Special Issue "Gut Microorganisms of Aquatic Animals"

A special issue of Microorganisms (ISSN 2076-2607). This special issue belongs to the section "Gut Microbiota".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2019)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Konstantinos Ar. Kormas

Department of Ichthyology & Aquatic Environment Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, University of Thessaly, Greece
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +30-242-109-3082
Interests: ecology of aquatic prokaryotes and unicellular eukaryotes; animal–microbe associations in the aquatic environment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The last decade has seen rapid and spectacular ongoing progress in the multiple roles of gut microorganisms in humans. This knowledge and its concomitant technological progress is attracting increasing scientific interest for the investigation of animal gut microbiota and microbiomes. For various reasons, aquatic animals are no exception; such reasons are related to the eco-evolutionary history, the economic significance and ecological vulnerability of these animals and their habitats, in marine and fresh waters. The Special Issue entitled “Gut Microorganisms of Aquatic Animals” aims to present recent research on any aspect of aquatic animal gut microbiology. Some of its focal points include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Gut microbes of animals living in extreme aquatic environments
  • Aquatic animal ontogeny and microbial succession
  • Gut microbiology of farmed aquatic animals
  • Gut Archaea and microscopic eukaryotes of aquatic animals
  • Novel methodologies for investigating gut microbes of aquatic animals
  • Pollution and other environmental stress factors on gut microbes of aquatic animals
  • Insights into the hologenome theory of evolution of aquatic animals

Prof. Dr. Konstantinos Kormas
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • gut
  • microorganism
  • prokaryote
  • eukaryote
  • aquatic
  • animal
  • marine
  • freshwater
  • Bacteria
  • Archaea
  • microbiota
  • microbiome

