Endophytes for Managing Biotic and Abiotic Stress in Plants 2.0

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Microbe Interactions".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 5686

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF), Müncheberg, Germany
Interests: plant microbe interactions; soil and plant microbiome; microbial diversity; biological control; biofertilizers; biofungicides; plant nutrition; medicinal plant
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Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Biocontrol, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Plant Resources and Southern Marine Science and Engineering Guangdong Laboratory (Zhuhai), School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275, China
Interests: microbiology in extreme environments; environmental microbiology; microbial ecology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is the continuation of our previous Special Issue, "Endophytes for Managing Biotic and Abiotic Stress in Plants".

Endophytes are microorganisms that symbiotically reside in plant tissues, either inter- or intra-cellularly, maintaining a mutualistic association. These unique microorganisms influence several vital activities of host plants by playing key roles as proficient plant-growth promoters, inducing systemic resistance against pathogen attack, and helping to counteract abiotic stresses such as salinity, drought, extreme temperature, and metal toxicity. Molecular mechanisms governing endophyte-mediated stress responses include the modification of host genetic machinery through cascades of actions or directly by the secretion of metabolites. This is carried out through the elicitation of stress-related genes or the induction of the synthesis of biomolecules which in turn trigger plant defense pathways resulting in tolerance to environmental stresses. Endophytes could represent an eco-friendly approach to improving the growth and yield of crops in a sustainable manner. They could also be used for climate-resilient cropping systems, which are needed in the era of climate change. Endophytes are now also known to be a source of novel metabolites, and can be exploited in areas like bioremediation, biodegradation, pharmaceuticals, and more. However, studies of plant–endophyte interactions are still in their nascent stage, and there are several untapped mechanisms which need to be explored and unleashed. With the amalgamation of prominent biotechnological approaches, future insights in this area could open numerous paths towards multifaceted arrays of finely evolved plant–microbe interactions. This Special Issue invites research articles and reviews in the abovementioned areas, which should be largely focused on unraveling the plant–endophyte interactions, the mechanisms involved, and the role of these exceptional microorganisms in mitigating biotic and abiotic stresses.

