Special Issue "Metabolomics and Chronic Obstructive Lung Diseases"

A special issue of Metabolites (ISSN 2218-1989).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Assoc. Prof. Jessica Lasky-Su

Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Genetic epidemiology; asthma; GWAS genetics; metabolomics, COPD

Dr. Lasky-Su is an Associate Professor in Medicine and associate statistician at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Over the last 19 years, she has focused on the analysis of genetics, genomics, and metabolomics data of various complex diseases with a primary focus on asthma over the last 15 years. The accumulation of these efforts has resulted in a productive track record of over 120 original research articles. Her ongoing R01 proposals, “The Integrative Metabolomics of Asthma Severity” (PI, R01HL123915), "Mechanistic insights into asthma pathogenesis through the integration of asthma genes, risk exposures, and metabolomics" (PI, R01HL141826) and a Department of Defense grant, “Metabolomics of lead exposure and its role in respiratory disease”, have enabled her to develop a metabolomics research program at the Channing Division of Network Medicine that focuses on using metabolomics to study the etiology of chronic lung diseases. Dr. Lasky-Su’s more recent work has focused on integrative metabolomics and other omic data types particularly genetics and genomics. She has applied various integrative approaches using networks and more traditional statistical approaches. This work has resulted in the identification of important biological determinants for asthma, in particular, specific metabolites in the sphingolipid pathway that are related to ORMDL3, the most well-established asthma gene. Dr. Lasky-Su also serves in several metabolomics leadership capacities including being the acting chairman of the Consortium of METabolomic Studies (COMETS) and as a member of the board of the International Metabolomics Society.

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The generation of metabolomic data in large epidemiological cohorts is now a reality, enabling the use of metabolomics to study the pathogenesis of many high impact diseases. Chronic obstructive lung diseases (COLDs), such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and bronchitis, represent a group of common respiratory illnesses with a high public health impact. COLDs are complex in nature, with influences from both genetics and the environment.  While genetic variants have been identified for several COLDs, to date, much remains to be understood about the ways in which these variants impact disease. Metabolomics represents an area of research that has the potential to contribute substantially to the understanding of disease etiology, and in particular providing insight into how identified genetic variants may impact disease.  This Special Issue highlights the use of metabolomics in COLDs. Specific areas include, but are not limited to, using metabolomics to study the etiology of COLDs; the generation of metabolic biomarkers for COLDs; the integration of multi-omic data for COLDs, bioinformatics, statistical, network, and analytic approaches that are relevant for COLDs, study design for the metabolomics of COLDs, and tissue-specific metabolomics for respiratory disease.

Assoc. Prof. Jessica Lasky-Su, Sc.D.
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metabolites is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Asthma
  • COPD
  • Bronchitis
  • Chronic obstructive lung disease
  • Integrative omics
  • Genetics
  • Exhaled breath condensate

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Metabolomics Identifies Novel Blood Biomarkers of Pulmonary Function and COPD in the General Population
Metabolites 2019, 9(4), 61; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo9040061
Received: 8 February 2019 / Revised: 21 March 2019 / Accepted: 26 March 2019 / Published: 1 April 2019
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Abstract
Determination of metabolomic signatures of pulmonary function and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the general population could aid in identification and understanding of early disease processes. Metabolome measurements were performed on serum from 4742 individuals (2354 African-Americans and 1529 European-Americans from the [...] Read more.
Determination of metabolomic signatures of pulmonary function and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the general population could aid in identification and understanding of early disease processes. Metabolome measurements were performed on serum from 4742 individuals (2354 African-Americans and 1529 European-Americans from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study and 859 Europeans from the Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg study). We examined 368 metabolites in relation to cross-sectional measures of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), their ratio (FEV1/FVC) and COPD using multivariable regression followed by meta-analysis. At a false discovery rate of 0.05, 95 metabolites were associated with FEV1 and 100 with FVC (73 overlapping), including inverse associations with branched-chain amino acids and positive associations with glutamine. Ten metabolites were associated with FEV1/FVC and seventeen with COPD (393 cases). Enriched pathways of amino acid metabolism were identified. Associations with FEV1 and FVC were not driven by individuals with COPD. We identified novel metabolic signatures of pulmonary function and COPD in African and European ancestry populations. These may allow development of biomarkers in the general population of early disease pathogenesis, before pulmonary function has decreased to levels diagnostic for COPD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolomics and Chronic Obstructive Lung Diseases)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
An Updated Overview of Metabolomic Profile Changes in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Metabolites 2019, 9(6), 111; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo9060111
Received: 12 April 2019 / Revised: 29 May 2019 / Accepted: 3 June 2019 / Published: 10 June 2019
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Abstract
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a common and heterogeneous respiratory disease, is characterized by persistent and incompletely reversible airflow limitation. Metabolomics is applied to analyze the difference of metabolic profile based on the low-molecular-weight metabolites (<1 kDa). Emerging metabolomic analysis may provide insights [...] Read more.
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a common and heterogeneous respiratory disease, is characterized by persistent and incompletely reversible airflow limitation. Metabolomics is applied to analyze the difference of metabolic profile based on the low-molecular-weight metabolites (<1 kDa). Emerging metabolomic analysis may provide insights into the pathogenesis and diagnosis of COPD. This review aims to summarize the alteration of metabolites in blood/serum/plasma, urine, exhaled breath condensate, lung tissue samples, etc. from COPD individuals, thereby uncovering the potential pathogenesis of COPD according to the perturbed metabolic pathways. Metabolomic researches have indicated that the dysfunctions of amino acid metabolism, lipid metabolism, energy production pathways, and the imbalance of oxidations and antioxidations might lead to local and systematic inflammation by activating the Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells signaling pathway and releasing inflammatory cytokines, like interleutin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α, and IL-8. In addition, they might cause protein malnutrition and oxidative stress and contribute to the development and exacerbation of COPD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolomics and Chronic Obstructive Lung Diseases)
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