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Impact of Aquaculture Practices on Intestinal Bacterial Profiles of Pacific Whiteleg Shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei
Microorganisms 2019, 7(4), 93; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms7040093
Received: 19 February 2019 / Revised: 26 March 2019 / Accepted: 28 March 2019 / Published: 30 March 2019
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Abstract
Considering the crucial role of the gut microbiome in animal health and nutrition, solutions to shrimp aquaculture challenges, such as improving disease resistance and optimizing growth on lower cost feeds, may lie in manipulation of their microbial symbionts. However, achieving this goal will [...] Read more.
Considering the crucial role of the gut microbiome in animal health and nutrition, solutions to shrimp aquaculture challenges, such as improving disease resistance and optimizing growth on lower cost feeds, may lie in manipulation of their microbial symbionts. However, achieving this goal will require a deeper understanding of shrimp microbial communities and how their composition is influenced by diet formulation, environmental conditions, and host factors. In this context, the current study investigated the intestinal bacterial communities of the Pacific whiteleg shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei—the most widely aquaculture-farmed shrimp worldwide) reared in indoor aquaculture facilities and outdoor pond systems. While samples showed very consistent intestinal bacterial community profiles within each production system, major differences were uncovered between the two practices. Indeed, bacteria affiliated with Rhodobacteraceae (Proteobacteria) and Actinobacteria were significantly more abundant in indoor samples (84.4% vs. 5.1%; 3.0% vs. 0.06%, respectively), while Vibrionaceae (Proteobacteria), Firmicutes, Fusobacteria and Cyanobacteria were predominant in pond samples (0.03% vs. 44.8%; 0.7% vs. 36.0%; 0.0% vs. 7.9%; 0.001% vs. 1.6%, respectively). Accordingly, the abundance of 11 of the 12 most prominent Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) were found to be statistically different between the two production environments. Together, these results indicate that aquaculture practices greatly influence the intestinal bacterial profile of the whiteleg shrimp, and further suggest that bacterial communities of this economically important crustacean could be effectively manipulated using diet composition or environmental conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gut Microorganisms of Aquatic Animals)
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Open AccessArticle Gut Bacterial Communities in Geographically Distant Populations of Farmed Sea Bream (Sparus aurata) and Sea Bass (Dicentrarchus labrax)
Microorganisms 2018, 6(3), 92; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms6030092
Received: 18 July 2018 / Revised: 28 August 2018 / Accepted: 31 August 2018 / Published: 1 September 2018
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Abstract
This study investigated the profile of the autochthonous gut bacterial communities in adult individuals of Sparus aurata and Dicentrarchus labrax reared in sea cages in five distantly located aquaculture farms in Greece and determine the impact of geographic location on them in order [...] Read more.
This study investigated the profile of the autochthonous gut bacterial communities in adult individuals of Sparus aurata and Dicentrarchus labrax reared in sea cages in five distantly located aquaculture farms in Greece and determine the impact of geographic location on them in order to detect the core gut microbiota of these commercially important fish species. Data analyses resulted in no significant geographic impact in the gut microbial communities within the two host species, while strong similarities between them were also present. Our survey revealed the existence of a core gut microbiota within and between the two host species independent of diet and geographic location consisting of the Delftia, Pseudomonas, Pelomonas, Propionibacterium, and Atopostipes genera. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gut Microorganisms of Aquatic Animals)
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Open AccessCommunication Microbial Community and Potential Pathogen Shifts Along an Ornamental Fish Supply Chain
Microorganisms 2018, 6(3), 91; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms6030091
Received: 21 July 2018 / Revised: 14 August 2018 / Accepted: 16 August 2018 / Published: 25 August 2018
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Abstract
There is broad interest in disease spread through the pet trade, but empirical research on hosts and pathogens in transit along actual trade routes is notably absent. Using next-generation DNA sequencing, and partnering with the ornamental fish industry, we tracked shifts in microbial [...] Read more.
There is broad interest in disease spread through the pet trade, but empirical research on hosts and pathogens in transit along actual trade routes is notably absent. Using next-generation DNA sequencing, and partnering with the ornamental fish industry, we tracked shifts in microbial community and potential pathogen structure associated with Sailfin Tang (Zebrasoma desjardinii) along the United States (U.S.) leg of an international supply chain. We observed striking changes in microbial diversity and composition of potential pathogens, including increased dominance of vibrios of fishes in transit. Our pilot findings suggest that high investment in fishes early in the supply chain may not matter to their long-term health depending on end destination conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gut Microorganisms of Aquatic Animals)
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Open AccessArticle Exploring the Impact of the Biofloc Rearing System and an Oral WSSV Challenge on the Intestinal Bacteriome of Litopenaeus vannamei
Microorganisms 2018, 6(3), 83; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms6030083
Received: 4 July 2018 / Revised: 3 August 2018 / Accepted: 4 August 2018 / Published: 8 August 2018
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (1879 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
We provide a global overview of the intestinal bacteriome of Litopenaeus vannamei in two rearing systems and after an oral challenge by the White spot syndrome virus (WSSV). By using a high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing technology, we identified and compared the composition [...] Read more.
We provide a global overview of the intestinal bacteriome of Litopenaeus vannamei in two rearing systems and after an oral challenge by the White spot syndrome virus (WSSV). By using a high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing technology, we identified and compared the composition and abundance of bacterial communities from the midgut of shrimp reared in the super-intensive biofloc technology (BFT) and clear seawater system (CWS). The predominant bacterial group belonged to the phylum Proteobacteria, followed by the phyla Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria, and Firmicutes. Within Proteobacteria, the family Vibrionaceae, which includes opportunistic shrimp pathogens, was more abundant in CWS than in BFT-reared shrimp. Whereas the families Rhodobacteraceae and Enterobacteriaceae accounted for almost 20% of the bacterial communities of shrimp cultured in BFT, they corresponded to less than 3% in CWS-reared animals. Interestingly, the WSSV challenge dramatically changed the bacterial communities in terms of composition and abundance in comparison to its related unchallenged group. Proteobacteria remained the dominant phylum. Vibrionaceae was the most affected in BFT-reared shrimp (from 11.35 to 20.80%). By contrast, in CWS-reared animals the abundance of this family decreased from 68.23 to 23.38%. Our results provide new evidence on the influence of both abiotic and biotic factors on the gut bacteriome of aquatic species of commercial interest. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gut Microorganisms of Aquatic Animals)
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