Ra in long-term scenarios of nuclear waste management. Here, we studied the effect of ionic strength and the presence of Sr in solution upon the Ra-uptake kinetics and final [...] Read more.
Recrystallization and solid-solution formation with barite is considered as relevant retention mechanism for 226Ra in long-term scenarios of nuclear waste management. Here, we studied the effect of ionic strength and the presence of Sr in solution upon the Ra-uptake kinetics and final Ra concentrations in solution by recrystallizing barite in solution with varying Sr and NaCl concentration and temperature for up to 1000 days. Final Ra-concentrations were interpreted based on thermodynamic modelling. Our results indicate a slight decrease of the retention potential of barite for Ra but little effect on the uptake kinetics due to the increase of ionic strength from. 0.1 mol/kg to 1.0 mol/kg of NaCl. The final concentrations at solid/liquid ratio of 0.5 g/kg are well described based on available thermodynamic models whereas at 5 g/kg additional Ra uptake probably due to kinetic effects was observed. On the contrary, the presence of Sr in solution can have a significant inhibiting kinetic effect on the uptake kinetics and lower the final Ra-uptake. In some cases, with low solid/liquid ratio or at ambient conditions, Sr completely inhibits barite recrystallization. In all other cases, Ra, Ba and Sr were taken up as thermodynamically predicted at the end of the experiments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Crystallization in Solid Solution-Aqueous Solution Systems)
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