Special Issue "Metabolomics and Chronic Obstructive Lung Diseases"

A special issue of Metabolites (ISSN 2218-1989). This special issue belongs to the section "Endocrinology and Clinical Metabolic Research".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Jessica Lasky-Su
Website
Guest Editor
Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
Interests: Genetic epidemiology; asthma; GWAS genetics; metabolomics, COPD

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The generation of metabolomic data in large epidemiological cohorts is now a reality, enabling the use of metabolomics to study the pathogenesis of many high impact diseases. Chronic obstructive lung diseases (COLDs), such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and bronchitis, represent a group of common respiratory illnesses with a high public health impact. COLDs are complex in nature, with influences from both genetics and the environment.  While genetic variants have been identified for several COLDs, to date, much remains to be understood about the ways in which these variants impact disease. Metabolomics represents an area of research that has the potential to contribute substantially to the understanding of disease etiology, and in particular providing insight into how identified genetic variants may impact disease.  This Special Issue highlights the use of metabolomics in COLDs. Specific areas include, but are not limited to, using metabolomics to study the etiology of COLDs; the generation of metabolic biomarkers for COLDs; the integration of multi-omic data for COLDs, bioinformatics, statistical, network, and analytic approaches that are relevant for COLDs, study design for the metabolomics of COLDs, and tissue-specific metabolomics for respiratory disease.

Assoc. Prof. Jessica Lasky-Su, Sc.D.
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Asthma
  • COPD
  • Bronchitis
  • Chronic obstructive lung disease
  • Integrative omics
  • Genetics
  • Exhaled breath condensate

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessCommunication
Metabolic Fingerprint of Chronic Obstructive Lung Diseases: A New Diagnostic Perspective
Metabolites 2019, 9(12), 290; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo9120290 - 26 Nov 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Chronic obstructive lung disease (COLD) is a group of airway diseases, previously known as emphysema and chronic bronchitis. The heterogeneity of COLD does not allow early diagnosis and leads to increased morbidity and mortality. The increasing number of COLD incidences stresses the need [...] Read more.
Chronic obstructive lung disease (COLD) is a group of airway diseases, previously known as emphysema and chronic bronchitis. The heterogeneity of COLD does not allow early diagnosis and leads to increased morbidity and mortality. The increasing number of COLD incidences stresses the need for precision medicine approaches that are specific to the patient. Metabolomics is an emerging technology that allows for the discrimination of metabolic changes in the cell as a result of environmental factors and specific genetic background. Thus, quantification of metabolites in human biofluids can provide insights into the metabolic state of the individual in real time and unravel the presence of, or predisposition to, a disease. In this article, the advantages of and potential barriers to putting metabolomics into clinical practice for COLD are discussed. Today, metabolomics is mostly lab-based, and research studies with novel COLD-specific biomarkers are continuously being published. Several obstacles in the research and the market field hamper the translation of these data into clinical practice. However, technological and computational advances will facilitate the clinical interpretation of data and provide healthcare professionals with the tools to prevent, diagnose, and treat COLD with precision in the coming decades. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolomics and Chronic Obstructive Lung Diseases)
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Open AccessArticle
Dysregulation of the Tryptophan Pathway Evidences Gender Differences in COPD
Metabolites 2019, 9(10), 212; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo9100212 - 01 Oct 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Increased activity of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) have been reported in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We therefore investigated the effect of gender stratification upon the observed levels of tryptophan metabolites in COPD. Tryptophan, serotonin, kynurenine, and kynurenic [...] Read more.
Increased activity of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) have been reported in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We therefore investigated the effect of gender stratification upon the observed levels of tryptophan metabolites in COPD. Tryptophan, serotonin, kynurenine, and kynurenic acid were quantified in serum of never-smokers (n = 39), smokers (n = 40), COPD smokers (n = 27), and COPD ex-smokers (n = 11) by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MS/MS). The individual metabolite associations with lung function, blood, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) immune-cell composition, as well as chemokine and cytokine levels, were investigated. Stratification by gender and smoking status revealed that the observed alterations in kynurenine and kynurenic acid, and to a lesser extent serotonin, were prominent in males, irrespective of COPD status (kynurenine p = 0.005, kynurenic acid p = 0.009, and serotonin p = 0.02). Inferred serum IDO activity and kynurenine levels decreased in smokers relative to never-smokers (p = 0.005 and p = 0.004, respectively). In contrast, inferred tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) activity and serotonin levels showed an increase with smoking that reached significance with COPD (p = 0.01 and p = 0.01, respectively). Serum IDO activity correlated with blood CXC chemokine ligand 9 (CXCL9, p = 0.0009, r = 0.93) and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 4 (CCL4.(p = 0.04, r = 0.73) in female COPD smokers. Conversely, serum serotonin levels correlated with BAL CD4+ T-cells (%) (p = 0.001, r = 0.92) and CD8+ T-cells (%) (p = 0.002, r = −0.90) in female COPD smokers, but not in male COPD smokers (p = 0.1, r = 0.46 and p = 0.1, r = −0.50, respectively). IDO- and TPH-mediated tryptophan metabolites showed gender-based associations in COPD, which were primarily driven by smoking status. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolomics and Chronic Obstructive Lung Diseases)
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Open AccessArticle
Neonatal Urine Metabolic Profiling and Development of Childhood Asthma
Metabolites 2019, 9(9), 185; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo9090185 - 16 Sep 2019
Abstract
Urine metabolomics case-control studies of childhood asthma have demonstrated a discriminative ability. Here, we investigated whether urine metabolic profiles from healthy neonates were associated with the development of asthma in childhood. Untargeted metabolomics by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was applied to urine samples collected [...] Read more.
