Clays, Zeolites and Engineered Mineral Materials for Wastewater Treatment

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Mineralogy and Biogeochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 1396

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Inorganic Technology, Faculty of Chemistry and Technology, University of Split, Ruđera Boškovića 35, 21000 Split, Croatia
Interests: geopolymerization and mechanisms of geopolymerization of aluminosilicate systems; kinetics and equilibrium of heavy metal sorption from wastewater on sorbents of organic and/or inorganic origin

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Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Chemistry and Technology, University of Split, Ruđera Boškovića 35, 21000 Split, Croatia
Interests: zeolites; solubility kinetic modeling; adsorption; mesoporous materials; kinetics; surface adsorption; reaction kinetics; chemical engineering; environmental engineering

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The environment that surrounds us is becoming, daily, more and more burdened by the emission of harmful substances due to rapid industrialization and globalization. These harmful substances are primarily heavy metals that reach the environment through discharge in wastewaters. Most of them are highly soluble in water and show toxic and carcinogenic impact on all living beings, and it is therefore very important to reduce or, where it is possible, entirely remove heavy metals from contaminated wastewater prior to its discharge into the environment. Sorption is  one of the most selected treatment options. It represents a highly effective physicochemical process for removing heavy metals from wastewater, especially at low initial metal concentrations, using various sorbents. This Special Issue aims to provide a venue to present new findings on the possible application of clays, zeolites, and engineered mineral materials for wastewater treatment, with the focus on heavy metal removal. The hope is that this Special Issue will contribute to a better understanding of the sorption process, as well as possible materials that could be used as effective sorbent materials.

Dr. Mario Nikola Mužek
Prof. Dr. Sandra Svilović
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Minerals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • clays
  • zeolites
  • engineered mineral materials
  • sorption
  • heavy metals
  • wastewater treatment

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

20 pages, 51780 KiB  
Article
Treatment of Waters Having Different Ionic Composition and pH with Natural Zeolites from Bulgaria
by Mariana Yossifova, Dimitrina Dimitrova, Elena Tacheva, Ivanina Sergeeva and Rositsa Ivanova
Minerals 2024, 14(3), 245; https://doi.org/10.3390/min14030245 - 27 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1087
Abstract
The migration of 32 elements from natural zeolitized tuffs from the Beli Plast and Golobradovo deposits (Bulgaria) was determined in ultrapure, tap, mineral, and coal mine waters in order to evaluate their desorption and adsorption properties. The tuffs are Ca-K-Na and contain clinoptilolite [...] Read more.
The migration of 32 elements from natural zeolitized tuffs from the Beli Plast and Golobradovo deposits (Bulgaria) was determined in ultrapure, tap, mineral, and coal mine waters in order to evaluate their desorption and adsorption properties. The tuffs are Ca-K-Na and contain clinoptilolite (90 and 78wt.%, respectively), plagioclase, sanidine, opal-CT, mica, quartz, montmorillonite, goethite, calcite, ankerite, apatite, and monazite. The desorption properties are best revealed during the treatment of ultrapure, tap, and mineral water, whereas the adsorption properties are best manifested in coal mine water treatment. The concentrations of Al, Si, Fe, Na, Mn, F, K, Pb, and U increase in the treated ultrapure, tap, and mineral water, while the content of K, Be, Pb, and F increase in the treated mine water. The tuffs show selective partial or complete adsorption of Na, Mg, Sr, Li, Be, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Al, Pb, U, and SO42−. They demonstrate the ability to neutralize acidic and alkaline pH. Sources of F are presumed to be clinoptilolite and montmorillonite. The usage of zeolitized tuffs for at-home drinking water treatment has to be performed with caution due to the migration of potentially toxic and toxic elements. Full article
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