Microbial Community Response to Climate and Environmental Changes

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2021) | Viewed by 14533

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF), 15374 Müncheberg, Germany
Interests: plant–microbe interactions; soil and plant microbiome; microbial diversity; extremophiles; PGPR; rhizosphere
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Guest Editor
Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology, and Biotechnology, Yerevan State University, Yerevan, Armenia
Interests: microbial community; extremophiles

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Guest Editor
Department of Biological Sciences, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway
Interests: microbial diversity; microbial ecology; metabolites; enzymes
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Climate change results an increase in temperature, a decrease in precipitation that potentially causes drought conditions. It also affects on the ecosystem that results in loss of the biodiversity in the area. The information of biodiversity and microbial biogenic element cycling of such ecosystems would help understand global change, threats, and opportunities posed by these habitats' lives. Moreover, their interactions with their surrounding biomes would help understand their ecology and functions within this extreme environment. Microbial communities play an important role in the cycling of carbon and nutrients in various ecosystems, including cropping systems, and biotic and abiotic factors regulate their activities.  However, the abundance and composition of microbial communities during environmental perturbation and their interactions with other organisms are still in the nascent stage. Several untapped mechanisms need to be explored and unleashed. With the amalgamation of prominent molecular approaches, future insights in this area can open numerous gateways towards multifaceted arrays of finely evolved microbial communities' interactions with their host. The Special Issue invites research articles and reviews in the areas mentioned above, which should be largely focused on unraveling the microbial communities and their interactions within various ecosystems under climate change. The topics also cover these exceptional microorganisms' role in mitigating the biotic and abiotic stresses faced by plants.

Dr. Dilfuza Egamberdieva
Dr. Hovik Panosyan
Prof. Dr. Nils-Kåre Birkeland
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • microbial communities
  • diversity
  • abiotic and biotic stresses
  • soil and plant microbiome
  • extremophiles