Urine metabolomics case-control studies of childhood asthma have demonstrated a discriminative ability. Here, we investigated whether urine metabolic profiles from healthy neonates were associated with the development of asthma in childhood. Untargeted metabolomics by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was applied to urine samples collected at age 4 weeks in 171 and 161 healthy neonates born from mothers with asthma from the COPSAC2000 and COPSAC2010 cohorts, respectively, where persistent wheeze/asthma was prospectively diagnosed using a symptom-based algorithm. Univariate and multivariate analyses were applied to investigate differences in metabolic profiles between children who developed asthma and healthy children. Univariate analysis showed 63 and 87 metabolites (q-value < 0.15) in COPSAC2000 and COPSAC2010, respectively, which is promising for discriminating between asthmatic and healthy children. Of those, 14 metabolites were common among the two cohorts. Multivariate random forest and projection to latent structures discriminant analyses confirmed the discriminatory capacity of the metabolic profiles in both cohorts with estimated errors in prediction equal to 35% and AUCpred > 0.60. Database search enabled annotation of three discriminative features: a glucoronidated compound (steroid), 3-hydroxytetradecanedioic acid (fatty acid), and taurochenodeoxycholate-3-sulfate (bile acid). The urine metabolomics profiles from healthy neonates were associated with the development of childhood asthma, but further research is needed to understand underlying metabolic pathways. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolomics and Chronic Obstructive Lung Diseases)
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Open AccessArticle
Pharmacometabolomics of Bronchodilator Response in Asthma and the Role of Age-Metabolite Interactions
Metabolites 2019, 9(9), 179; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo9090179 - 07 Sep 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The role of metabolism in modifying age-related differential responses to asthma medications is insufficiently understood. The objective of this study was to determine the role of the metabolome in modifying the effect of age on bronchodilator response (BDR) in individuals with asthma. We [...] Read more.
The role of metabolism in modifying age-related differential responses to asthma medications is insufficiently understood. The objective of this study was to determine the role of the metabolome in modifying the effect of age on bronchodilator response (BDR) in individuals with asthma. We used longitudinal measures of BDR and plasma metabolomic profiling in 565 children with asthma from the Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP) to identify age by metabolite interactions on BDR. The mean ages at the three studied time-points across 16 years of follow-up in CAMP were 8.8, 12.8, and 16.8 years; the mean BDRs were 11%, 9% and 8%, respectively. Of 501 identified metabolites, 39 (7.8%) demonstrated a significant interaction with age on BDR (p-value < 0.05). We were able to validate two significant interactions in 320 children with asthma from the Genetics of Asthma in Costa Rica Study; 2-hydroxyglutarate, a compound involved in butanoate metabolism (interaction; CAMP: β = −0.004, p = 1.8 × 10−4; GACRS: β = −0.015, p = 0.018), and a cholesterol ester; CE C18:1 (CAMP: β = 0.005, p = 0.006; GACRS: β = 0.023, p = 0.041) Five additional metabolites had a p-value < 0.1 in GACRS, including Gammaminobutyric acid (GABA), C16:0 CE, C20:4 CE, C18.0 CE and ribothymidine. These findings suggest Cholesterol esters and GABA may modify the estimated effect of age on bronchodilator response. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolomics and Chronic Obstructive Lung Diseases)
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Open AccessArticle
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid from COPD Patients Reveals More Compounds Associated with Disease than Matched Plasma
Metabolites 2019, 9(8), 157; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo9080157 - 25 Jul 2019
Abstract
Smoking causes chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Though recent studies identified a COPD metabolomic signature in blood, no large studies examine the metabolome in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, a more direct representation of lung cell metabolism. We performed untargeted liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC–MS) [...] Read more.
