Special Issue "Phase Relations, Redox and Melting Reactions in Carbonate-bearing Systems in the Earth's Mantle"

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X). This special issue belongs to the section "Mineral Geochemistry and Geochronology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 8 November 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Anton Shatskiy

Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk, Russia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: experimental mineralogy and petrology; high-pressure experiment; phase relations; single crystal growth; diffusion; chemical kinetics; in situ X-ray diffraction; Raman spectroscopy; multianvil technique
Guest Editor
Prof. Konstantin D. Litasov

Sobolev Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk, Russia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: experimental mineralogy and petrology; high-pressure experiment; phase relations; single crystal growth; diffusion; chemical kinetics; in situ X-ray diffraction; Raman spectroscopy; multianvil technique

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The study of carbonates under various P-T-X-fO2 conditions provides insights into both the deep carbon cycle and the transport of atmospheric CO2 to the Earth’s mantle. Carbonates are one of the important classes of minerals lowering the solidus temperatures of mantle rocks, which, in turn, influences the generation of deeply seated magmas. Carbonates may have a substantial role in mantle processes relevant to partial melting, metasomatism, and diamond formation. Recent findings of alkali and alkaline earth carbonates in mantle minerals and xenoliths including superdeep diamonds call for further study of the carbonate-bearing systems in a wider range of compositions, pressures and redox conditions. Accordingly, we invite researchers to contribute to this Special Issue on "Phase Relations, Redox and Melting Reactions in Carbonated Systems in the Earth's Mantle".

The potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Subsolidus and melting phase relations in carbonate and carbonate-bearing systems under high pressures
  • Crystal chemistry and thermodynamics of simple and double carbonates versus pressure and temperature
  • Redox reactions involving reduction of carbonates under mantle P-T conditions
  • Compositions, structure and physical properties of carbonate-bearing melts in the Earth’s mantle
  • Mantle-derived carbonate-bearing inclusions in minerals from kimberlites and UHPM rocks
  • Origin of deep-seated carbonate magmas and possible mechanisms of their transport in the Earth's mantle

Prof. Anton Shatskiy
Prof. Konstantin D. Litasov
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Minerals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • carbonates
  • carbonate melts
  • high-pressure experiment
  • phase relations
  • melting reactions
  • redox reactions
  • reaction kinetics
  • Raman spectroscopy
  • X-ray diffraction
  • Earth’s mantle

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The System K2CO3–CaCO3–MgCO3 at 3 GPa: Implications for Carbonatite Melt Compositions in the Shallow Continental Lithosphere
Minerals 2019, 9(5), 296; https://doi.org/10.3390/min9050296
Received: 26 April 2019 / Revised: 13 May 2019 / Accepted: 14 May 2019 / Published: 15 May 2019
PDF Full-text (6149 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Potassic dolomitic melts are believed to be responsible for the metasomatic alteration of the shallow continental lithosphere. However, the temperature stability and range of compositions of these melts are poorly understood. In this regard, we performed experiments on phase relationships in the system [...] Read more.
Potassic dolomitic melts are believed to be responsible for the metasomatic alteration of the shallow continental lithosphere. However, the temperature stability and range of compositions of these melts are poorly understood. In this regard, we performed experiments on phase relationships in the system K2CO3–CaCO3–MgCO3 at 3 GPa and at 750–1100 °C. At 750 and 800 °C, the system has five intermediate compounds: Dolomite, Ca0.8Mg0.2CO3 Ca-dolomite, K2(Ca≥0.84Mg≤0.16)2(CO3)3, K2(Ca≥0.70Mg≤0.30)(CO3)2 bütschliite, and K2(Mg≥0.78Ca≤0.22)(CO3)2. At 850 °C, an additional intermediate compound, K2(Ca≥0.96Mg≤0.04)3CO3)4, appears. The K2Mg(CO3)2 compound disappears near 900 °C via incongruent melting, to produce magnesite and a liquid. K2Ca(CO3)2 bütschliite melts incongruently at 1000 °C to produce K2Ca2(CO3)3 and a liquid. K2Ca2(CO3)3 and K2Ca3(CO3)4 remain stable in the whole studied temperature range. The liquidus projection of the studied ternary system is divided into nine regions representing equilibrium between the liquid and one of the primary solid phases, including magnesite, dolomite, Ca-dolomite, calcite-dolomite solid solutions, K2Ca3(CO3)4, K2Ca2(CO3)3, K2Ca(CO3)2 bütschliite, K2Mg(CO3)2, and K2CO3 solid solutions containing up to 24 mol % CaCO3 and less than 2 mol % MgCO3. The system has six ternary peritectic reaction points and one minimum on the liquidus at 825 ± 25 °C and 53K2CO3∙47Ca0.4Mg0.6CO3. The minimum point resembles a eutectic controlled by a four-phase reaction, by which, on cooling, the liquid transforms into three solid phases: K2(Mg0.78Ca0.22)(CO3)2, K2(Ca0.70Mg0.30)(CO3)2 bütschliite, and a K1.70Ca0.23Mg0.07CO3 solid solution. Since, at 3 GPa, the system has a single eutectic, there is no thermal barrier for liquid fractionation from alkali-poor toward K-rich dolomitic compositions, more alkaline than bütschliite. Based on the present results we suggest that the K–Ca–Mg carbonate melt containing ~45 mol % K2CO3 with a ratio Ca/(Ca + Mg) = 0.3–0.4 is thermodynamically stable at thermal conditions of the continental lithosphere (~850 °C), and at a depth of 100 km. Full article
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