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 2908 KiB  
Article
Variation in Sodic Soil Bacterial Communities Associated with Different Alkali Vegetation Types
by Andrea K. Borsodi, Márton Mucsi, Gergely Krett, Attila Szabó, Tamás Felföldi and Tibor Szili-Kovács
Microorganisms 2021, 9(8), 1673; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9081673 - 06 Aug 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2035
Abstract
In this study, we examined the effect of salinity and alkalinity on the metabolic potential and taxonomic composition of microbiota inhabiting the sodic soils in different plant communities. The soil samples were collected in the Pannonian steppe (Hungary, Central Europe) under extreme dry [...] Read more.
In this study, we examined the effect of salinity and alkalinity on the metabolic potential and taxonomic composition of microbiota inhabiting the sodic soils in different plant communities. The soil samples were collected in the Pannonian steppe (Hungary, Central Europe) under extreme dry and wet weather conditions. The metabolic profiles of microorganisms were analyzed using the MicroResp method, the bacterial diversity was assessed by cultivation and next-generation amplicon sequencing based on the 16S rRNA gene. Catabolic profiles of microbial communities varied primarily according to the alkali vegetation types. Most members of the strain collection were identified as plant associated and halophilic/alkaliphilic species of Micrococcus, Nesterenkonia, Nocardiopsis, Streptomyces (Actinobacteria) and Bacillus, Paenibacillus (Firmicutes) genera. Based on the pyrosequencing data, the relative abundance of the phyla Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Acidobacteria, Gemmatimonadetes and Bacteroidetes also changed mainly with the sample types, indicating distinctions within the compositions of bacterial communities according to the sodic soil alkalinity-salinity gradient. The effect of weather extremes was the most pronounced in the relative abundance of the phyla Actinobacteria and Acidobacteria. The type of alkali vegetation caused greater shifts in both the diversity and activity of sodic soil microbial communities than the extreme aridity and moisture. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbial Community Response to Climate and Environmental Changes)
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16 pages, 2401 KiB  
Article
Habitats Are More Important Than Seasons in Shaping Soil Bacterial Communities on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau
by Rui Wang, Miao Wang, Jing Wang and Yinghua Lin
Microorganisms 2021, 9(8), 1595; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9081595 - 27 Jul 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2095
Abstract
Both habitats and seasons can determine the dynamics of microbial communities, but the relative importance of different habitats and seasonal changes in shaping the soil bacterial community structures on a small spatial scale in permafrost areas remains controversial. In this study, we explored [...] Read more.
Both habitats and seasons can determine the dynamics of microbial communities, but the relative importance of different habitats and seasonal changes in shaping the soil bacterial community structures on a small spatial scale in permafrost areas remains controversial. In this study, we explored the relative effect of four typical alpine meadow habitats (swamp wetland, swamp meadow, meadow and mature meadow) versus seasons on soil bacterial communities based on samples from the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau in four months (March, May, July and September). The results showed that habitats, rather than seasons explained more variation of soil bacterial composition and structure. Environmental cofactors explained the greatest proportion of bacterial variation observed and can help elucidate the driving force of seasonal changes and habitats on bacterial communities. Soil temperature played the most important role in shaping bacterial beta diversities, followed by soil total nitrogen and pH. A group of microbial biomarkers, used as indicators of different months, were identified using random forest modeling, and for which relative abundance was shaped by different environmental factors. Furthermore, seasonality in bacterial co-occurrence patterns was observed. The data showed that co-occurrence relationships changed over months. The inter-taxa connections in May and July were more pronounced than that in March and September. Bryobacter, a genus of subgroup_22 affiliated to Acidobacteria, and Pseudonocardia belonging to Actinobacteria were observed as the keystone taxa in different months in the network. These results demonstrate that the bacterial community was clustered according to the seasonal mechanism, whereas the co-occurrence relationships changed over months, which indicated complex bacterial dynamics in a permafrost grassland on the eastern edge of Qinghai-Tibetan. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbial Community Response to Climate and Environmental Changes)
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16 pages, 2928 KiB  
Article
Ocean Acidification Induces Changes in Virus–Host Relationships in Mediterranean Benthic Ecosystems
by Michael Tangherlini, Cinzia Corinaldesi, Francesca Ape, Silvestro Greco, Teresa Romeo, Franco Andaloro and Roberto Danovaro
Microorganisms 2021, 9(4), 769; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9040769 - 06 Apr 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2404
Abstract
Acidified marine systems represent “natural laboratories”, which provide opportunities to investigate the impacts of ocean acidification on different living components, including microbes. Here, we compared the benthic microbial response in four naturally acidified sites within the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea characterized by different acidification [...] Read more.
Acidified marine systems represent “natural laboratories”, which provide opportunities to investigate the impacts of ocean acidification on different living components, including microbes. Here, we compared the benthic microbial response in four naturally acidified sites within the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea characterized by different acidification sources (i.e., CO2 emissions at Ischia, mixed gases at Panarea and Basiluzzo and acidified freshwater from karst rocks at Presidiana) and pH values. We investigated prokaryotic abundance, activity and biodiversity, viral abundance and prokaryotic infections, along with the biochemical composition of the sediment organic matter. We found that, despite differences in local environmental dynamics, viral life strategies change in acidified conditions from mainly lytic to temperate lifestyles (e.g., chronic infection), also resulting in a lowered impact on prokaryotic communities, which shift towards (chemo)autotrophic assemblages, with lower organic matter consumption. Taken together, these results suggest that ocean acidification exerts a deep control on microbial benthic assemblages, with important feedbacks on ecosystem functioning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbial Community Response to Climate and Environmental Changes)
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16 pages, 4324 KiB  
Article
Aquatic Bacterial Diversity, Community Composition and Assembly in the Semi-Arid Inner Mongolia Plateau: Combined Effects of Salinity and Nutrient Levels
by Xiangming Tang, Guijuan Xie, Keqiang Shao, Wei Tian, Guang Gao and Boqiang Qin
Microorganisms 2021, 9(2), 208; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9020208 - 20 Jan 2021
Cited by 33 | Viewed by 2738
Abstract
Due to the recent decades of climate change and intensive human activities, endorheic lakes are threatened by both salinization and eutrophication. However, knowledge of the aquatic bacterial community’s response to simultaneous increasing salinity and trophic status is still poor. To address this knowledge [...] Read more.
Due to the recent decades of climate change and intensive human activities, endorheic lakes are threatened by both salinization and eutrophication. However, knowledge of the aquatic bacterial community’s response to simultaneous increasing salinity and trophic status is still poor. To address this knowledge gap, we collected 40 surface water samples from five lakes and six rivers on the semi-arid Inner Mongolia Plateau, and investigated their bacterial communities using 16S rRNA gene-targeted amplicon sequencing. We found that bacterial species diversity significantly decreased from the mesotrophic freshwater river habitat to the eutrophic high-brackish lake habitat; salinity was more important than trophic status in explaining this decreased diversity. Salinity was the most important environmental factor in shaping community composition, while increased nitrogen loading was more important in structuring predicted functional composition. Within the lake habitats, the impact of environmental filtering on bacterial community assembly increased with the increasing salinity. The results suggested that the elevated salinity and nutrients have combined effects on the aquatic bacterial community, resulting in dramatic declines in species diversity, and promoted the importance of deterministic processes in community assembly. Our findings provide new insights into bacterial communities’ responses to the intensified climate-driven and anthropogenic environmental changes in aquatic ecosystems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbial Community Response to Climate and Environmental Changes)
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18 pages, 3233 KiB  
Article
Phosphorus Reduces Negative Effects of Nitrogen Addition on Soil Microbial Communities and Functions
by Zongwei Xia, Jingyi Yang, Changpeng Sang, Xu Wang, Lifei Sun, Ping Jiang, Chao Wang and Edith Bai
Microorganisms 2020, 8(11), 1828; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8111828 - 20 Nov 2020
Cited by 32 | Viewed by 4005
Abstract
Increased soil nitrogen (N) from atmospheric N deposition could change microbial communities and functions. However, the underlying mechanisms and whether soil phosphorus (P) status are responsible for these changes still have not been well explained. Here, we investigated the effects of N and [...] Read more.
Increased soil nitrogen (N) from atmospheric N deposition could change microbial communities and functions. However, the underlying mechanisms and whether soil phosphorus (P) status are responsible for these changes still have not been well explained. Here, we investigated the effects of N and P additions on soil bacterial and fungal communities and predicted their functional compositions in a temperate forest. We found that N addition significantly decreased soil bacterial diversity in the organic (O) horizon, but tended to increase bacterial diversity in the mineral (A) horizon soil. P addition alone did not significantly change soil bacterial diversity but mitigated the negative effect of N addition on bacterial diversity in the O horizon. Neither N addition nor P addition significantly influenced soil fungal diversity. Changes in soil microbial community composition under N and P additions were mainly due to the shifts in soil pH and NO3 contents. N addition can affect bacterial functional potentials, such as ureolysis, N fixation, respiration, decomposition of organic matter processes, and fungal guilds, such as pathogen, saprotroph, and mycorrhizal fungi, by which more C probably was lost in O horizon soil under increased N deposition. However, P addition can alleviate or switch the effects of increased N deposition on the microbial functional potentials in O horizon soil and may even be a benefit for more C sequestration in A horizon soil. Our results highlight the different responses of microorganisms to N and P additions between O and A horizons and provides an important insight for predicting the changes in forest C storage status under increasing N deposition in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbial Community Response to Climate and Environmental Changes)
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