Smoking causes chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Though recent studies identified a COPD metabolomic signature in blood, no large studies examine the metabolome in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, a more direct representation of lung cell metabolism. We performed untargeted liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC–MS) on BAL and matched plasma from 115 subjects from the SPIROMICS cohort. Regression was performed with COPD phenotypes as the outcome and metabolites as the predictor, adjusted for clinical covariates and false discovery rate. Weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) grouped metabolites into modules which were then associated with phenotypes. K-means clustering grouped similar subjects. We detected 7939 and 10,561 compounds in BAL and paired plasma samples, respectively. FEV1/FVC (Forced Expiratory Volume in One Second/Forced Vital Capacity) ratio, emphysema, FEV1 % predicted, and COPD exacerbations associated with 1230, 792, eight, and one BAL compounds, respectively. Only two plasma compounds associated with a COPD phenotype (emphysema). Three BAL co-expression modules associated with FEV1/FVC and emphysema. K-means BAL metabolomic signature clustering identified two groups, one with more airway obstruction (34% of subjects, median FEV1/FVC 0.67), one with less (66% of subjects, median FEV1/FVC 0.77; p < 2 × 10−4). Associations between metabolites and COPD phenotypes are more robustly represented in BAL compared to plasma. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolomics and Chronic Obstructive Lung Diseases)
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Open AccessArticle
Metabolomics Identifies Novel Blood Biomarkers of Pulmonary Function and COPD in the General Population
Metabolites 2019, 9(4), 61; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo9040061 - 01 Apr 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Determination of metabolomic signatures of pulmonary function and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the general population could aid in identification and understanding of early disease processes. Metabolome measurements were performed on serum from 4742 individuals (2354 African-Americans and 1529 European-Americans from the [...] Read more.
Determination of metabolomic signatures of pulmonary function and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the general population could aid in identification and understanding of early disease processes. Metabolome measurements were performed on serum from 4742 individuals (2354 African-Americans and 1529 European-Americans from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study and 859 Europeans from the Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg study). We examined 368 metabolites in relation to cross-sectional measures of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), their ratio (FEV1/FVC) and COPD using multivariable regression followed by meta-analysis. At a false discovery rate of 0.05, 95 metabolites were associated with FEV1 and 100 with FVC (73 overlapping), including inverse associations with branched-chain amino acids and positive associations with glutamine. Ten metabolites were associated with FEV1/FVC and seventeen with COPD (393 cases). Enriched pathways of amino acid metabolism were identified. Associations with FEV1 and FVC were not driven by individuals with COPD. We identified novel metabolic signatures of pulmonary function and COPD in African and European ancestry populations. These may allow development of biomarkers in the general population of early disease pathogenesis, before pulmonary function has decreased to levels diagnostic for COPD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolomics and Chronic Obstructive Lung Diseases)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Gut Microbial-Derived Metabolomics of Asthma
Metabolites 2020, 10(3), 97; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo10030097 - 06 Mar 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
In this review, we discuss gut microbial-derived metabolites involved with the origins and pathophysiology of asthma, a chronic respiratory disease that is influenced by the microbiome. Although both gut and airway microbiomes may be important in asthma development, we focus here on the [...] Read more.
In this review, we discuss gut microbial-derived metabolites involved with the origins and pathophysiology of asthma, a chronic respiratory disease that is influenced by the microbiome. Although both gut and airway microbiomes may be important in asthma development, we focus here on the gut microbiome and metabolomic pathways involved in immune system ontogeny. Metabolite classes with existing evidence that microbial-derived products influence asthma risk include short chain fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids and bile acids. While tryptophan metabolites and sphingolipids have known associations with asthma, additional research is needed to clarify the extent to which the microbiome contributes to the effects of these metabolites on asthma. These metabolite classes can influence immune function in one of two ways: (i) promoting growth or maturity of certain immune cell populations or (ii) influencing antigenic load by enhancing the number or species of specific bacteria. A more comprehensive understanding of how gut microbes and metabolites interact to modify asthma risk and morbidity will pave the way for targeted diagnostics and treatments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolomics and Chronic Obstructive Lung Diseases)
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Open AccessReview
An Updated Overview of Metabolomic Profile Changes in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Metabolites 2019, 9(6), 111; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo9060111 - 10 Jun 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a common and heterogeneous respiratory disease, is characterized by persistent and incompletely reversible airflow limitation. Metabolomics is applied to analyze the difference of metabolic profile based on the low-molecular-weight metabolites (<1 kDa). Emerging metabolomic analysis may provide insights [...] Read more.
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a common and heterogeneous respiratory disease, is characterized by persistent and incompletely reversible airflow limitation. Metabolomics is applied to analyze the difference of metabolic profile based on the low-molecular-weight metabolites (<1 kDa). Emerging metabolomic analysis may provide insights into the pathogenesis and diagnosis of COPD. This review aims to summarize the alteration of metabolites in blood/serum/plasma, urine, exhaled breath condensate, lung tissue samples, etc. from COPD individuals, thereby uncovering the potential pathogenesis of COPD according to the perturbed metabolic pathways. Metabolomic researches have indicated that the dysfunctions of amino acid metabolism, lipid metabolism, energy production pathways, and the imbalance of oxidations and antioxidations might lead to local and systematic inflammation by activating the Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells signaling pathway and releasing inflammatory cytokines, like interleutin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α, and IL-8. In addition, they might cause protein malnutrition and oxidative stress and contribute to the development and exacerbation of COPD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metabolomics and Chronic Obstructive Lung Diseases)
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