Dr. Egamberdieva Dilfuza
Prof. Dr. Wen-Jun Li
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 2320 KiB  
Article
Role of Bacillus spp. Plant Growth Promoting Properties in Mitigating Biotic and Abiotic Stresses in Lowland Rice (Oryza sativa L.)
by Tanja Weinand, Abbas El-Hasan and Folkard Asch
Microorganisms 2023, 11(9), 2327; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms11092327 - 15 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 981
Abstract
The ability of microorganisms to promote plant growth and mitigate abiotic and biotic stresses makes them an interesting tool for sustainable agriculture. Numerous studies aim to identify new, promising bacteria isolates. Traditional culture-based methods, which focus on selecting microorganisms with plant-growth-promoting traits, such [...] Read more.
The ability of microorganisms to promote plant growth and mitigate abiotic and biotic stresses makes them an interesting tool for sustainable agriculture. Numerous studies aim to identify new, promising bacteria isolates. Traditional culture-based methods, which focus on selecting microorganisms with plant-growth-promoting traits, such as hormone production, nutrient solubilization, and antifungal properties, are widely used. This study aims to investigate the role of plant-growth-promoting properties in bacteria-mediated stress mitigation and the suitability of traditional culture-based methods as a screening tool for the identification of beneficial bacteria. To this end, we tested three endophytic Bacillus isolates, which have previously been shown to affect tolerance against iron toxicity in lowland rice, (a) for their effect on the resistance against brown spot disease, and (b) for plant-growth-promoting traits using common culture-based methods. Both B. pumilus isolates inhibited fungal growth in vitro and reduced brown spot disease in two of three rice cultivars in planta, although they tested negative for all plant-growth-promoting traits. While B. megaterium was negative for ACC deaminase activity and nutrient solubilization, it exhibited auxin production. Nevertheless, B. megaterium did not suppress brown spot disease in any of the three rice cultivars. This study shows that bacteria do not necessarily have to possess classical plant-growth-promoting properties in order to be beneficial to plants, and it emphasizes the limitation of common culture-based methods in effectively identifying beneficial bacteria. Moreover, our results highlight the significance of the interaction between bacteria and plant cultivars in determining the beneficial effects of Bacillus spp. on plants under biotic or abiotic stresses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Endophytes for Managing Biotic and Abiotic Stress in Plants 2.0)
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15 pages, 4318 KiB  
Article
Fungal Community Composition at the Last Remaining Wild Site of Yellow Early Marsh Orchid (Dactylorhiza incarnata ssp. ochroleuca)
by Andrea Dove, Michael D. Charters, Matthew J. Campbell, Hanna Blake, Manoj Menon and Viswambharan Sarasan
Microorganisms 2023, 11(8), 2124; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms11082124 - 21 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1019
Abstract
The yellow early marsh orchid (Dactylorhiza incarnata ssp. ochroleuca) is a critically endangered terrestrial orchid in Britain. Previous attempts to translocate symbiotic seedlings to a site near the last remaining wild site demonstrated some success, with a 10% survival rate despite [...] Read more.
The yellow early marsh orchid (Dactylorhiza incarnata ssp. ochroleuca) is a critically endangered terrestrial orchid in Britain. Previous attempts to translocate symbiotic seedlings to a site near the last remaining wild site demonstrated some success, with a 10% survival rate despite adverse weather conditions over a two-year period. However, to facilitate future reintroduction efforts or conservation translocations, a more comprehensive understanding of the fungal microbiome and abiotic soil characteristics at the final remaining wild site is required. Obtaining comprehensive information on both the fungal community and soil nutrient composition from wild sites has significant benefits and may prove critical for the success of future conservation translocations involving threatened orchids. This preliminary study, conducted at the last remaining wild site, revealed a significant correlation between the relative abundance of the orchid mycorrhizal fungal order Cantharellales and the concentrations of nitrate and phosphate in the soil. Another orchid mycorrhizal fungal group, Sebacinales, was found to be distributed extensively throughout the site. The composition of fungal communities across the entire site, orchid-hosting and non-orchid-hosting soils is discussed in relation to reinforcing the current population and preventing the extinction of this orchid. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Endophytes for Managing Biotic and Abiotic Stress in Plants 2.0)
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18 pages, 3240 KiB  
Article
Mineral-Solubilizing Bacteria-Mediated Enzymatic Regulation and Nutrient Acquisition Benefit Cotton’s (Gossypium hirsutum L.) Vegetative and Reproductive Growth
by Iqra Ahmad, Maqshoof Ahmad, Bushra, Azhar Hussain, Muhammad Zahid Mumtaz, Najm-ul-Seher, Ghulam Hassan Abbasi, Farheen Nazli, Lisa Pataczek and Hayssam M. Ali
Microorganisms 2023, 11(4), 861; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms11040861 - 28 Mar 2023
Viewed by 1473
Abstract
Many farmers’ incomes in developing countries depend on the cultivation of major crops grown in arid and semi-arid regions. The agricultural productivity of arid and semi-arid areas primarily relies on chemical fertilizers. The effectiveness of chemical fertilizers needs to improve by integration with [...] Read more.
Many farmers’ incomes in developing countries depend on the cultivation of major crops grown in arid and semi-arid regions. The agricultural productivity of arid and semi-arid areas primarily relies on chemical fertilizers. The effectiveness of chemical fertilizers needs to improve by integration with other sources of nutrients. Plant growth-promoting bacteria can solubilize nutrients, increase plant nutrient uptake, and supplement chemical fertilizers. A pot experiment evaluated the promising plant growth-promoting bacterial strain’s effectiveness in promoting cotton growth, antioxidant enzymes, yield, and nutrient uptake. Two phosphate solubilizing bacterial strains (Bacillus subtilis IA6 and Paenibacillus polymyxa IA7) and two zinc solubilizing bacterial strains (Bacillus sp. IA7 and Bacillus aryabhattai IA20) were coated on cotton seeds in a single as well as co-inoculation treatments. These treatments were compared with uninoculated controls in the presence and absence of recommended chemical fertilizer doses. The results showed the co-inoculation combination of Paenibacillus polymyxa IA7 and Bacillus aryabhattai IA20 significantly increased the number of bolls, seed cotton yield, lint yield, and antioxidants activities, including superoxide dismutase, guaiacol peroxidase, catalase, and peroxidase. Co-inoculation combination of Bacillus subtilis IA6 and Bacillus sp. IA16 promoted growth attributes, including shoot length, root length, shoot fresh weight, and root fresh weight. This co-inoculation combination also increased soil nutrient content. At the same time, Paenibacillus polymyxa IA7 + Bacillus aryabhattai IA20 increased nutrient uptake by plant shoots and roots compared. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Endophytes for Managing Biotic and Abiotic Stress in Plants 2.0)
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