Special Issue "Cell-Based Microarrays"

A special issue of Microarrays (ISSN 2076-3905).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2016).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Holger Erfle
Website
Guest Editor
BioQuant, Heidelberg University, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany
Interests: HCS; HTS; automation; cellular assays; gene perturbation and observation; data mining; miniaturization; automated correlative light microscopy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In 2001, Ziauddin and Sabatini introduced the first cell-based microarray as a microarray-driven gene expression system. In the original set-up, different cDNA vectors were printed on a glass support. After, cells were grown over the whole surface, thus resulting in a cellular response in the printed locations. Subsequent publications have matched the technique to diverse applications involving RNAi and compounds. The potential of this method for performing gene function analysis and for identifying novel therapeutic targets and agents has now been clearly shown. Thus, cell-based microarrays have become an appreciated tool in basic research and drug discovery.

The advancement of miniaturized cell-based microarrays offers a multitude of advantages that are out of reach for conventional macroscale cell screening methods, which use microtiter plates. Amongst other advantages, the small dimensions of typical cell-based microarrays greatly reduce consumables, cell and drug consumption; this advantage is particularly important for rare cell analysis and cost reductions.

In this Special Issue, we invite material regarding new developments, technological advancements, and applications involving cell-based microarrays. Information about the new developments associated with data analysis and data mining is also critical in the area of cell-based microarrays.

Dr. Holger Erfle
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Microarrays is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cell-based microarrays
  • reverse transfection
  • screening
  • gene perturbation
  • data analysis
  • cell types
  • cellular assays

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Droplet Microarray Based on Superhydrophobic-Superhydrophilic Patterns for Single Cell Analysis
Microarrays 2016, 5(4), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/microarrays5040028 - 09 Dec 2016
Cited by 15
Abstract
Single-cell analysis provides fundamental information on individual cell response to different environmental cues and is a growing interest in cancer and stem cell research. However, current existing methods are still facing challenges in performing such analysis in a high-throughput manner whilst being cost-effective. [...] Read more.
Single-cell analysis provides fundamental information on individual cell response to different environmental cues and is a growing interest in cancer and stem cell research. However, current existing methods are still facing challenges in performing such analysis in a high-throughput manner whilst being cost-effective. Here we established the Droplet Microarray (DMA) as a miniaturized screening platform for high-throughput single-cell analysis. Using the method of limited dilution and varying cell density and seeding time, we optimized the distribution of single cells on the DMA. We established culturing conditions for single cells in individual droplets on DMA obtaining the survival of nearly 100% of single cells and doubling time of single cells comparable with that of cells cultured in bulk cell population using conventional methods. Our results demonstrate that the DMA is a suitable platform for single-cell analysis, which carries a number of advantages compared with existing technologies allowing for treatment, staining and spot-to-spot analysis of single cells over time using conventional analysis methods such as microscopy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cell-Based Microarrays)
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Open AccessArticle
A Combinatorial Protein Microarray for Probing Materials Interaction with Pancreatic Islet Cell Populations
Microarrays 2016, 5(3), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/microarrays5030021 - 10 Aug 2016
Cited by 4
Abstract
Pancreatic islet transplantation has become a recognized therapy for insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. During isolation from pancreatic tissue, the islet microenvironment is disrupted. The extracellular matrix (ECM) within this space not only provides structural support, but also actively signals to regulate islet survival and [...] Read more.
Pancreatic islet transplantation has become a recognized therapy for insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. During isolation from pancreatic tissue, the islet microenvironment is disrupted. The extracellular matrix (ECM) within this space not only provides structural support, but also actively signals to regulate islet survival and function. In addition, the ECM is responsible for growth factor presentation and sequestration. By designing biomaterials that recapture elements of the native islet environment, losses in islet function and number can potentially be reduced. Cell microarrays are a high throughput screening tool able to recreate a multitude of cellular niches on a single chip. Here, we present a screening methodology for identifying components that might promote islet survival. Automated fluorescence microscopy is used to rapidly identify islet derived cell interaction with ECM proteins and immobilized growth factors printed on arrays. MIN6 mouse insulinoma cells, mouse islets and, finally, human islets are progressively screened. We demonstrate the capability of the platform to identify ECM and growth factor protein candidates that support islet viability and function and reveal synergies in cell response. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cell-Based Microarrays)
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Open AccessArticle
Time-Resolved Study of Nanoparticle Induced Apoptosis Using Microfabricated Single Cell Arrays
Microarrays 2016, 5(2), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/microarrays5020008 - 15 Apr 2016
Cited by 6
Abstract
Cell fate decisions like apoptosis are heterogeneously implemented within a cell population and, consequently, the population response is recognized as sum of many individual dynamic events. Here, we report on the use of micro-patterned single-cell arrays for real-time tracking of nanoparticle-induced (NP) cell [...] Read more.
Cell fate decisions like apoptosis are heterogeneously implemented within a cell population and, consequently, the population response is recognized as sum of many individual dynamic events. Here, we report on the use of micro-patterned single-cell arrays for real-time tracking of nanoparticle-induced (NP) cell death in sets of thousands of cells in parallel. Annexin (pSIVA) and propidium iodide (PI), two fluorescent indicators of apoptosis, are simultaneously monitored after exposure to functionalized polystyrene (PS NH 2) nanobeads as a model system. We find that the distribution of Annexin onset times shifts to later times and broadens as a function of decreasing NP dose. We discuss the mean time-to-death as a function of dose, and show how the EC 50 value depends both on dose and time of measurement. In addition, the correlations between the early and late apoptotic markers indicate a systematic shift from apoptotic towards necrotic cell death during the course of the experiment. Thus, our work demonstrates the potential of array-based single cell cytometry for kinetic analysis of signaling cascades in a high-throughput format. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cell-Based Microarrays)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Living Cell Microarrays: An Overview of Concepts
Microarrays 2016, 5(2), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/microarrays5020011 - 26 May 2016
Cited by 11
Abstract
Living cell microarrays are a highly efficient cellular screening system. Due to the low number of cells required per spot, cell microarrays enable the use of primary and stem cells and provide resolution close to the single-cell level. Apart from a variety of [...] Read more.
Living cell microarrays are a highly efficient cellular screening system. Due to the low number of cells required per spot, cell microarrays enable the use of primary and stem cells and provide resolution close to the single-cell level. Apart from a variety of conventional static designs, microfluidic microarray systems have also been established. An alternative format is a microarray consisting of three-dimensional cell constructs ranging from cell spheroids to cells encapsulated in hydrogel. These systems provide an in vivo-like microenvironment and are preferably used for the investigation of cellular physiology, cytotoxicity, and drug screening. Thus, many different high-tech microarray platforms are currently available. Disadvantages of many systems include their high cost, the requirement of specialized equipment for their manufacture, and the poor comparability of results between different platforms. In this article, we provide an overview of static, microfluidic, and 3D cell microarrays. In addition, we describe a simple method for the printing of living cell microarrays on modified microscope glass slides using standard DNA microarray equipment available in most laboratories. Applications in research and diagnostics are discussed, e.g., the selective and sensitive detection of biomarkers. Finally, we highlight current limitations and the future prospects of living cell microarrays. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cell-Based Microarrays)
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